The miracle at Mosul

The miracle at Mosul | World Vision Blog

The Wedding Feast at Cana, Paolo Veronese, The Louvre.

As the world celebrates International Artist Day today, join us in honoring Ibrahim—a painter from Mosul, Iraq who was displaced from his home two years ago.

His powerful work captures the heart and soul of a Christian artist whose home has been destroyed by a war that is intensifying today.

See Iraq through his eyes.

Recipe from Mosul, Iraq: Making Dolma away from home

Recipe from Mosul, Iraq: Making Dolma away from home | World Vision Blog

Not only does emergency food aid help keep people alive and nourished in times of crisis, it can also give them a sense of normalcy during times of trauma and change.

See how innovative projects through the World Food Program are empowering people like Saeeda—who was displaced from Mosul, Iraq two years ago—to cook her favorite recipes from home.

And try making Dolma yourself!

Recipe: Buuz—traditional Mongolian dumplings

Recipe: Buuz—traditional Mongolian dumplings | World Vision Blog

Sponsored girl Anudari making buuz, traditional Mongolian dumplings. (Photo: ©2009 Enkhbayar Purevjav/World Vision)

On the plains of Mongolia, the cuisine is focused on meat and dairy, especially for nomadic herding families.

See what it's like to cook in this harsh climate, and try a recipe at home … "buuz," traditional Mongolian steamed dumplings!

Cooking for better nutrition in Nicaragua

Cooking for better nutrition in Nicaragua | World Vision Blog

5-year-old Nicole in Nicaragua was underweight for her age, but therapeutic food and cooking for better nutrition have her healthy and active again! (Photo: ©2015 Eugene Lee/World Vision)

When it comes to children’s nutrition, food quality is more important than quantity. Without the right foods, malnutrition can still limit a child’s development and weaken the immune system.

See how new recipes and cooking techniques are helping to keep children healthy in Nicaragua!

Pancakes and prayer

Pancakes and prayer | World Vision Blog

Josephine Bingi cooks banana pancakes on a Sunday morning in Uganda to sell at church. (Photo: 2016 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Josephine in Uganda makes 650 banana pancakes every Sunday and sells them at church for a penny each. She raises her 13 children and grandchildren on that income: $6.50 a week.

See what it's like to make this recipe, and how love and prayer keep her going. 

A partnership to reach millions with sustainable clean water

A partnership to reach millions with sustainable clean water | World Vision Blog

This clean water tap in Zambia supports local business! It's next to a milk co-op receiving center, which needs water for cleaning containers. (Photo: 2015 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Our goal is to provide sustainable clean water and sanitation to every person in every place where we work. To achieve this goal, we have to make our methods even better!

See the specific ways in which we’ve partnered with a research institute to do this, and meet the people whose futures are already changing for the better.

Photos: Engaging communities to combat Zika

Photos: Engaging communities to combat Zika | World Vision Blog

In Honduras, Aida brings 8-month-old Crisia to the health center to be tested for Zika. (Photo: 2016 Israel Cárcamo/World Vision)

There have been more than half a million cases of the Zika virus so far across 47 countries.

Focusing on the five most affected countries, which are in Latin America, we're working to empower communities to combat the virus by learning new behaviors that help prevent and treat the disease.

Our photo series shows how!

Defending her life

Defending her life | World Vision Blog

Hector Rodriguez Garcia and his 16-year-old daughter Janeth grow coffee in Honduras. (Photo: Laura Reinhardt/World Vision)

This is the story of two fathers in Honduras: Jose Gustavo, a farmer who is motivated by his faith and the loss of his daughter Maria Paula, and Hector, whose 16-year-old daughter Janeth helps him grow coffee.

Read how overcoming poverty through sponsorship and economic development helps to defend childhood and enables children to experience full lives right where God planted them.

Adventures for a compassionate world

Adventures for a compassionate world | World Vision Blog

Two refugee children together on board World Vision's "Operation Seasweep" rescue ship in 1979. (Photo: Jon Kubly/World Vision)

Children spend 7 hours a day on screens, but what if screen time can be a positive thing?

Blogger Haley Bodine writes about how she cultivated compassion with her son and helped shape his character with Focus on the Family’s Adventures in Odyssey.

Read about their Odyssey Adventure Club and start your 14-day free trial!

Equipping women for business to reduce early marriage in Bangladesh

Equipping women for business to reduce early marriage in Bangladesh | World Vision Blog

Jachinta vaccinates chicken and ducks for her community in Bangladesh. (Photo: World Vision)

In Bangladesh, we're helping women like Jachinta learn new business skills. When families earn better incomes, they can better provide for their children.

And in a country like Bangladesh where half of girls are married by 15, these parents don't feel they need to marry their daughters off so young.

Read more about our "Fresh Start" program!

Waging peace in a time of war

Waging peace in a time of war | World Vision Blog

The global refugee crisis is an opportunity to demonstrate what we as Christians stand for: compassion, not fear; people, not politics; and concern for others. It’s our chance to show that we don’t see refugees as unloved. We try to see them as God does: as made in His image, full of potential, and beloved.

This International Day of Peace, join our president Rich Stearns in reaching out to refugees with love.


The wisdom of compassion

The wisdom of compassion | World Vision Blog

Photo: 2013 Paul Bettings/World Vision

Living a life of compassion and justice is obedient to how God wants us to live as Christians. God says that it is advantageous to our own souls to choose to care about the poorest people in the world.

Blogger Haley Bodine explains how the book of Proverbs—a book about living wisely—tell us it is not only good of us to love the poor … it is also good for us.

A unique partnership that uses green energy to provide water

A unique partnership that uses green energy to provide water | World Vision Blog

Jeneta Sneele, a 59-year-old grandmother, waters her garden with water from a World Vision solar-powered mechanized borehole in Zambia. (Photo: 2015 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Jeneta is 59 and used to carry 40 pounds of water on her head, uphill, with her granddaughter on her back. But not anymore.

Today, her village in Zambia has clean water brought right to them … and it's all solar powered!

Gender equity makes all the difference

Gender equity makes all the difference | World Vision Blog

Thembeni with her baby girl in Zimbabwe. She participated in infant nutrition trainings through World Vision. (Photo: 2012 Leonard Makombe/World Vision)

When women participate in our food security programs, what’s the most significant impact in their lives? You might expect them to talk about the money they saved or the health and nutrition of their children, but they don’t.

For women like Memory Mushanga in Zimbabwe, this program saved her marriage. See how!

His sister’s keeper: Protecting kids from child sacrifice

His sister’s keeper: Protecting kids from child sacrifice | World Vision Blog

Family friends smooth over the concrete of 6-year-old Trevor's grave after his body was found yesterday. (Photo: Jon Warren/World Vision)

Yesterday, 6-year-old Trevor’s body was found in Uganda. He had been sacrificed by a witchdoctor. Our staff writer Kari is there in Uganda right now.

Pray with us for Trevor’s mother, and see how our Amber Alert program is working to bring children home when they’re abducted:

The crazy love of humanitarian aid workers

The crazy love of humanitarian aid workers | World Vision Blog

World Vision staffer in South Sudan, Michael Angkok with four children he helped unite with relatives after their parents were killed. (Photo: 2015 Jon Warren/World Vision)

What earns humanitarian aid workers the right to speak into the lives of others? Simple: love! Crazy love.

This #WorldHumanitarianDay, hear from our president Richard Stearns about how the example of our staff provokes the question that only the gospel can answer.