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Recent Posts By Kari Costanza

Margaret in my heart

Margaret in my heart | World Vision Blog

Margaret, writer Kari Costanza's friend from Uganda. (Photo: Kari Costanza/World Vision)

Our wonderful writer Kari Costanza reflects today in memoriam of her friend Margaret from Uganda on her recent return trip to Gulu.

Read how World Vision sponsors brought joy and fresh hope to the families Kari visited, as they had to Margaret, and how memories of their friendship strengthened Kari on her trip.

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda | World Vision Blog

3-year-old Sharon in Uganda wears an earring – to protect her from child sacrifice. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

In certain districts of Uganda, child sacrifice is a real danger. Today, Kari Costanza writes from Uganda about 3-year-old Sharon, whose ear piercing may protect her.

Read how a World Vision-supported amber alert program is helping to recover children that have been taken.

Friday night in the testing hut

Friday night in the testing hut | World Vision Blog

Asumani, 13, and a health worker in Uganda. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

On Friday, Asumani came down with malaria. Our writer Kari Costanza is in Uganda right now and was visiting the health center when Asumani came in. She witnessed World Vision's rapid testing system for malaria at work … and how it saved Asumani's life. See what just happened!

A safe harbor

A safe harbor | World Vision Blog

Delfina (red shirt) and friends under the safe harbor of a mosquito net that Delfina's family received from World Vision. (Photo: 2012 Jon Warren/World Vision)

World Vision writer Kari Costanza reflects on taking sanctuary in her church's parking lot while being stuck in a snow storm last weekend, and how World Vision and our supporters are able to provide a safe harbor for millions of children around the world.

The best meal I ever ate

The best meal I ever ate | World Vision Blog

Yolanda (blue apron) works at her taco stand, made possible through a Vision Fund microloan. (©2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Happy Thanksgiving! Today, World Vision writer Kari Costanza describes the best meal she ever had, in San Mateo, Mexico — where a VisionFund microloan empowered Kari's hosts, Yolanda and Silverio, to open a taco stand and better support their family.

Nicholas and Nikolaus

World Vision writer Kari Costanza contrasts the life of her son, Nicholas, with the life of a young man she met in Tanzania, named Nikolaus. Both college-aged, her son Nicholas is in college pursuing his dreams; Nikolaus and his family are struggling to have hope for the future.

Find out how World Vision's programs will soon offer Nikolaus that hope.

East of Eden

Today is World Vision's annual Day of Prayer. To mark the beginning of our new fiscal year, staff members all across the globe gather together to spend the day in prayer and fellowship.

For today's post, World Vision writer Kari Costanza reflects on the need for prayer around the world. Join us.

The gossamer thread, part 2: A different story

Today is World Malaria Day! Join World Vision in remembering the lives devastated by this preventable, treatable disease -- and in our mission of eradicating it from the world.

Yesterday, part 1 of "The gossamer thread" brought you into the lives of three families who have seen malaria's tragic effects firsthand. Today's story is decidedly more hopeful: It highlights the miraculous change a few square meters of netting has brought about for another Mozambican family.

The gossamer thread, part 1: Three families

Tomorrow is World Malaria Day -- a moment to remember the lives of children, families, and communities devastated by this preventable, treatable disease that we can stop.

Today, we open a two-part series with the stories of three families in Mozambique who have been affected by malaria. Make sure you check back tomorrow to read about a family whose lives have been transformed by the simple miracle of bed nets.

The net effect of deadly malaria

Marita Adelino is not your average 10-year-old.

In a world where children typically want so much, she wants only two things -- a best friend and a mosquito net. Yearning for a friend is sketched across her face, a portrait of loneliness.

And the desire for a mosquito net? Marita is terrified of the tiny, sinister creatures that spread malaria, the disease that killed her best friend, Marta João, last year.

Who's that girl?

"Who’s that girl?" I wondered while watching Carter’s Chord, a sister band who recently traveled to the Dominican Republic to create a video of their song, "Love a Little Bigger."

I love the song and its message: how blessed we are and how a luxury, like drinking a $4 cup of coffee, can make us feel guilty, especially when we are confronted by pictures of the poor.

Being from Seattle, the coffee center of the universe, I can relate.

The video is beautiful. The Carter’s Chord sisters are lovely. Their voices are wonderful. The Dominican Republic is an astonishing country, dripping with tropical delight.

But the prettiest thing in the video is its little star -- a girl whose life they captured from her early-morning routine, waking up and rubbing the sleep from her eyes, through the moment where she seemed to take flight -- dancing with the Carter’s Chord sisters as they sang.

Why did I pray?

World Vision's Kari Costanza traveled to Rwanda, where she met Solange, whose life was turned upside-down in a short period of time.

Fighting caused Solange and her family flee their home in the Democratic Republic of Congo. After arriving in Kiegeme refugee camp, Solange lost her 3-year-old daughter, Rebecca.

Kari met Solange in a hospital, where she was staying with her baby, Esther. Kari shares her thoughts on meeting Solange and Esther -- and the tragic news she received after returning to the United States.

Malaria: The disease that silences laughter

Today, I bought a coffin.

We spent the morning in a village in Mozambique visiting Marita, a dear little girl whose best friend had died of malaria last year.

Marita was still grieving. She sat quietly while the rest of the children played in high spirits, shouting and laughing through a game of soccer.

Marita’s mother invited us to come back later for supper. Hospitality can never be refused, even when the givers have so little. Marita’s father makes just $48 a year in a country to which both people and nature have been unkind.