Tag Archives: Dominican Republic

Are you the protagonist of your life story?

Are you the protagonist of your life story? | World Vision Blog

Blogger Elayna Fernandez visits World Vision youth programs in the Dominican Republic. (Photo: Eugene Lee/World Vision)

Are you the protagonist in your own life story … with God as the Author?

Join blogger Elayna Fernandez—The Positive Momas she meets youth in the Dominican Republic who are becoming leaders in God's story and inspiring others to embrace their own identity. 

Beautiful giving | Bella bondad

Beautiful giving | Bella bondad | World Vision Blog

Blogger Daily Baez visits our work with children in the Dominican Republic. (Photo: Eugene Lee/World Vision)

Blogger Daily Baez was born in the Dominican Republic, and remembering her childhood, writes: "World Vision has given me hope."

Two weeks ago, Daily returned to her homeland with our bloggers to visit that hope in person. Today, see the DR through Daily's eyes.

Leerlo en español también!

A mother’s story: Being positive about HIV

A mother’s story: Being positive about HIV | World Vision Blog

Blogger Elayna Fernandez with 11-year-old Kalina in the Dominican Republic. (Photo: Eugene Lee/World Vision)

Happy Mother's Day!

Last week, Elayna Fernandez—The Positive Mom—joined our World Vision Bloggers in the Dominican Republic, where we met an amazing mother: Milagros, or "miracles."

Meet this miracle mom with us and see her journey from hardship to being positive about having HIV.

8 stories that fed my soul in the Dominican Republic

8 stories that fed my soul in the Dominican Republic | World Vision Blog

Food blogger Melissa Bailey visits children in the DR. (Photo: Eugene Lee/World Vision)

Food blogger Melissa Bailey (Hungry Food Love) grew up in the Dominican Republic, and returned to her homeland last week with the World Vision Bloggers!

Take a tour of eight stories she experienced that nourished her soul, and the top five things she learned about World Vision.

Unique solutions to unique poverties

Unique solutions to unique poverties | World Vision Blog

Blogger Ben Corey shows photos on his phone to children in Dr. Jacobo's batay. (Photo: Eugene Lee/World Vision)

A new post live from the Dominican Republic! Every unique version of poverty requires it's own custom solution. See how the programs we're visiting in the DR are doing just that!

And meet a young doctor who's demonstrating that communities can be stronger when they work together.

In the Dominican Republic, good news on poverty

In the Dominican Republic, good news on poverty | World Vision Blog

World Vision U.S. president Rich Stearns visits children in the Dominican Republic. (Photo: 2015 Lindsey Minerva/World Vision)

Despite continued heartbreak in the most difficult places in the world, over the past few decades there has been incredible progress in the fight against extreme poverty.

On a recent trip to the Dominican Republic, our president Rich Stearns and the CEO of Family Christian Stores, Chuck Bengochea, witnessed "the opposite of the usual story of global poverty." See what this transformation from hardship—and a new, brighter future—looks like!

Who's that girl?

"Who’s that girl?" I wondered while watching Carter’s Chord, a sister band who recently traveled to the Dominican Republic to create a video of their song, "Love a Little Bigger."

I love the song and its message: how blessed we are and how a luxury, like drinking a $4 cup of coffee, can make us feel guilty, especially when we are confronted by pictures of the poor.

Being from Seattle, the coffee center of the universe, I can relate.

The video is beautiful. The Carter’s Chord sisters are lovely. Their voices are wonderful. The Dominican Republic is an astonishing country, dripping with tropical delight.

But the prettiest thing in the video is its little star -- a girl whose life they captured from her early-morning routine, waking up and rubbing the sleep from her eyes, through the moment where she seemed to take flight -- dancing with the Carter’s Chord sisters as they sang.