Tag Archives: drought

Connecting the dots: Vulnerability, environmental stewardship, and resilience

Connecting the dots: Vulnerability, environment stewardship, and resilience | World Vision Blog

In Tanzania, Neseriani helps her neighbor dig a water pan to capture rainfall. (Photo: 2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

World Environment Day calls us to be good stewards. This is especially important for people living in poverty: their livelihoods depend on the natural resources that are often overexploited.

Our Natural Resource Management advisor explains how we're working to promote good stewardship.

How sound policy can silence the sound of suffering

How sound policy can silence the sound of suffering | World Vision Blog

In 1985, a hungry Ethiopian family huddles in their "home" in a dry river bed. (Photo: ©1985 Steve Reynolds/World Vision)

30 years ago, bad policies, drought, and the resulting famine led to mass starvation and the deaths of at least 400,000 people in Ethiopia.

Today, as parts of Africa face a new drought, we have the opportunity to put in place a good policy that could help prevent another worst-case scenario.

Learn about the bill that's in Congress right now and what you can do to help.

Not helpless but hopeful

Not helpless but hopeful | World Vision Blog

Leonard (right) with his five siblings at their home in Malawi. (Photo: 2015 Charles Kabena/World Vision)

Charles Kabena is a writer for World Vision Malawi. In today's blog, he describes meeting 13-year-old Leonard, whose family was suffering due to a food crisis, and who had left school to help his mother provide for his five siblings.

When Charles returned two months later, things had changed.

Charles relates to Leonard—as a boy in Malawi, he suffered from hunger during a food crisis, too. See what provided hope for both of these boys.

Smiles, laughter in the midst of crisis

World Vision's Mariana Chokaa reports from Niger, a country left reeling from the drought and hunger crisis that has devastated Africa's Sahel region. At a local clinic, where one might expect to encounter the desperation of malnourished children, she instead observes a downright cheerful atmosphere.

What explains this? World Vision's early interventions amid increasingly dire conditions have helped save lives.

How much is a life worth?

In the news business, there's a saying that goes, “One dead fireman in Brooklyn is worth five English bobbies, who are worth fifty Arabs, who are worth five hundred Africans.” I quoted this in my first book, The Hole in Our Gospel.

It’s understandable that we identify and sympathize with the people closest to us. We have a harder time empathizing with people who are somehow removed -- whether geographically, culturally, religiously, or nationally. It’s normal.

But it’s not okay.

[Infographic] Drought, food crisis, and famine: What's the difference?

Drought, food crisis, and famine: When the technicality of these terms is stripped away, we simply associate them with people not getting the food and water they need to survive. While this is easy enough to understand as a general concept, the "how," "why," and "what can I do" are a bit more complex.

In order to make these concepts easier to understand, we've broken in them down into an easy-on-the-eyes infographic. Click the image below to get the full scoop!

Mauritania: A story of life or death

Rich Stearns, president of World Vision U.S., recently warned that we must take decisive action now to prevent the hunger crisis in West Africa's Sahel region from devolving into outright famine, similar to what was seen in parts of the Horn of Africa last year.

Today, World Vision's Adel Sarkozi writes from Mauritania, confirming this message: West Africa may not be making headlines in the media, but the humanitarian situation there is dire, and we must act immediately.

Fighting famine is ineffective aid

It’s popular in the press to judge a charity by its efficiency. Donors want to know whether their money is being used effectively, and journalists play a valuable part in keeping organizations accountable.

Without downplaying the important role the media play in this respect, I believe the public’s concerns about effective aid would be better served if the press also paid attention to slow-building disasters early on -- before they begin claiming lives. Inefficient responses to disasters can cost as much as 80 times more than a well-planned early response.

Caring for God's creation on Earth Day

Today is Earth Day, an opportunity to step back and appreciate the care and detail God put into creating our universe. God is an amazing artist, and He has set creation before us to show us His glory and remind us of His love. Psalm 95:3-5 tells us: "For the LORD is the great God, the great King above all gods. In his hand are the depths of the earth, and the mountain peaks belong to him. The sea is his, for he made it, and his hands formed the dry land." In Seattle, where I live, this verse comes to life all the time -- natural beauty is evident all around me. Lush green trees, beautiful mountain ranges, numerous lakes, and the Puget Sound remind me of God’s creativity and craftsmanship daily. Spring has brought cherry blossoms and daffodils in abundance. Everywhere I look, I see His awe-inspiring creation.

PHOTOS: Desperate struggles amid hunger crisis in Niger

As is the case throughout much of West Africa's Sahel region, children and families in the village of Tabouche, Niger, are taking extreme measures just to survive. An ongoing drought continues to fuel a hunger crisis that shows no signs of letting up.

The images below provide a glimpse into a part of the world that desperately needs our attention and assistance. (Photos by Chris Sisarich for World Vision.)

Hunger and drought creep across northern Africa

In Africa, there is often a period of time between when a family’s stores from their last harvest runs out and when their new crop is ready to eat. These are known as the "hungry months."

Expensive, store-bought food is purchased and carefully rationed. Those who can’t buy food depend on neighbors, relatives, churches, and food distributions. And if there’s a drought, crops fail, or rains are late, those hungry months can turn into a hungry year.

This is the case for communities in the Horn of Africa (Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Somalia), which is recovering from a historic drought and food crisis, and communities in West Africa (Niger, Mauritania, Mali, Chad, and Senegal), where drought is just settling in.

Why water makes the difference: A tale of two towns

What does clean water mean to you? How often do you think about it? In her fourth blog entry, World Vision's Lauren Fisher compares two communities in Niger -- one that has a safe source of water, and one that does not. Follow Lauren's trip here on our blog or @WorldVisionNews (#wvlauren) for live, on-the-ground reports from the field.

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Lately, you could say water has become a major obsession of mine. In the past, I’ve taken it for granted. It’s the back-up beverage when I can’t find iced tea or soda; it's the bath I can count on at the end of a long day.

But as one colleague told me, in Zinder, water is precious. For me, that means there is no water at all, without warning, at any given time. At any given time, the shower stops working mid-shampoo, along with any other bathroom fixture. It’s made for some comical mornings, as you can well imagine.