Earthquake devastates Nepal

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Why should Christians care about Syria?

Post Summary: 

In today’s blog, we ask a variety of Christian thought leaders why we as Christians should care about the conflict in Syria, a crisis that day to day often feels very far from us. Or someone else’s problem.

Hear what seven writers have to say about this question, including bloggers Ron Edmondson and Matthew Paul Turner, and our very own president, Rich Stearns.

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Rich Stearns, World Vision U.S. president

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    South Sudan conflict: Left in danger

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    Medina and Margret are just two among hundreds of thousands in South Sudan who have been driven from their homes by the fighting that escalated last month. Left with little in a disrupted economy, they want to take their families away from the conflict but can’t afford to, leaving them to seek sanctuary wherever they can. Read the story of these two families, and learn what World Vision is doing to help.

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    Medina Hilary, 18, has spent four days in the Catholic Church compound after being uprooted by fear and insecurity from her home in Lologo, a suburb of Juba, South Sudan. Seated with her 1-year-old son on a mat, Medina has been running into the church because of fighting between the army of South Sudan and opposition forces within Juba town.

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      Five things you need to know about Syria's refugee crisis

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      Now in its third winter, the toll of the Syrian refugee crisis continues to rise. Here are five facts you should know about this crisis, and what World Vision is doing to help.

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      Later this month, international peace talks are scheduled to convene to seek a political solution to the conflict in Syria. The aim of the conference is for the Syrian government and its opposition to sign on to a plan for a transitional government leading to elections.

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        The Apple of my eye

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        Today marks two months since Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the Philippines. After the storm, World Vision communicator Annila Harris visited survivors and met sponsored child Apple, whose family is benefiting from World Vision relief supplies. The way this little girl cared for her baby sister, Roalyn, taught Annila that even when a disaster takes away almost everything, the most important thing in life is still family.

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        Looking up at the clear blue sky, it was hard to picture the pouring rain and surging winds on the day that Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines.

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          Aid worker’s blog: Each other’s miracle

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          Wednesday marks two months since Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the Philippines, causing immense devastation and loss of life. World Vision quickly mobilized more than 200 local staff members to help reach almost 400,000 survivors with relief operations.

          Today, Florence, one of our team members on the ground, reflects on the past two months and the amazing love and hope she has felt from around the world as we all became each other’s miracle.

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          This is the Filipino spirit. I’ve seen this in the families I’ve talked to, and I have heard these lines from the many parents who still manage to smile despite their losses.

          Typhoon Haiyan undeniably brought devastation in its most gruesome face. I can tell you hundreds of these stories. Being part of the communications team, I get the chance to talk to people, listen to mothers cry, empathize with fathers’ fears, and feel for children who are adjusting.

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            Day 16: Share a meal

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            World Vision is sharing joy across the United States by providing Family Food Kits to people who are going hungry because of natural disasters, homelessness, or job loss. Learn more with today’s video.

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            Today’s challenge: Share a meal with a friend (or invite a friend over).

             

            “Dear friends, let us love one another, for love comes from God. Everyone who loves has been born of God and knows God.” —1 John 4:7 (NIV)

             

            Shipping love to the hungry

            In 2010, the United States had the second-highest rate of childhood poverty among the 25 wealthiest industrialized nations. Across America, families go hungry every day because of natural disasters, unemployment, or homelessness.

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              Memories of Tacloban

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              Chris Weeks, from World Vision United Kingdom, describes his first experience of the devastated city of Tacloban in the Philippines. Now two weeks after the storm hit, relief efforts are well underway and reaching the survivors that need them while the people of Tacloban are finding the strength to begin rebuilding their city.

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              My sole memories of Tacloban are from the last 24 hours. Anyone who’s seen the city, two weeks after Typhoon Haiyan ferociously tore it to the ground, will never forget it.

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                We're cheap, and that's good

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                One of World Vision’s primary responses to disasters like Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines is the distribution of Family Food Kits and Hygiene Kits to survivors. On our Facebook page this week, we posted photos of the contents of these kits – but purchased here in the USA – and asked our followers to guess how much the items would cost. That price versus the price of each World Vision Kit might surprise you!

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                Each World Vision Family Food Kit is designed to feed a family of four for one week. They contain: 15 kilograms of rice, 10 tins of sardines, 2.5 kilograms of biscuits, 1 kilogram of mung beans, 1 liter of cooking oil, 6 liters of water, and 1 kilogram of brown sugar.

                Here’s what our USA-bought version of that kit looked like:

                We're cheap, and that's good | World Vision Blog

                 

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                  [Video] Rose's Planet Earth

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                  Less than two weeks ago, for the people of the central islands of the Philippines, this beautiful planet turned harsh and scary. Now, the survivors of Typhoon Haiyan look ahead toward recovery with hope.

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                  Sponsored child Rose Tajano, who is now living with her family in an elementary school, and the Batican family, living in a reassembled structure of bamboo, are among the 45,000 families that World Vision is helping in the Leyte and Samar areas of the Philippines.

                  Today's video tells their stories and where their hope lies for their future.

                   

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                    [Photoblog] Smiles of relief

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                    On Thursday morning, World Vision completed a well-organized and calm distribution of food and hygiene kits in northern Cebu, benefiting 780 families, nearly 4,000 people.

                    This series of photos comes directly from our team on the ground in the Philippines, showing the smiles that this first distribution of relief supplies brought to the waiting survivors of Typhoon Haiyan.

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                    [Photoblog] Smiles of relief | World Vision Blog

                    Typhoon survivors in Estancia, left with nothing, await the arrival of relief supplies. (Photo: 2013 World Vision)

                     

                     

                    [Photoblog] Smiles of relief | World Vision Blog

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