Tag Archives: The Hole In Our Gospel

The Hole in Our Gospel, five years later

The Hole in Our Gospel, five years later | World Vision Blog

The five-year anniversary special edition of The Hole in Our Gospel includes a 16-page full color infograph section illustrating poverty and church trends. (Photo: The Hole in Our Gospel)

Today, Rich Stearns – president of World Vision U.S. – releases a special edition of his book The Hole in Our Gospel, marking five years since its original publication.

Read an excerpt sharing how the fight against global poverty has changed over the past five years, and what our call is today and for the future.

Two churches, two sundays (excerpt from Unfinished)

This past Tuesday, Rich Stearns -- president of World Vision U.S. and best-selling author of The Hole in our Gospel -- launched his second book: Unfinished: Believing Is Only The Beginning.

Below is an excerpt from the book, which explores God's plan for the world and how each and every one of us is called to a unique role in that mission.

[Book Launch] Unfinished: Why believing is only the beginning

The Gospels present a sweeping, holistic view of the lives Jesus calls us to lead as His followers. But modern-day Christianity tends to sell this message short: We go about our daily routines believing that if we live morally, respect each other, and believe in Christ, we’re all set.

Unfinished, the latest book by Richard Stearns, president of World Vision U.S., presents a more complete model for what it means to follow Christ: “Believing is only the beginning.”

Following Coach Richt to Honduras -- a trip that changes lives

Special thanks to Steve Hummer, Sunday sports feature writer at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, for guest-blogging this post for us. Following the UGA sports blog's May 25 post and our May 31 post, Steve joined University of Georgia football coach Mark Richt and his wife, Katharyn, in Honduras to witness World Vision's work there.


World Vision? What’s that? An optician with delusions of grandeur? A new psychic helpline? A few months ago, I had no idea.

Then there came a curious off-season story from the most watched sports beat here at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution: University of Georgia football. Bulldogs fans were all atwitter over a report that head coach Mark Richt had put his vacation lake home up for sale. That prompted wide speculation that after two disappointing seasons he was selling off as a hedge against the possibility of being fired this year.

'The Hole In Our Gospel' inspires football coach to sell his home

My email inbox is notorious for housing second-hand articles from my colleagues about new technology, philanthropy, trends in new media, or nonprofit stories -- my typical work-related interests. But last week, several work friends sent me the UGA Sports Blog article, "Mark Richt sells Lake Hartwell property."

When I first started reading it, I was thinking that my colleagues who sent me this must think I'm an avid Georgia sports fan, even though I went to college in California, and have never even visited Georgia (nor do I keep up with college football). My short attention span had just about given up on the article when I read this paragraph about half way down:

“Within the last year, I read this book, “The Hole in Our Gospel,” written by Richard Stearns. He’s the president of World Vision U.S. I think people understand who World Vision is but, basically, they help the poor. Through their organization, you can help children, you can help build wells, you can buy them donkeys, whatever people need. World Vision helps people across the world. Well, anyway, there was a lot of statistical data in there about the amount of people that live on a dollar a day around this world. Billions of people. So I’m reading this book and it really affected me. It helped me realize that what we have is way more than we need and that our ability to give is hindered by this property. I guess that’s the best way to tell you. We just wanted to be in a better position to give and bless people that don’t have anything. We felt like this was one way to be able to do that.”