A poem to an unknown mother

    World Vision's Elda Spaho writes about child protection and the programs World Vision supports in Albania that help abused and abandoned children. Read Catherine's story and the poem she wrote to her absent mother.

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      A vision of opportunity for child laborers

      Combating forced labor is part of World Vision’s holistic approach to protecting children and ensuring that every child has the opportunity to experience life in all its fullness.

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        A modern-day slave’s second chance

        The International Labor Organization estimates that at least 20.9 million men, women, and children around the world suffer in forced labor, though the actual number could be closer to 27 million. Further, 55 percent of victims of forced labor are women, and girls comprise 98 percent of sex trafficking victims.

        Chanty* was one of them -- but now she has a second chance.

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          Why World Vision? Life in all its fullness

          Around the world, there are 115 million children trapped in hazardous child labor, and millions more are victims of abuse and other forms of exploitation. Under such conditions, children cannot experience fullness of life. World Vision works to protect children by preventing exploitation and abuse, by restoring children that have been abused, and by speaking out about child protection issues.

          Today’s infographic illustrates our work in this sector.

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            Sumi's journey from horror to new hope

            In February, advocates won a huge victory when the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA) passed Congress with broad bipartisan support. The TVPRA allowed the U.S. government to partner with the government of Bangladesh to pass its own anti-trafficking law in 2012.

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              [Video] Melka's story: Child bride to advocate for girls

              We first brought you the story of Melka in Ethiopia last year. Today, we're excited to present this video depiction of the remarkable young woman's journey.

              Melka was 14 years old when, to her surprise, her parents married her off to an older man from another village whom she didn't even know. When Melka resisted him later that evening, he and his friends beat her severely. She woke up in the hospital.

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                Only a child, but already a man

                More than 10,000 Cambodians cross the border into Thailand every day to earn a living. Among the throng of workers and peddlers are children like Horm, who gathers recyclable trash and sells his gleanings at Rong Kluea market.

                He is only 10, but he already works like a man. Between his rounds, he drops by a World Vision learning center to play. It is at this center where he experiences just a few moments of being a child.

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                  Saved from early marriage at age 10

                  Today's post brings us a story of tragedy turned to hope from Ethiopia, where 10-year-old Masresha was forced into early marriage by her family. In many developing countries, this is a harsh reality faced by young girls, as depicted in the film Girl Rising.

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                  “I had no idea of the marriage. I didn’t know who I was to marry. I didn’t expect that my grandmother would do such a thing to me,” Masresha explains.

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                    Q&A with an [almost] child bride

                    Shapla in Bangladesh was devastated when her parents arranged a marriage that would force her to drop out of school.

                    But thanks to World Vision, when Shapla told her friends about her situation, they knew what to do. Shapla's friends had completed a life-skills education course, and they were able to contact community leaders, who advocated for Shapla.

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