Tag Archives: Why World Vision stories

Why World Vision? For so many reasons

For the past 11 weeks, we’ve brought you an in-depth look into World Vision’s work around the world and why it’s effective. I had been working for World Vision for less than three months at the time we began this series, so developing all of this this content has been an amazing learning opportunity -- and a steep learning curve!

José's story: A storehouse volunteer

José Barron, 22, began volunteering two days a week at the World Vision Storehouse in Fife, Washington, two years ago.

“I like volunteering here because I notice that I love working with people,” José says. “I love my job. Coming here has changed my life.”

Rita's story: Standing strong against hunger

John Iwasaki, senior writer for World Vision's U.S. Programs, tells the story of Rita Lujan, a cancer survivor who struggles to make ends meet for her family. With the help of World Vision food kits, Rita is standing strong: "God doesn't give you more than you can chew."

Yemi’s story: empowering youth toward change

Penn State sophomore and World Vision Youth Empowerment Program (YEP) alumna Yemi Olugbuyi is motivating other students to create positive change in their lives and communities.

During the past school semester, Yemi started a YEP chapter on the Penn State campus in Schuylkill, Pennsylvania. YEP focuses on helping youth develop skills in leadership, civic engagement, critical thinking, advocacy, and team building.

[Photos] Rebuilding Tuscaloosa

As I saw images from Moore, Oklahoma, flash across my screen in May, I was immediately brought back to similar scenes of devastation that took place in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, in 2011. I thought about how World Vision was just finishing up its disaster response to that deadly tornado, two years after it touched down.

Syrian refugee crisis: The true value of water

What do you know about water?

Before I went to Lebanon, I knew that it is life-saving and that clean water is key to preventing diseases. But I never realized how much its value extends beyond that. I never understood the dignity and comfort that it can offer people in hard times -- until this past month.

Syrian refugee crisis: Three things you should know

Joy Toose, social media manager for World Vision Australia, spent a month reporting from Lebanon about the Syrian refugees who fled there to escape violence in their home country. Today, she shares three things that she learned about the refugee crisis that you should know, too.

A vision of opportunity for child laborers

Combating forced labor is part of World Vision’s holistic approach to protecting children and ensuring that every child has the opportunity to experience life in all its fullness. World Vision works to address the root causes of child labor and create opportunities for affected children to get an education and leave jobs that are often dangerous, dirty, and degrading.

Today, we present the stories of two boys whose lives as child laborers are turning toward new opportunities through World Vision programs.

A modern-day slave’s second chance

The International Labor Organization estimates that at least 20.9 million men, women, and children around the world suffer in forced labor, though the actual number could be closer to 27 million. Further, 55 percent of victims of forced labor are women, and girls comprise 98 percent of sex trafficking victims.

Chanty* was one of them -- but now she has a second chance.

Shared visions and big returns: The multiplying impact of advocacy

Today, Jesse Eaves, World Vision's senior policy adviser for child protection in Washington, D.C., describes how child sponsorship is an investment in a child's future, and how advocacy -- speaking out on behalf of those affected by poverty and injustice -- increases the return on that investment.

Giving life with World Vision Micro

Katie Swift, marketing project administrator for World Vision Micro, tells the story of Sam Mai, an entrepreneur from Cambodia who changed her life and the lives of her children through two World Vision microloans.

Anis: a young farmer from Alor

Yohanes, 17, usually called Anis, is a sponsored child from Alor, Indonesia, with a talent for gardening. His father left during his childhood, and his mother is visually impaired. Living through these troubles has made him resilient. He has a dream to become a farmer who is not only useful for his family but also for his community. Through World Vision’s support, Anis has been a sponsored child since he was in the second grade, and his family received roofing and piping for their home four years ago.