PHOTOS: Witness to history

September 22 marks World Vision’s 62nd anniversary of serving children, families, and communities in need.

World Vision photographs document the most tragic crises of the past six decades. Today, many of these places have seen healing and recovery, thanks to the work of nongovernmental organizations.

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Korea, 1952: World Vision founder Bob Pierce reported on the Korean War as a United Nations war correspondent. Korea, 1952: World Vision founder Bob Pierce reported on the Korean War as a United Nations war correspondent. His description of people’s struggles helped fuel World Vision’s early fundraising efforts.
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South China Sea, 1979: Aboard World Vision’s ship, Operation Seasweep, a crew member recognizes one of the just-rescued as his cousin. South China Sea, 1979: Aboard World Vision’s ship, Operation Seasweep, a crew member recognizes one of the just-rescued as his cousin. Seasweep assisted families fleeing war-torn Vietnam by boat, giving them medical care and helping transport them to refugee camps. (Photo: John Kubly/World Vision)
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Ethiopia, 1985: Near a World Vision feeding center in Sanka, people rise with the dawn after sleeping outside all night, hoping to find relief from the famine that gripped the country. Ethiopia, 1985: Near a World Vision feeding center in Sanka, people rise with the dawn after sleeping outside all night, hoping to find relief from the famine that gripped the country. (Photo: Steve Reynolds/World Vision)
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Witness to History | World Vision Blog Uganda, 1990: In southern Rakai, siblings Teopista, John Bosco, Rosemary, and Felistus pose near their parents’ graves. As AIDS devastated rural communities, World Vision began special programs and child sponsorship to help thousands of orphans. (Photo: David Ward/World Vision)
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Romania, 1991: World Vision President Bob Seiple provides human touch for a child in the Leagunul Pentru orphanage in Cluj-Napoca. Romania, 1991: World Vision President Bob Seiple provides human touch for a child in the Leagunul Pentru orphanage in Cluj-Napoca. After communism ended, the world discovered that many of the children living in oppressive, understaffed institutions had been abandoned by their parents. (Photo: Bruce Brander/World Vision)
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Rwanda, 1994: Amid scenes of massacres, World Vision journalists found these young survivors taking refuge in the Gahini Missionary Hospital near Kigali. Rwanda, 1994: A team of World Vision journalists arrived in the country weeks after the genocidal violence began. Amid scenes of massacres, they found these young survivors taking refuge in the Gahini Missionary Hospital near Kigali.
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Peru, 1997: Abilia Acuna Loila’s grief is still fresh as she recounts the murder of her daughter by Shining Path rebels five years earlier in Ayacucho province. Peru, 1997: Abilia Acuna Loila’s grief is still fresh as she recounts the murder of her daughter by Shining Path rebels five years earlier in Ayacucho province. World Vision was forced to reduce operations in Peru during the worst of the violence in the early 1990s, including suspending child sponsorship. (Photo: Todd Bartel/World Vision)
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Honduras, 1998: Sponsored child Angelica Elizabeth López, 3, survived the storm but lost her home to Hurricane Mitch, which killed more than 9,000 people across Central America. Honduras, 1998: Sponsored child Angelica Elizabeth López, 3, survived the storm but lost her home to Hurricane Mitch, which killed more than 9,000 people across Central America. (Photo: Jon Warren/World Vision)
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Kosovo, 1999: Ethnic Kosovar families fled from Serb attacks on their village near Istok, many trekking over mountain roads by foot. Kosovo, 1999: Ethnic Kosovar families fled from Serb attacks on their village near Istok, many trekking over mountain roads by foot. NATO bombing helped end the conflict a few months later, allowing people to return home. (Photo: John Schenk/World Vision)
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Indonesia, 2005: The city of Banda Aceh was devastated by the tsunami triggered by a massive earthquake on December 26, 2004. Indonesia, 2005: The city of Banda Aceh was devastated by the tsunami triggered by a massive earthquake on December 26, 2004. More than 120,000 people died in the disaster here. World Vision and many other humanitarian organizations helped Aceh rebuild. (Photo: Kevin Cook/World Vision)
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Uganda, 2005: A boy at World Vision’s Children of War Rehabilitation Center in Gulu uses a toy gun to re-enact his experiences as a captive of the Lord’s Resistance Army. Uganda, 2005: A boy at World Vision’s Children of War Rehabilitation Center in Gulu uses a toy gun to re-enact his experiences as a captive of the Lord’s Resistance Army. For more than 20 years, the rebel group terrorized northern Uganda and forced children into combat and sexual slavery. (Photo: Jon Warren/World Vision)
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United States, 2005: Rich Stearns, president of World Vision U.S., takes in the destruction in Waveland, Mississippi, after Hurricane Katrina. United States, 2005: Rich Stearns, president of World Vision U.S., takes in the destruction in Waveland, Mississippi, after Hurricane Katrina. World Vision opened a 40,000-square-foot distribution center in North Texas to provide cleaning products, building materials, and other supplies for affected families.
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Haiti, 2010: Jenny Cherry, 4, wails in pain at a makeshift hospital in Fond Parisen, where many victims of the 7.0-magnitude earthquake were treated. Haiti, 2010: Jenny Cherry, 4, wails in pain at a makeshift hospital in Fond Parisen, where many victims of the 7.0-magnitude earthquake were treated. The catastrophe killed an estimated 220,000 people and destroyed the capital, Port-au-Prince, and the surrounding area. World Vision continues to help communities recover and return to normalcy. (Photo: Jon Warren/World Vision)

    Comments

    Hi Victoria- isn't it amazing how much emotion can be captured in a single photo? They serve as a powerful reminder of why serving the poor is so important.

    -Lindsey, WV Staff

    Thank you for sharing and hearing the call of our Father in Heaven.

    Hi Eric-- we are happy to share! Thanks for your encouraging words.

    -Lindsey, WV Staff

    Not all people in the world have the chance and choice to live a better life. We don't know what is truly happening outside our country or even just outside our home. Through World Vision, many lives have changed especially the lives of the needy children. I am grateful and thankful for the efforts of World Vision as well as the people who support the ministry of giving and sharing without expectations.

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