Recent Posts By Abby Stalsbroten

A lucky orphan gets a goat

A Lucky Orphan Gets a Goat | World Vision Blog

Abdul, 15, and his uncle with one of the goats the received through World Vision's Gift Catalog. (Photo: 2013 Abby Stalsbroten/World Vision)

Orphaned at the age of 3, Abdul in Sierra Leone has grown up with his uncle's family. When World Vision came to his community, his family grew when he was sponsored. Read how Abdul's life – and the lives of his whole family and community – has been improved through sponsorship and World Vision's Gift Catalog!

José's story: A storehouse volunteer

José Barron, 22, began volunteering two days a week at the World Vision Storehouse in Fife, Washington, two years ago.

“I like volunteering here because I notice that I love working with people,” José says. “I love my job. Coming here has changed my life.”

You're gonna graduate in whatever you do

World Vision Photographer Abby Stalsbroten learned what it takes to change a life at the Children's Defense Fund Conference last week.  At the conference she met Anthony, a participant in World Vision's Youth Empowerment Program.  As a teenager, Anthony was headed down a destructive path. His father was in prison, and he joined a gang in middle school.  Now at 23, Anthony is an inspirational speaker, and an example to young men in his community. Read on to learn what altered Anthony's path.

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Photo stories from Swaziland

World Vision photographer Abby Stalsbroten traveled last week to Swaziland with a group of pastors from Austin, Texas, to look at the impact of sponsorship on children in rural communities. The country has a 24-percent HIV infection rate, but World Vision is working to feed and care for thousands of orphaned and vulnerable children across the country. Here are some of Abby's favorite pictures from the past week in the field.

Modern times, ancient stories

Editor's note: Abby Stalsbroten will be in Kenya with World Vision March 25-April 8.

John Steinbeck is one of my favorite authors. Right now I’m reading his classic, The Grapes of Wrath, about the migration of farmers in the 1930s from the Midwest to California and the downward spiral of poverty they endured along the way. A central theme of the novel is hunger. It focuses around one family and their search for work and food in increasingly desperate conditions.

[caption id="attachment_3133" align="alignright" width="210"] In the Horn of Africa, this family has had to survive on only one meal a day. (Lucy Murunga/WV/2011)[/caption]

He writes, “How can you frighten a man whose hunger is not only in his own cramped stomach but in the wretched bellies of his children? You can’t scare him — he has known a fear beyond every other.”

Over and over again as I read this book, I want to feel safe in the assumption that this happened in the wake of the Great Depression and be glad that all that is behind us now -- that the “fear beyond every other” is a distant and conquered one.