Tag Archives: U.S. poverty

Freedom from hunger

Freedom from hunger | World Vision Blog

Calden, 3, holds a Family Food Kit from World Vision after Hurricane Isaac. (Photo: 2012 Laura Reinhardt/World Vision)

As we celebrate our nation's freedom tomorrow, many hardworking Americans remain bound by hunger – including almost 16 million children.

Today, World Vision writer John Iwasaki describes how our U.S. Programs are working to help bring freedom from hunger to families across our nation.

World Vision’s teacher resource center: like Christmas for teachers

I love it when I get to visit any of World Vision’s teacher resource centers in cities across the United States. Maybe it’s because it reminds me of that sense of excitement I felt when I started a new school year, with my brand-new book bag filled with untouched notebooks and unsharpened pencils.

Building backpacks: A tangible demonstration of God's love

One of the great joys in my job is getting to meet many of World Vision's great church partners. I met one of these church heroes at a Renton, Washington, church. His name is Alex.

He told his congregation that God had planted them right in the midst of people whom they wouldn’t reach if they didn’t get out of the church pews.

So, Alex walked across the street and introduced himself to members of the staff at Northwood Middle School. This began a partnership with the school in which people from the church mentor students, and the church also hosts a year-end celebration of the teachers.

Hunger at home: Five surprising facts on child hunger in America

Recently, a woman approached me and asked if I could spare change for a meal. Without thinking, I said, "I'm sorry, I don't have any money."

My cheeks automatically flushed with embarrassment, and my heart sank. I had meant to say I didn't have cash to give her. It was completely obvious that a lack of money wasn't something I was dealing with.

It was my birthday. I had spent the day exploring downtown Seattle and shopping with my friends. We were just leaving a restaurant, shopping bags in hand, when the woman approached.

Walking back to our car, I was ashamed at the thoughtlessness of my comment. But the uncomfortable pit in my stomach wasn't just that. I was faced with this woman's needs. It hurt to see her lacking something she needed. I felt guilty for what I had. The sadness of the moment lingered with me.

The truth is, hunger is all around us -- even right here in the United States -- and it affects more people than we would like to believe. This woman made her need obvious to me. But hunger is often invisible. When we don't want to see it, hunger's power to harm people only grows.

One of the saddest realities of hunger is that the people most vulnerable to its harmful effects are children. Growing and developing without proper nutrition can impact a child for life. Many people believe that American children are immune to hunger because of school feeding programs.

But the reality is a much bleaker picture. Here are five facts on children facing hunger in America.

Remembering families in the U.S. this New Year

Every year about this time, I list goals for the upcoming year -- new year resolutions, if you will. I know it’s kind of cheesy, but I love that feeling of starting fresh.

Then, I think about some of the families I’ve met in my work as a World Vision communicator in the United States, and I realize that they don’t have time to think about these kinds of goals.

For many U.S. families living in poverty, it's a struggle just to provide food and shelter for their loved ones.

One such family is the Cutrights from West Virginia.

Report: U.S. poverty rate at highest level since 1993

For some time now, the struggling U.S. economy has dominated headlines and shaped conversation among Americans. New data released Tuesday in a report from the U.S. Census Bureau, "Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States (pdf)," paints an even starker picture of the challenges our nation faces:

  • The U.S. poverty rate rose to 15.1 percent in 2010 -- up from 14.3 percent in 2009, and to its highest level since 1993.
  • About 46.2 million people are now considered in poverty -- 2.6 million more than last year. That's nearly 1 in 6 people.
  • More Americans were living in poverty in 2010 than at any time since at least the 1950s.
  • The situation has hit black populations the hardest, with their poverty rate rising from 25.8 percent to 27.4 percent.
  • Meanwhile, child poverty rose from 20.7 percent to 22 percent.