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Moriah’s child

Post Summary: 

“The Easter story is a story of justice and the length that someone would go to bring justice to the world.”

See how a brand-new child sponsorship is helping to bring justice, happiness, and joy to a little girl in Zambia this Lenten season.

***

For Moriah Rees, it had been an awkward conversation—one that left her uncertain.

“Ever since I started working at World Vision, people would ask me, ‘Do you have a sponsored child?’ I tried. I looked on the web and didn’t connect with any of the children. I asked myself, ‘What’s wrong with me?’”

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    Forever changed by clean water

    Post Summary: 

    This summer, blogger Rachel Teodoro traveled with us to Uganda to dedicate a new clean water borehole for one of our communities.

    Through her eyes, witness the energy and pure joy that the people of this community felt at having clean water, and see how they will be forever changed by it.

    ***

    I was crying before we even got out of the van. The crowd was at least 200 strong. We could hear the singing. We could feel the joy from the songs being sung. Words we didn't know, sounds we weren't familiar with, but smiles and expressions that didn't require the same language to understand that they radiated a thankfulness and joy unlike any I had heard. There were mothers with babies on their hips and children of all ages. Even men stopped their afternoon work and came out to this celebration. They were gathered to dedicate a borehole.

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      Quenching more than thirst

      Post Summary: 

      While traveling in India, blogger Amy Bellgardt visited a World Vision water program and was so inspired that she became one of our World Vision Bloggers!

      See how clean water is helping to empower women in India … and how these programs inspired Amy.

      ***

      How many times do you turn on a water faucet each day?

      Have you ever thought about it?

      Think about each time you visit the restroom, wash your hands, take a bath or shower, wash food, laundry … the number will likely be quite high. That is just you, too. Factor in your family members and you’ve easily used  gallons and gallons used every single day.

      The ease and convenience of clean water is literally right at our fingertips.

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        Benny’s smile

        Post Summary: 

        Meet Benny in Zambia … a father who smiles because his family no longer has to worry about dirty water!

        Read his story and see how clean water is helping this community expand their church.

        ***

        Today I hold a brick in my hands and a smile in my heart. They both come from the same person: Benny Hampande.

        Benny’s smile is not the kind of smile you often see coming from a man who lives in rural Africa. I’ve met fathers all across Africa and around the world for whom the burden of parenthood is draining. Worrying and working to help a family survive every day can sap a man’s energy and enthusiasm. So can having children who are constantly sick and a wife who is always bone tired.

        Benny’s life is different.

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          Now, they can drink

          Post Summary: 

          Pastor and author Max Lucado has spent his career bringing the living water of the Gospel to the world.

          Max is also a long-time partner of World Vision, and this winter hosted a social fundraiser hoping to bring clean water to 20,000 people in Ethiopia.

          See how many people will receive clean water through Max and his readers …

          ***

          Now, they can drink | World Vision Blog
          Photo: 2009 Jon Warren/World Vision

          It was hard to forget the muddy water.

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            Defying the norm

            Post Summary: 

            In Africa, drilling for water is typically a man's job.

            But Lucie Bibata Dembele is defying this norm, managing two of World Vision's drilling rigs and the 6-men teams that operate them!

            See what it's like to be a woman in this role.

            ***

            When a village in Africa receives a well that brings clean water, it’s women and children who often spend hours every day carrying water who benefit the most. But it is usually men who design and build the water systems.

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              PHOTOBLOG: A sick girl gets clean water

              Post Summary: 

              Dorcas is 9 and lives in the Bulanda community in Zambia.

              When World Vision first met her, she was gathering water four times each day from a disgusting water hole, in which animals sometimes died. Dorcas was often sick with diarrhea.

              But life is turning around for Dorcas! See the change in her life through photos.

              ***

              This water hole in Zambia was the only source of drinking water for the people of Bulanda. When this photo was taken last summer, two cows had recently fallen in, and the people had discovered dog fur floating in it—when they dug around the bottom with a stick, a dead, decaying dog had risen to the surface.

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                A not-so-simple cup of tea

                Post Summary: 

                While traveling with World Vision in Kenya last summer, bestselling author Debbie Macomber met Veronica, a mother of 7, who served her a simple cup of tea.

                Behind that cup of tea was a long and difficult journey because getting something as simple as the water for the tea was challenging.

                See the difference that clean water makes through Debbie's eyes.

                ***

                I had a delicious cup of tea last summer, the memory of which I will hold for the remainder of my days. It wasn't an ordinary tea bought in a store. This was a special tea called Kenya Tea. I went to great lengths for that simple cup of tea, lengths that included a trip halfway around the world.

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                  Pleading for clean water

                  Post Summary: 

                  When we talk about people not having access to clean water, what does that really mean?

                  For the people of Bulanda, Zambia, it meant finding the fur of a drowned dog (and then the dog itself) in their only source of drinking water.

                  Read about the challenges that come without clean water, and this community's prayers and pleas for water … and an answer!

                  ***

                  The place: southern Zambia. We’d spent the day at one of the most hideous water sources I’d ever seen.

                  This water was dirty.

                  A dog had recently drowned there, drinking water from the hole. No one knew it had happened until dog fur floated to the surface of the water. That’s when villagers poked around the bottom of the hole with a long stick and found the remains of the dog, caught under a tree root.

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                    The hard questions

                    Post Summary: 

                    Tragedy is all too common around the world. Can World Vision really make a difference? Can we serve the poor in difficult situations?

                    See how our clean water and sanitation programs answer these hard questions with, "Yes."

                    ***

                    Some things are hard to understand. For example, a boy who has difficulty walking and can’t play his favorite game of soccer or the grief of a woman whose daughter drowns in an open well. During a recent trip to Malawi, I witnessed both of these tragedies. This is the story of Julius, whose mobility was affected by a childhood illness, and Doreen Sakala, a mother who lost her 13-year-old daughter.

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