Tag Archives: nutrition

A five-star gift that changes lives and gives hope

A five-star gift that changes lives and gives hope | World Vision Blog

6-year-old Arminda in Bolivia, whose family's fortunes were dramatically changed by the gift of pigs from World Vision's Gift Catalog. (Photo: ©2011 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Give the Gift of a Pig - One Pig $205 or a Share of a Pig $25!

Give the gift of a pig today to boost family incomes and provide plenty of protein for undernourished children. One sow can produce 20 babies a year, and within six months a piglet can weigh 200 pounds — and fetch a hefty price at the market.

See why pigs are this family's favorite gift!

A strategy for nutrition

A strategy for nutrition | World Vision Blog

At 18 months, Rita in Nepal was malnourished, but today she is getting the nutrition she needs and is healthy! (Photo: 2012 Alina Shrestha/World Vision)

There is no one solution to malnutrition. But the new five-year U.S. Government nutrition strategy and World Vision's development model are designed to address all of its causes.

Read how this new strategy is designed to reduce stunting and save lives!

A contest to end malnutrition

A contest to end malnutrition | World Vision Blog

Women and children of Badnapur and Solamoh villages, who participated in the Nutrition Exhibition 2012, aiming to combat malnutrition with creative recipes and education. (Photo: 2012 Annila Harris/World Vision)

The Melghat region of India is known for its high rates of child malnutrition. In response to this challenge, World Vision India devised an innovative technique for change, not only targeting attitude and behavior, but also aiming to address the source of the problem, with … a cooking contest!

Transforming child health through better nutrition

Join us in celebrating World Food Day today!

Tran Thi Mui, a young mother in rural Vietnam, was sad to learn that her first child, Vu Viet Ha, was malnourished. Child malnutrition can lead to reduced mental and physical development as children grow. Aware of this danger, Mui was determined to change her daughter’s situation by continuing to participate in her nutrition club supported by World Vision.

Proper nutrition for Mongolian babies

Today through August 7 is World Breastfeeding Week! Coordinated by UNICEF, the World Health Organization, and a variety of other partners, this year's theme highlights peer counseling programs for mothers.

Through World Vision, mothers and infants in Mongolia are benefiting from such initiatives. Find out how!

Why World Vision? Providing the key to food security

Week 1 of our Why World Vision? campaign explored our holistic approach to community development, and for the past two weeks we've looked at how both WASH (Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene) and Health programs strengthen communities.

This week, we delve into our work with Food & Agriculture — a variety of programs designed to increase food security and provide better nutrition for children, families, and communities.

HungerFree: Your guide to the G8 and G20 summits

HungerFree is a campaign to end global hunger by creatively engaging world leaders on the topic. In May and June, leaders from the world's largest economies will meet for the G8 and G20 summits to discuss issues of global significance. James Pedrick of World Vision ACT:S, our college activism network, discusses these summits and the important role they can play in eliminating world hunger.

Uganda: Visible progress for children

Uganda is one of 16 poor countries that are considered "trailblazers" for the progress they’ve made toward eliminating poverty and improving health. The nation is on track to meet at least half of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals by 2015.

Progress is hard-won, but encouraging. Here are some accomplishments to celebrate.

Hunger in West Africa: Putting you in their shoes

You are in a small health clinic in southern Chad. It is 9 a.m. The air is hot, dry, and filled with cries.

You are amidst 40 mothers sitting on the ground or on the clinic’s porch, babies in their laps. Under brightly colored headscarves, their faces look tired, drawn, sad. You catch glimpses of the babies. Their skin is stretched over their chests like paper over wire frames. Their legs are long and thin. Their bellies are protruding. Four of the mothers, clearly malnourished themselves but still trying to breastfeed their babies, are sitting on a wooden bench. In front of them is a row of tall, yellow roses.

You have never seen so much color and sadness in the same place. The contrast is unbearable. But you try to cope.

Then, your name is called out. You look up. But it’s not you who is being called. It is one of the mothers. She struggles to get onto her feet. She walks with her baby into the consultation room. Tears flow down the baby’s face as he is measured, weighed, and the nutrition-monitoring band is wrapped around his arm. You don’t need to wait to hear the results to know that he is severely malnourished.

Food for thought: Giving children the best start in the first 1,000 days

You’ve got to respect the tenacity of a babe in arms to hold up his head, focus his eyes, and grasp a grownup’s finger. An enormous amount of mental heavy lifting is going on behind those eyes, and a lot of high-quality fuel is needed to build the muscle and brain cells at work.

Mom’s milk is the perfect fuel, and it’s all that’s needed for the first six months of life. But a new report from World Vision called “The Best Start” makes clear that other simple and inexpensive measures can help ensure that millions more children get a healthy start toward a full life.

Why? Because:

  • Undernourishment is a child’s worst enemy. Around 2.5  million children die each year from a variety of ailments that can be traced back to one problem: not enough of the right nutrients.
  • The first 1,000 days -- from conception to age 2 -- are critical. A child who misses out on the proper nutrients during this time will not achieve his or her mental or physical potential.

World Food Day in a time of famine (Blog Action Day)

World Vision New Zealand's nutrition specialist Briony Stevens has just returned from East Africa. She blogs about her experience as part of today's Blog Action Day, dedicated this year to discussion on the topic of food given that today is also World Food Day.

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World Food Day seems such a bizarre concept when you’re standing in an over-crowded refugee camp in East Africa where there is a distinct lack of anything edible. When you’re measuring the circumference of a child’s upper arm as a means of determining how malnourished they are. When you watch a mother continue to clutch her baby to her, long after he or she has passed away.

Food is an answer, but what's the solution?

What if there was one nutrient that would take away feelings of constant fatigue, keep hearts beating regularly, and help kids to get better grades in school and reach their potential? What if this “magical” nutrient would prevent dizziness, provide strength and energy, protect against other diseases, keep mothers from dying during delivery, and keep babies alive past their fifth birthday?

If you had access to that food, would you buy it for yourself? If you had it, would you give it away -- even to someone halfway across the globe?

In the world of global nutrition, that nutrient does exist. It is called iron. Iron is all over the place in America -- beef, pork, chicken, seafood, beans, breads, cereal, and dark leafy greens. With all of these food sources, it seems like it would be so simple to get enough iron.