Child Protection

Good Friday: Thirsty for justice

Good Friday: Thirsty for justice | World Vision Blog

Juliet holds her son, Junior Kisule, 2, who was saved through an initiative to prevent child sacrifice in Uganda. (©2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

On Good Friday, Jesus' next to last words were: "I am thirsty."

Today, Kari Costanza writes about Obed, a young man in Uganda who is also thirsty — thirsty for justice. “If a life is saved,” he says, “there is no greater good than that.”

Read how this Ugandan superhero's initiative and tireless work within his community are helping to save children from the evil of child sacrifice.

What Disney’s Frozen teaches us about childhood

What Disney’s Frozen teaches us about childhood | World Vision Blog

Children in Romania learn how to build a snowman. (Photo: 1993 Karen Homer/World Vision)

“Do you want to build a snowman?”

What Disney’s Academy Award-winning animated musical Frozen teaches us about childhood, love, and the importance of protecting children.

Salmina escapes from early marriage

Salmina escapes from early marriage | World Vision Blog

Salmina, 16, escaped an arranged, early marriage in Mozambique and is looking forward to returning to school. (Photo: Leovigildo Pedro/World Vision)

16-year-old Salmina lives in Mozambique. Last year, at only 15, she felt that her life was at stake when she was forced to marry a 58-year-old man and leave school.

Thanks to a community member who was trained in child protection issues by World Vision, she escaped from the nightmare. Now she is looking forward to going back to school and pursuing her dream – of teaching mathematics. Read how World Vision is helping to raise awareness around this important issue.

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda | World Vision Blog

3-year-old Sharon in Uganda wears an earring – to protect her from child sacrifice. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

In certain districts of Uganda, child sacrifice is a real danger. Today, Kari Costanza writes from Uganda about 3-year-old Sharon, whose ear piercing may protect her.

Read how a World Vision-supported amber alert program is helping to recover children that have been taken.

World Poetry Day: “Childhood Lost” by Propaganda

World Poetry Day: “Childhood Lost” by Propaganda | World Vision Blog

Spoken-word artist Propaganda, featured in today's video. (Photo: Scott Erickson)

In honor of World Poetry Day today, we’re featuring our partner, spoken-word poet Propaganda, with a video of his poem “Childhood Lost.”

“Childhood is worth saving, because once it’s gone, it’s gone.”

Watch this powerful video, and learn more about Childhood Lost.

Protecting the poor from the plague of violence

Protecting the Poor from the Plague of Violence | World Vision Blog

"I do not want any one of us to be victims of human trafficking." –Cang, Vietnam. (Photo: 2013 Nguyen Thai Minh Minh/World Vision)

Today, our friends at International Justice Mission write about the everyday violence that is plaguing the developing world … and the new book they're launching today!

Under the big tree

Under the big tree | World Vision Blog

A World Vision savings group meets in Tanzania. (©2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

This past Friday, our wonderful writer/photographer team (Kari Costanza and Jon Warren) was in Tanzania, where they heard an amazing story of a community standing up to protect a little girl…from a very early marriage. This is what happened!

Su Su is finding her own dream

Su Su is finding her own dream | World Vision Blog

18-year-old Su Su is learning skills as a hairdresser. Now she has hope for her dream of being a hair salon owner.

As a child, Su Su* worked a variety of jobs in Cambodia to help provide for her family, a road that led her into prostitution at the age of 14.

Through a World Vision recovery center, Su Su has learned the skills she needs to follow her dream. Now, she has real plans for her future.

This is her story in her own words.**

Roots and wings

Roots and wings | World Vision Blog

Zebra is a former child soldier who benefited from World Vision’s Rebound project. Today, he has his own carpentry business and is able to lead a normal life. (©2012 Gilbertine Julie Uwimana/World Vision)

A few months ago, World Vision communicator Jeremie Olivier traveled to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and met children benefiting from World Vision’s Rebound project, which helps rehabilitate former child soldiers and prostitutes. Read about his encounter with Zawadi and how this teenager is finding her wings through mechanics.

Betrothed before birth

Today, join us in celebrating the U.N.’s International Day of the Girl Child!

With our partner 10x10 and their documentary, Girl Rising, we're aiming to ignite a movement to educate girls around the world. Millions of girls, like Jenneh in Sierra Leone, face barriers to their education. This is Jenneh's story.

A vision of opportunity for child laborers

Combating forced labor is part of World Vision’s holistic approach to protecting children and ensuring that every child has the opportunity to experience life in all its fullness. World Vision works to address the root causes of child labor and create opportunities for affected children to get an education and leave jobs that are often dangerous, dirty, and degrading.

Today, we present the stories of two boys whose lives as child laborers are turning toward new opportunities through World Vision programs.

A modern-day slave’s second chance

The International Labor Organization estimates that at least 20.9 million men, women, and children around the world suffer in forced labor, though the actual number could be closer to 27 million. Further, 55 percent of victims of forced labor are women, and girls comprise 98 percent of sex trafficking victims.

Chanty* was one of them -- but now she has a second chance.

Why World Vision? Life in all its fullness

Around the world, there are 115 million children trapped in hazardous child labor, and millions more are victims of abuse and other forms of exploitation. Under such conditions, children cannot experience fullness of life. World Vision works to protect children by preventing exploitation and abuse, by restoring children that have been abused, and by speaking out about child protection issues.

Today’s infographic illustrates our work in this sector.

Sumi's journey from horror to new hope

In February, advocates won a huge victory when the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA) passed Congress with broad bipartisan support. The TVPRA allowed the U.S. government to partner with the government of Bangladesh to pass its own anti-trafficking law in 2012.

Now, the fight begins to ensure that this law is funded and that the United States remains a leader in the global cause to end modern-day slavery, continuing to partner with countries like Bangladesh.

[Video] Melka's story: Child bride to advocate for girls

We first brought you the story of Melka in Ethiopia last year. Today, we're excited to present this video depiction of the remarkable young woman's journey.

Melka was 14 years old when, to her surprise, her parents married her off to an older man from another village whom she didn't even know. When Melka resisted him later that evening, he and his friends beat her severely. She woke up in the hospital.

Only a child, but already a man

More than 10,000 Cambodians cross the border into Thailand every day to earn a living. Among the throng of workers and peddlers are children like Horm, who gathers recyclable trash and sells his gleanings at Rong Kluea market.

He is only 10, but he already works like a man. Between his rounds, he drops by a World Vision learning center to play. It is at this center where he experiences just a few moments of being a child.

Saved from early marriage at age 10

Today's post brings us a story of tragedy turned to hope from Ethiopia, where 10-year-old Masresha was forced into early marriage by her family. In many developing countries, this is a harsh reality faced by young girls, as depicted in the film Girl Rising.

Q&A with an [almost] child bride

Shapla in Bangladesh was devastated when her parents arranged a marriage that would force her to drop out of school.

But thanks to World Vision, when Shapla told her friends about her situation, they knew what to do. Shapla's friends had completed a life-skills education course, and they were able to contact community leaders, who advocated for Shapla.

Read on to learn how Shapla escaped what she calls the "cave of death" -- and how her story represents World Vision's efforts to create futures of dignity and hope for girls and women.

When girls pay a terrible price for living in poverty

The United Nations has declared October 11 as International Day of the Girl. As illustrated by the tragic story of Mao* in Cambodia, extreme poverty often prevents girls from getting an education and leaves them vulnerable to the worst kinds of exploitation.

World Vision works globally to help change this reality -- and to empower girls and women to reach their full, God-given potential.