Debbie Macomber: A love story

Debbie Macomber: A love story | World Vision Blog

Debbie Macomber is welcomed at the St. Elizabeth's school for girls in Kenya. (Photo: 2014 Lindsey Minerva/World Vision)

Over the course of her illustrious career, best-selling author Debbie Macomber has written hundreds of stories. Today, she is the main character.

The supporting characters of this story are a Microsoft VP, World Vision, and the girls of a school in Kenya.

Read our story of determination, passion, and heart!

Literacy begins before school

Literacy begins before school | World Vision Blog

5-year-old Mugisha in Burundi learned to write and read before he began school through a World Vision reading camp. (Photo: ©2013 Achel Bayisenge/World Vision)

Today is International Literacy Day!

In eastern Burundi, an initial reading assessment of 560 school children revealed that only 26 percent of second graders are able to read and differentiate consonants from vowels.

For some children, this is changing. Mugisha, a five-year-old first grader, is one of them. He knew how to write and read before he started primary school, thanks to World Vision.

A way out of illiteracy

A way out of illiteracy | World Vision Blog

Celebrate World Book and Copyright Day with us today!

After a survey found that more than 40% of school children in a district of Ethiopia couldn't read, World Vision piloted a reading camps program. Read how these camps are transforming literacy and the lives of children in Ethiopia, and our plans for the future!

Opportunity in broken chalk

Opportunity in broken chalk | World Vision Blog

Amina with her siblings, and behind them the brown chalkboard that Amina uses to teach them. (Photo: 2014 Jessica Biseko/World Vision)

As a sponsored child, Amina – 11, from Tanzania – is able to go to school. But her siblings aren’t as fortunate. To help give them a future, too, she collects pieces of broken chalk along what she learns and brings it all home to teach her siblings herself!

Protection through education

Protection through education | World Vision Blog

Before Ankit, 6, started attending World Vision's drop-in center last year, he used to roam the streets. (Photo: 2013 Annila Harris/World Vision)

One of the best ways to protect children from dangers like trafficking, child labor, and early marriage is to educate them, keeping them in school rather than on the streets. In India, World Vision's drop-in centers are designed to do just that: opening the door to mainstream schools.

Here are the stories of two children – Naina, 7, and Ankit, 6 – who found their way into formal education through these drop-in centers.

Gautam's sweet dreams

Gautam's sweet dreams | World Vision Blog

Gautam and his mother, Joyanti. (Photo: 2013 Md. Golam Ehsanul Habib/World Vision)

Saturday was Human Trafficking Awareness Day! How did you spread the word about this important issue?

Today's story comes from Bangladesh, where millions of children are caught up in child labor when their families can't afford to provide. Two years ago, Gautam's family couldn't afford more than two meals a day, to repair their home, or to send Gautam to school; now, Gautam sleeps well with a new roof and full belly, and goes to school. See how sponsorship helped keep him out of child labor!

Helping others along his life's journey

In Gudiyattam, India, World Vision's Born to be Free program works to help children stay in school through economic assistance, children's clubs, and other projects.

Sathyaraj, a former sponsored child, completed his education through World Vision's programs and is now an advocate for children's issues, wanting his village to be a model for the whole country.

A stitch in time empowers

In India, there is a long-standing tradition that women serve men and maintain the home. Many drop out of school; some never venture outside their homes at all.

Through World Vision training programs, women like Jyoti and Khadija receive training in tailoring as well as sewing machines, empowering them to open their own tailor shops and inspire the next generation.

A place to learn and call home

It’s been nearly three years since the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and many people there are still living in squalid conditions in camps. Families who had the means to leave the camps have now gone, and those remaining are among Port-au-Prince’s most vulnerable.

Knowing that even one child living in an unsafe and unsanitary camp is too many, World Vision is working on a project to help families move out of camps and into more durable accommodations. With World Vision helping to shoulder the burden of housing, families are able to invest their resources into their children's educations -- and most importantly, their futures.