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Child Sponsorship

Why World Vision? Breaking the cycle of poverty

Poverty is a deeper issue than a simple lack of resources, which is why World Vision takes a holistic approach to community development in order to address all of poverty’s complexity. Though money won’t solve poverty alone, Economic Development is still a vital component to breaking the cycle. Today’s infographic explores how World Vision develops communities economically.

Why World Vision? Communities Matter

World Vision believes that working at the community level is the best solution for sustainable development. All week, we look forward to sharing with you our holistic model and the effectiveness of coming alongside a community working to become free from poverty.

Be sure to check back throughout the week to see a beautiful photo blog, a video, and a Q&A with our community development expert!

Why World Vision? From "spare change" to lasting change

Ever wonder how your donations to World Vision make a difference?

Over the next few months, we're excited to share with you the vision of our ministry, exploring two areas -- how we work, and what difference it makes for those whom we serve.

Expect infographics, stories from the field, and Q&As with development experts each week as we highlight how our community development helps create freedom from poverty through a variety of interventions -- such as clean water, food, education, and economic development.

A child's daily journey to school: The face of reality in the Philippines

At the age of 9, Miljhon has already seen some of life's harsh realities. Growing up in poverty, this young boy, his sister, and his classmates face significant hardships just to get to school every day.

Despite their circumstances, Miljhon and the other children have such pure hearts that they share with their schoolmates -- even though they too have almost nothing.

Sponsorship Q&A with a Program Manager in India

World Vision works with each community and its families to determine what is needed most to improve the lives of their children and fight poverty.

Recently, our Facebook fans submitted questions about how this happens. With those questions in hand, World Vision's Annila Harris interviewed Pratyush Das, our program manager in India.

Pratyush’s background is originally in finance, and he has worked with World Vision for 13 years in a variety of different areas. His responses reflect his expertise in the South Delhi area development program.

Survive to thrive

Each day, thousands of children are robbed of the chance to live a healthy, productive life -- all because of preventable, treatable diseases.

World Vision is partnering with national radio network K-LOVE -- which includes more than 400 contemporary Christian radio stations across the country -- to help children around the world Survive to 5.

A doll named Alma

Today's guest post comes from Alexis Dionne, a World Vision sponsor who shares what she does to let her sponsored children know they're loved and cared for during the holiday season.

If you're a World Vision sponsor as well, you can log in to My World Vision for ideas on how to connect with your sponsored child as the holidays approach.

Who's that girl?

"Who’s that girl?" I wondered while watching Carter’s Chord, a sister band who recently traveled to the Dominican Republic to create a video of their song, "Love a Little Bigger."

I love the song and its message: how blessed we are and how a luxury, like drinking a $4 cup of coffee, can make us feel guilty, especially when we are confronted by pictures of the poor.

Being from Seattle, the coffee center of the universe, I can relate.

The video is beautiful. The Carter’s Chord sisters are lovely. Their voices are wonderful. The Dominican Republic is an astonishing country, dripping with tropical delight.

But the prettiest thing in the video is its little star -- a girl whose life they captured from her early-morning routine, waking up and rubbing the sleep from her eyes, through the moment where she seemed to take flight -- dancing with the Carter’s Chord sisters as they sang.