Child Protection

The hidden side of humanitarian crisis: Gender-based violence

The hidden side of humanitarian crisis: Gender-based violence | World Vision Blog

Photo: Ralph Baydoun/World Vision

During humanitarian crises like armed conflict and natural disasters, violence—especially against women and girls—has been shown to increase. This culture of violence can be one of the greatest challenges for people like refugees who are affected by crisis.

In these situations, some parents marry their young daughters off early to protect them … but in reality, child marriage is just another form of this violence. Our gender expert explains:

What do we know about preventing human trafficking?

What do we know about preventing human trafficking? | World Vision Blog

In Laos, trafficking survivors release balloons that carry written messages they want to communicate to family and friends. (Photo: 2015 Nila Douanesouvanh/World Vision)

If you knew the risks of human trafficking, would you still take those risks to provide for your family?

New research suggests that people in Southeast Asia do. See these surprising results and how we can help prevent trafficking.

From despair at night to hope in the morning

From despair at night to hope in the morning | World Vision Blog

Children play together at a World Vision Youth Club in Cambodia. (Photo: Laura Reinhardt/World Vision)

Human traffickers prey upon the vulnerable.

In Cambodia, where trafficking is common, see how education, food security, and improved economic opportunities are helping children and families know their rights and avoid being taken advantage of.

Dreams from Kenya

Dreams from Kenya | World Vision Blog

Debbie Macomber and her daughter Adele in Chicago with Lillian from Kenya. (Photo: Jon Warren/World Vision)

Expected to marry at 12, Lillian in Kenya ran away and found hope through World Vision.

Bestselling author Debbie Macomber met Lillian and heard her story "of amazing bravery and tenacity."

Lillian has now graduated high school! Read her inspiring story.

Q&A: Hope at home in Honduras

Q&A: Hope at home in Honduras | World Vision Blog

Hortensia with her daughter at their home in Honduras. (Photo: 2010 Abby Stalsbroten/World Vision)

Last summer, World Vision began responding to a crisis of unaccompanied children coming into the U.S. from Central American countries like Honduras.

Why are these children leaving home?

In today's Q&A, Matt Stephens—our senior advisor for child protection—answers this question and explores how World Vision is working to address the root causes of this crisis by promoting hope at home.

Day 13: Leaving no stone unturned

Leaving no stone unturned | World Vision Blog

At the age of 10, Subera in India was a child laborer, crushing stones by hand into construction material. It was her mother's same life: early marriage, no education, hard labor and poverty.

Today, Subera is 14 and in school, and on her way to a better future! See what broke her cycle of poverty and is helping make her big dreams come true.

Give thanks—part 2: Black Friday

Give thanks—part 2: Black Friday | World Vision Blog

Rich Stearns prays over Reshma in Bangladesh. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

In his two-part Thanksgiving series, World Vision USA president Rich Stearns reflects on his recent trip to Bangladesh. Read Part 1 here.

On this trip, Rich met Reshma, who will be bought and sold a dozen times today, on Black Friday, as a sex worker.

Read about the two bright spots in her life, and how World Vision is working to help her.

Give thanks—part 1: My first Thanksgiving of 2014

Give thanks—part 1: My first Thanksgiving of 2014 | World Vision Blog

Rich and Reneé Stearns with Chitra in Bangladesh. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Happy Thanksgiving! What are you thankful for today? We're thankful for you!

Earlier this month, Rich and Reneé Stearns shared their first Thanksgiving meal of 2014 with Dipshikha, who teaches the children of brothel workers at a World Vision Child Friendly Space in Bangladesh.

Read about their visit.

Living to serve others

Living to serve others | World Vision Blog

Karona Kang in Cambodia has been helping children recover from trafficking and abuse with World Vision since 2009. (Photo: 2014 Vanndeth Um/World Vision)

Karona Kang from Cambodia began working with World Vision as a volunteer. Later, in 2009, she became a housemother at a World Vision Trauma Recovery project for girls who have survived trafficking and abuse.

Today, she tells her story.

Getting kids out of the sugarcane fields

Getting kids out of the sugarcane fields | World Vision Blog

Community education team on Negros Island, Philippines. (Photo: 2014 Jesse Eaves/World Vision)

Marking the World Day Against Child Labor today, Jesse Eaves – our policy advisor in D.C. – writes about his recent trip to the Philippines, where World Vision is working with communities to stop hazardous child labor in the sugarcane fields.

Meet 12-year-old Oscar, and read how he's helping to prevent the job that he might have had without this program.

Dreams of soccer and a better life

Dreams of soccer and a better life | World Vision Blog

Márcio lives in Salvador, the most violent city in Brazil. (Photo: 2012 Debora-Oliveira/World Vision)

The World Cup starts this week in Brazil!

In Brazil, World Vision works with many children, like Márcio, who come from a background of violence. By incorporating activities like art, music, and sports – like soccer! – into school curricula, World Vision encourages children to stay in school and off the street.

Read Márcio's story!

Good Friday: Thirsty for justice

Good Friday: Thirsty for justice | World Vision Blog

Juliet holds her son, Junior Kisule, 2, who was saved through an initiative to prevent child sacrifice in Uganda. (©2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

On Good Friday, Jesus' next to last words were: "I am thirsty."

Today, Kari Costanza writes about Obed, a young man in Uganda who is also thirsty — thirsty for justice. “If a life is saved,” he says, “there is no greater good than that.”

Read how this Ugandan superhero's initiative and tireless work within his community are helping to save children from the evil of child sacrifice.

Salmina escapes from early marriage

Salmina escapes from early marriage | World Vision Blog

Salmina, 16, escaped an arranged, early marriage in Mozambique and is looking forward to returning to school. (Photo: Leovigildo Pedro/World Vision)

16-year-old Salmina lives in Mozambique. Last year, at only 15, she felt that her life was at stake when she was forced to marry a 58-year-old man and leave school.

Thanks to a community member who was trained in child protection issues by World Vision, she escaped from the nightmare. Now she is looking forward to going back to school and pursuing her dream – of teaching mathematics. Read how World Vision is helping to raise awareness around this important issue.

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda | World Vision Blog

3-year-old Sharon in Uganda wears an earring – to protect her from child sacrifice. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

In certain districts of Uganda, child sacrifice is a real danger. Today, Kari Costanza writes from Uganda about 3-year-old Sharon, whose ear piercing may protect her.

Read how a World Vision-supported amber alert program is helping to recover children that have been taken.