Tag Archives: refugees

Opening our hearts to the little children

Opening our hearts to the little children | World Vision Blog

Reflecting on the humanitarian crisis of vulnerable children along the U. S. border, Rich Stearns – president of World Vision U.S. – writes that, following Jesus, "the best solutions come from a compassionate heart."

Children suffer most in South Sudan

Children suffer most in South Sudan | World Vision Blog

As conflict ravages South Sudan, the nation’s children are bearing the brunt of the crisis: separated from their families, hungry and malnourished, not in school, and at risk of abuse and exploitation.

Michael Arunga, World Vision emergency communications advisor for Africa, looks back at the brief history of South Sudan and reflects on how this new nation came to its current situation.

World Vision brings children together

World Vision brings children together | World Vision Blog

Syrian refugee children attend World Vision classes in Jordan. (Photo: 2013: Jon Warren/World Vision)

For World Refugee Day today, we're highlighting our Child-Friendly Spaces, which are helping Syrian refugee children play and smile again after the trauma they've been through.

Read about a small building tucked into a back street in downtown Irbid, Jordan, where World Vision is helping to bridge the gap between Syrian refugee children and vulnerable kids in Jordan.

Azraq: A new home for Syrian refugees

Azraq: A new home for Syrian refugees | World Vision Blog

Azraq refugee camp in Jordan, where up to 100,000 Syrian refugees will begin living this week. (Photo: 2014 Robert Neufeld/World Vision)

World Vision has been a key player in developing the Azraq Refugee Camp in Jordan, which later this week will begin housing up to 100,000 Syrian refugees. Clean water, sanitation facilities, schools, playgrounds, a supermarket and a hospital – a new, temporary home until, God willing, they can return to their real home.

Dreaming of home for Syrian refugees

Today begins the last week of #Dreamshare with a post from blogger Rachel Held Evans! Share your dreams at our Share My Dream website, use the hashtag #dreamshare on Twitter and Instagram, and if you're a blogger, add your own posts about Syria and sharing dreams with our link-up!

Rachel writes about the importance of home, and how -- while the Syrian refugees are forced away from theirs -- we can help make this separation more bearable.

Preventing a lost generation

As the Syria crisis response communications manager for World Vision International, Meg Sattler has been reporting from Jordan about the Syrian refugee crisis.

Today, Meg tells the story of Yeman and Shamaa. As Syrian refugees living in Jordan, these best friends and next-door neighbors are getting a second chance at an education through World Vision's remedial program.

A letter to Muna, for our birthday

Meg Sattler, Syria crisis response communications manager for World Vision International, has been reporting from Jordan about the Syrian refugee crisis.

Today, Meg writes a heart-breaking letter to Muna, a Syrian child who shares her same birthday, exploring all the things she doesn't know how to explain to this innocent little girl.

A month among refugees: Coming home from Lebanon

World Vision Australia's social media manager, Joy Toose, spent a month reporting from Lebanon about the Syrian refugees who have sought shelter there from the violence at home. She wrote several amazing blogs for us from Lebanon, but I was curious to get her thoughts on the experience as a whole now that she's back home. 

I wasn't disappointed. Check this out.

Syrian refugee crisis: The true value of water

What do you know about water?

Before I went to Lebanon, I knew that it is life-saving and that clean water is key to preventing diseases. But I never realized how much its value extends beyond that. I never understood the dignity and comfort that it can offer people in hard times -- until this past month.

Syrian refugee crisis: Three things you should know

Joy Toose, social media manager for World Vision Australia, spent a month reporting from Lebanon about the Syrian refugees who fled there to escape violence in their home country. Today, she shares three things that she learned about the refugee crisis that you should know, too.

Crisis in Syria, part 3: Video and FAQs

The civil war in Syria has entered its third year, and the number of refugees fleeing the country has doubled in the past three months.

Today's post -- the third in our series about the crisis -- offers a list of the most frequently asked questions to offer our readers some background to the growing humanitarian needs.

Crisis in Syria, part 2: Refugees in Jordan

Last week, we launched a weekly series about the two-year conflict in Syria. Check out the first post by Andrea Peer if you missed it. Every Wednesday for the next several weeks, we’ll have a new story or perspective on the crisis.

In today's post by World Vision's Michael Bailey: A father struggles to find work and enough food to feed his family. A mother longs to hear from her 20-year-old son living in the war zone. Children sit and wait, idly passing hours and days, dreaming of going home to be with friends.

Crisis in Syria, part 1: Memories of summer camp

Today, we're kicking off a weekly series about the two-year conflict in Syria and the region's subsequent refugee crisis. Every Wednesday for the next several weeks, we'll have a new story or perspective on this situation, so check back!

Today's post is by Andrea Peer, World Vision communications manager, who remembers a different Syria from a visit 11 years ago -- and wonders about its future.

Syrian refugee crisis: Moved to prayer

You won't hear much in the media about the conflict in Syria -- but it's causing significant human suffering that warrants our attention and prayer.

As the crisis approaches its second anniversary, the number of Syrian refugees in Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan, Turkey, and Egypt is quickly approaching 1 million.

Here are some ways that you can pray for all the people affected as the unrest continues.

Aid worker's diary: returning to Goma

During the recent conflict in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, I was evacuated along with other World Vision colleagues to Gisenyi, Rwanda, a town a little more than a mile across the border.

We were later allowed to return to Goma to help civilians who had been displaced. Rebels of the March 23 (M23) movement were in charge of the city, and thousands of people had lost their homes and sense of stability.

A burden that children should never have to bear

An 8-year-old Syrian refugee child named Layla* shares, “I saw my cousin dying in front of me, so I always see this scene in front of my eyes.”

As children all over North America happily rummage through the cheerful remains of Christmas Day’s joys -- festive gift wrap strewn about, the latest version of Halo blaring from 40-inch television screens -- the existence of Syrian children presently seeking refuge in Lebanon is one far less carefree.

In this season of joy, it’s difficult to fathom that at least 66,000 children like Layla are coping with the loss of home and childhood as their families struggle to survive the displacement of war and onset of a cold, snowy winter in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley.

In South Sudan, a connection between conflict and hunger

With more food on the planet than ever before, it's difficult to believe that people still go hungry every day. You might assume that natural disasters, drought, or a lack of access to necessary farming equipment are to blame for a lack of food. What may surprise you, though, is that conflict is a leading cause of hunger.

Currently, conflict between Sudan and South Sudan is causing food shortages affecting millions, leaving children most vulnerable. While it is easy to see the role that a natural disaster or drought plays in hunger, the connection between conflict and hunger can be complicated. To make this complex issue easier to understand, World Vision's James Addis outlines some key questions below.

Building the best shelter for the displaced

Late last week -- after months of hard work, design, and planning -- students from three different schools gathered at John Brown University to present their solutions to the growing need for shelter of displaced people worldwide.

World Vision has been on the front lines, responding to the challenge of providing contextually appropriate shelter that offers privacy, security, and refuge from the elements -- all while being resistant to future disasters, like flooding and earthquakes.

As a part of the World Vision team that responds to emergency situations, I have firsthand knowledge of the importance of temporary shelters and was called upon to judge the student's designs.