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Tag Archives: refugees

Syrian children: “The future depends on us”

Syrian children: “The future depends on us” | World Vision Blog

16-year-old Syrian refugee Ammar has lived in a refugee camp in Jordan for almost 3 years, and hasn't been able to attend school. (Photo: 2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Growing up in conflict, displaced, and as refugees, the children of Syria have become a vulnerable generation—at risk of being lost altogether—without access to the things they need to be successful in life.

The future doesn't belong only to the children who grow up in peace.

It belongs to every child.

The faces that stay with you

The faces that stay with you | World Vision Blog

Syrian refugee Ghaziyye with her one of her 4-year-old twin daughters in Lebanon. (Photo: 2013 Lauren Fisher/World Vision)

13-year-old Oujelan. Ghaziyye and her twin girls. 4-year-old Saad, who's forgotten how to play—these are some of the faces that have stayed with today's writer, Lauren Fisher, who visited Lebanon a year ago.

Today, Lauren reflects on the people she met and celebrates the ways that World Vision's work with the Syrian refugees has helped them and many more, and continues.

Syria: Refugees in winter

Syria: Refugees in winter | World Vision Blog

Photo: 2015 Ralph Baydoun/World Vision

World Vision’s Sevil Omer recently traveled to the Middle East, serving with our Syria crisis response, based in Amman, Jordan. She shares insights and the latest from our work providing winter relief to the most vulnerable affected by Syria’s conflict: Children.

Join us as we partner with One Day's Wages to double your ability to help children and families displaced by conflict in Syria and Iraq! For every dollar you give to One Day's Wages' World Vision campaign, they will match, up to $50,000.

Syrian refugees: Four years in crisis

Syrian refugees: Four years in crisis | World Vision Blog

Children displaced from their homes by conflict are living in makeshift, inadequate shelter during this cold winter. (Photo: 2014 Mary Kate MacIsaac/World Vision)

This week, we're partnering with One Day's Wages to double your ability to help children and families displaced by conflict in Syria and Iraq! For every dollar you give to One Day's Wages' World Vision campaign, they will match, up to $50,000.

Today, read where the past four years of crisis have taken the people of Syria and World Vision's journey to assist them, then give and watch it be doubled!

Q&A: Winter in Iraq

Q&A: Winter in Iraq | World Vision Blog

Photo: Iraqi children Oulah, 5, and Zareh, 7, play cat's cradle with a piece of twine. While children often claim that their greatest needs are toys, their parents' priority is preparing for the fast-approaching winter in which temperatures will drop below freezing, and many are protected only by tarpaulins. (©2014 Mark Kate MacIsaac/World Vision)

 

Chris Palusky, a vice president here at World Vision, recently traveled to Iraqi Kurdistan to meet displaced families, aid workers, government officials, and church leaders.

Today, Chris answers a few questions about his visit and provides an update on the needs of families far from home, and World Vision’s response to this crisis in northern Iraq.

Why we’re going into Iraq

Why we’re going into Iraq | World Vision Blog

A little girl displaced by conflict in Iraq. (Photo: ©2014 Meg Sattler/World Vision)

1.8 million children, mothers, and fathers have been internally displaced because of the conflict in Iraq. World Vision has recently begun relief operations to help them.

"We are going into Iraq," writes Rich Stearns, president of World Vision U. S. "Difficult, challenging, and risky as it might be."

Why? Read more to find out.

Children suffer most in South Sudan

Children suffer most in South Sudan | World Vision Blog

As conflict ravages South Sudan, the nation’s children are bearing the brunt of the crisis: separated from their families, hungry and malnourished, not in school, and at risk of abuse and exploitation.

Michael Arunga, World Vision emergency communications advisor for Africa, looks back at the brief history of South Sudan and reflects on how this new nation came to its current situation.

World Vision brings children together

World Vision brings children together | World Vision Blog

Syrian refugee children attend World Vision classes in Jordan. (Photo: 2013: Jon Warren/World Vision)

For World Refugee Day today, we're highlighting our Child-Friendly Spaces, which are helping Syrian refugee children play and smile again after the trauma they've been through.

Read about a small building tucked into a back street in downtown Irbid, Jordan, where World Vision is helping to bridge the gap between Syrian refugee children and vulnerable kids in Jordan.

Azraq: A new home for Syrian refugees

Azraq: A new home for Syrian refugees | World Vision Blog

Azraq refugee camp in Jordan, where up to 100,000 Syrian refugees will begin living this week. (Photo: 2014 Robert Neufeld/World Vision)

World Vision has been a key player in developing the Azraq Refugee Camp in Jordan, which later this week will begin housing up to 100,000 Syrian refugees. Clean water, sanitation facilities, schools, playgrounds, a supermarket and a hospital – a new, temporary home until, God willing, they can return to their real home.

Dreaming of home for Syrian refugees

Today begins the last week of #Dreamshare with a post from blogger Rachel Held Evans! Share your dreams at our Share My Dream website, use the hashtag #dreamshare on Twitter and Instagram, and if you're a blogger, add your own posts about Syria and sharing dreams with our link-up!

Rachel writes about the importance of home, and how -- while the Syrian refugees are forced away from theirs -- we can help make this separation more bearable.

A month among refugees: Coming home from Lebanon

World Vision Australia's social media manager, Joy Toose, spent a month reporting from Lebanon about the Syrian refugees who have sought shelter there from the violence at home. She wrote several amazing blogs for us from Lebanon, but I was curious to get her thoughts on the experience as a whole now that she's back home. 

I wasn't disappointed. Check this out.