Tag Archives: proper hygiene

Clean water for everyone in more than 2000 villages

Clean water for everyone in more than 2000 villages | World Vision Blog

A village in Zambia celebrates receiving access to clean water! (Photo: Dr. Greg Allgood/World Vision)

This month, World Vision Water announced a major accomplishment and something of a miracle: this year, we’ve provided clean drinking water to every man, woman, and child in 2,416 villages in Africa!

Read about our ambitious plan for universal coverage with clean water!

Going Deep: Global Water Solutions

Going Deep: Global Water Solutions | World Vision Blog

Eugene Cho visiting water projects in Kenya. (Photo: One Day's Wages/World Concern)

Pastor, speaker, and author Eugene Cho's parents grew up in extreme poverty in Korea. In this video interview, he describes the "not with hand-outs but with hand-ups" approach that gave them respect and dignity.

World Vision approaches community development in this way, working toward significant and lasting change in communities around the world. In an excerpt from Eugene's new book Overrated, he describes how these solutions work best for clean water, sanitation, and hygiene.

Getting real about sanitation: the dirty secret

Getting real about sanitation: the dirty secret | World Vision Blog

Hand washing is an important part of World Vision's sanitation education programs. (Photo: 2014 Dr. Greg Allgood/World Vision)

When World Vision provides a community with clean water, the impact of that water reaches much farther than the water the people drink. Latrines (sanitation) and proper hygiene (hand washing) are also crucial components of our holistic approach to community development.

Read about Dr. Greg Allgood's recent visit to Zambia, where hygiene and sanitation are transforming the health and well-being of communities!

Bath time brings tears

Bath time brings tears | World Vision Blog

Lauren Fisher with Syrian refugee Ghaziyye and her 4-year-old twin girls. (Photo: ©2013 Ralph Baydoun/World Vision)

Lauren Fisher, World Vision emergency communications officer, writes about meeting Ghaziyye and her twin girls, age 4, who are living as refugees in Lebanon.

What brought this mother to tears wasn't the violence or fear or having lost everything; it was that her girls were always dirty. Read how a simple provision from World Vision has wiped away those tears.

[Q&A] Water for the World Act

In today's Q&A, Lisa Bos -- World Vision's policy adviser for health, education, and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) in Washington, D.C. -- describes the Water for the World Act and explains why this new legislation is vital for providing clean water where it's most needed. Lisa is an expert when it comes to this bill -- she helped write it!

President Clinton’s toast to clean water

Twelve-year-old Confiance looked up at former President Bill Clinton, who rested his hand on her shoulder. I doubt she really knew who this man was, but she knew that it was a big deal he was visiting this Rwandan school.

And here she was, one of two children chosen to help demonstrate how a life-saving water purification system works.

Q&A: "WASH" programs, past, present, & future

In today's Q&A, Randy Strash, World Vision's senior manager of water, sanitation, and hygiene programs (WASH), delves into the effectiveness of our work to bring clean water and improved sanitation and hygiene to the communities we serve.

Why World Vision? Water, sanitation, and hygiene

Providing access to clean water, combined with sanitation facilities and hygiene training, is foundational to World Vision's holistic approach to community development. All week, we look forward to sharing with you the impact that our work in water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) has already made, as well as the future of this critical work.

WORLD WATER DAY!

Today is World Water Day. Help World Vision and our partners bring sustainable access to clean water -- and the health, economic, and educational benefits it provides -- to the world.

Here's what we're doing:

Handwashing: The greatest medical invention of all time

Today, believe it or not, is Global Handwashing Day.

I appreciate there are a ton of these kinds of days, and it’s sometimes tough to get excited about them all. So far this month we’ve had World Habitat Day, International Day of Older Persons, International Day of Non-Violence, World Teachers Day, World Post Day, World Mental Health Day, International Day of the Girl Child, World Sight Day, International Day for Disaster Reduction, and International Day of Rural Women.

Phew! What a list -- and we're only halfway through the month. One would have to be a saint to get passionate about them all.

On the other hand, commemorative days can focus attention on what might easily be a vital yet neglected topic. Handwashing happens to be one such issue.

Shining example: The shoeshine stand that delivers clean water

Leon McLaughlin’s story might make a script for a feel-good kids’ movie.

The plot goes like this: A humble shoeshine man operates from a stand in an important city building. As he shines the shoes of top city officials and business people, he shares his passion for bringing clean water to children around the world.

Clean water is life: Improvements to wells in Zambia

Samuel Mwinda Mwanangombe is World Vision’s design, monitoring, and evaluation officer for the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) program in Zambia. Samuel has worked for World Vision for three years, motivated by the opportunity to improve the quality of life for vulnerable and marginalized people -- especially orphans, widows, and those with disabilities -- by helping them realize their own potential to be agents of change.

He is dedicated to WASH because he’s seen firsthand the changes it has produced in communities and the lives of children. Samuel has seen God work through the WASH sector in Zambia, providing those in need with clean water, improved sanitation, and hygiene education to sustain their lives. Here, Samuel shares an example of that success, which he witnessed in a community where he works.

Q&A with our clean water expert in Uganda

Leading up to World Water Day on March 22, we're going to do a series of posts about our work in the area of water and sanitation, giving you some ideas of how to get involved.

Back in November, I got to see some of our clean water programs in northern Uganda, a place that is still scarred by decades of brutal civil war with Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA). I never knew how complex the solution to the problem of clean water could be -- but I got to learn from some experts and ask a lot of questions.

One of the most informative conversations I had was with John Steifel, World Vision's Uganda water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) program coordinator. His explanations were so good, I thought I'd share them with you.

Why we start with water and sanitation

Recently I was invited on a trip with World Vision donors to visit our clean water programs in Uganda. I'm really proud that World Vision's water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) programming is among the most advanced in the sector and helps thousands of children and families in communities affected by drought, natural disasters, and poor living conditions around the world.

While in Uganda, I talked with John Steifel, World Vision's Uganda WASH program coordinator.  I sat down with him for an informal interview so he could explain to me why we start with water in a community, and why clean water by itself isn't enough. He gave such a clear explanation of why sanitation and hygiene programs have to go hand in hand with bringing clean water. Here are the highlights:

An ode to the toilet (PHOTO BLOG)

How many times have you used the toilet today? Judging by the fact that you are awake enough to be reading this blog, I’m assuming the answer is at least once, and probably more. (Maybe you are even reading this while on the toilet, which means you probably have the luxury of using a loo that is clean, private, and relatively comfortable).

For all of you who are fortunate enough to have a toilet in your life, I would like to wish you a happy World Toilet Day.

No, I’m not kidding -- Saturday is World Toilet Day. You mean you didn’t get the memo?

Granted, for those of us who are lucky enough to have an abundance of bathrooms in which to “do our business,” it might seem a bit silly to celebrate the toilet. Aren’t there bigger development problems to tackle? Bigger accomplishments to celebrate?

But I want you to think back to the last time you didn’t have a decent toilet when you needed one (maybe your last camping trip, that port-a-potty at the stadium, or that long stretch of road between rest stops). Toilets, or lack thereof, are no laughing matter. Are they?