Day 16: Share a meal

Post Summary: 

World Vision is sharing joy across the United States by providing Family Food Kits to people who are going hungry because of natural disasters, homelessness, or job loss. Learn more with today’s video.

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Today’s challenge: Share a meal with a friend (or invite a friend over).

 

“Dear friends, let us love one another, for love comes from God. Everyone who loves has been born of God and knows God.” —1 John 4:7 (NIV)

 

Shipping love to the hungry

In 2010, the United States had the second-highest rate of childhood poverty among the 25 wealthiest industrialized nations. Across America, families go hungry every day because of natural disasters, unemployment, or homelessness.

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    Memories of Tacloban

    Post Summary: 

    Chris Weeks, from World Vision United Kingdom, describes his first experience of the devastated city of Tacloban in the Philippines. Now two weeks after the storm hit, relief efforts are well underway and reaching the survivors that need them while the people of Tacloban are finding the strength to begin rebuilding their city.

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    My sole memories of Tacloban are from the last 24 hours. Anyone who’s seen the city, two weeks after Typhoon Haiyan ferociously tore it to the ground, will never forget it.

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      We're cheap, and that's good

      Post Summary: 

      One of World Vision’s primary responses to disasters like Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines is the distribution of Family Food Kits and Hygiene Kits to survivors. On our Facebook page this week, we posted photos of the contents of these kits – but purchased here in the USA – and asked our followers to guess how much the items would cost. That price versus the price of each World Vision Kit might surprise you!

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      Each World Vision Family Food Kit is designed to feed a family of four for one week. They contain: 15 kilograms of rice, 10 tins of sardines, 2.5 kilograms of biscuits, 1 kilogram of mung beans, 1 liter of cooking oil, 6 liters of water, and 1 kilogram of brown sugar.

      Here’s what our USA-bought version of that kit looked like:

      We're cheap, and that's good | World Vision Blog

       

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        [Video] Rose's Planet Earth

        Post Summary: 

        Less than two weeks ago, for the people of the central islands of the Philippines, this beautiful planet turned harsh and scary. Now, the survivors of Typhoon Haiyan look ahead toward recovery with hope.

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        Sponsored child Rose Tajano, who is now living with her family in an elementary school, and the Batican family, living in a reassembled structure of bamboo, are among the 45,000 families that World Vision is helping in the Leyte and Samar areas of the Philippines.

        Today's video tells their stories and where their hope lies for their future.

         

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          [Photoblog] Smiles of relief

          Post Summary: 

          On Thursday morning, World Vision completed a well-organized and calm distribution of food and hygiene kits in northern Cebu, benefiting 780 families, nearly 4,000 people.

          This series of photos comes directly from our team on the ground in the Philippines, showing the smiles that this first distribution of relief supplies brought to the waiting survivors of Typhoon Haiyan.

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          [Photoblog] Smiles of relief | World Vision Blog

          Typhoon survivors in Estancia, left with nothing, await the arrival of relief supplies. (Photo: 2013 World Vision)

           

           

          [Photoblog] Smiles of relief | World Vision Blog

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            Voice of survivors: "I was shivering and looking at flying roofs"

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            In the devastating wake of Typhoon Haiyan (locally named Yolanda), a small table in a cramped village hall serves as baby Patrick’s new home. Curled in a corner, baby Patrick is in a deep sleep, unaware of what just happened in his hometown.

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            His mother, Rowena, sitting outside the hall that now shelters families left homeless from the storm, listens to a World Vision staff member speaking with a village official. After a few minutes, baby Patrick makes a sound. Rowena comes inside and rocks him back to sleep slowly in her arms. When all is quiet again, she puts him back in the middle of the table to keep him from falling.

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              Recovering childhood in a safe space

              Post Summary: 

              When Teerasak's home in Thailand flooded, his world was turned upside-down. Now, at a World Vision Child-Friendly Space, he and 40 other children have found a place where they can learn, play, talk about their experiences, and simply be kids again.

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              Teerasak transforms a blank piece of paper into a colorful canvas. The second-grade student is creating an unusual masterpiece -- drawing an upside-down boat that has three wheels, multi-colored clouds, and a smattering of raindrops. The drawing also shows his house, flipped upside-down, too, standing on its roof.

              The drawing reflects exactly the situation Teerasak finds himself in.

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                Philippines: Youth active in disaster preparedness

                After Typhoon Washi hit the Philippines in 2011, many communities began participating in World Vision's child-focused disaster risk reduction training.

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                  Syrian refugee family: “We all want to be free”

                  Last month, World Vision U.S. President Rich Stearns and a writer/photographer team visited Syrian refugees in Jordan.

                  Today, World Vision writer Sevil Omer captures their experience speaking with families living in the Za'atari Refugee Camp.

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                    An aid worker's diary: Earthquake in the Philippines

                    Maryann Zamora, a field communications specialist with World Vision in the Philippines, describes her firsthand experience of the 7.2-magnitude earthquake that struck the Philippines on October 15 -- and why she continues to do the work she does, despite her fears.

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