Recent Posts By Eugene Lee, WV publications

[Photo blog] 12 moments from 2012

World Vision staff around the globe shot more than 10,000 photos this year. Working in nearly 100 countries, they documented the year’s most urgent humanitarian emergencies as well as moments of inner strength and joy. Here are 12 memorable photos from 2012.

Got an iPhone? Find World Vision!

iPhone users can now stay in touch with World Vision and keep up to date with humanitarian issues and emergency response news through World Vision Now, our new iPhone app!

It's easy to find -- just search for "World Vision Now" in the App Store on your iPhone, and look for our orange icon.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions.

Operation Seasweep: A 32-year story of God's provision

Thirty-two years ago, World Vision reported the rescue story of Operation Seasweep, the boat Mr. Vinh Chung was on, in the August 1979 issue of World Vision Magazine. Mr. Chung recently retold his story at our headquarters office. I spoke with him afterward for a fuller picture of his life after Seasweep and the miracle of God's provision for his family.


Two very different parts of Vinh Chung’s life meet when he walks on a beach.

In an instant, the smell of sea salt takes the 36-year-old skin cancer surgeon back to his 1979 exodus from Vietnam.

Just four years old at the time, Vinh recalls fleeing the southern city of Ca Mau by boat from the Mekong River Delta toward the South China Sea with his parents and seven siblings.

The Chung family -- ethnically Chinese -- escaped the communist government’s persecution of ethnic minorities.

Once they reached the open ocean, Thai pirates stole their valuables. Their boat eventually made it to a Malaysian beach, but instead of offering asylum, soldiers held them at gunpoint and brutally beat Vinh’s father and uncle. Then they were towed back out to sea on a smaller boat with no working motor or fuel. They were left to die.

Now, the work begins

Editor's note: The World Vision family is comprised of thousands of staff members from various personal, professional, and spiritual backgrounds -- each of whom has a unique story of being led to our ministry. To highlight this diversity, we're starting a monthly series in which a different World Vision staff person will share "what working at World Vision means to me."

Growing up as one of the only Asian Americans in my predominately white neighborhood, I was often on the receiving end of racial slurs.

This left me angry and confused. I often felt misplaced.

In college, I began to ask questions about my family’s past. I hoped to find something that would explain all the childhood teasing and bullying.

In this search I discovered Malcolm X, a civil rights activist who found himself in being a voice for the voiceless. I believed that I, too, could express my family’s American experience and be heard.

Representing the marginalized and the oppressed became my call; writing and photography became my tools.

Over the past 10 years, I’ve had a wide variety of seemingly random editorial jobs. I always wondered how it would come together in a focused way.

When my wife and I decided to move to Seattle to be closer to family, I applied to work at World Vision on a whim earlier this year, as other options were not working out.