Tag Archives: Community development

The therapeutic power of tea

Life in the Indian village of Mawlyngot used to revolve around the brewery, which led many toward alcoholism. Now, through a World Vision initiative, the villagers plant and harvest tea instead -- bringing about a therapeutic transformation for everyone.

[Video] How World Vision works: Bringing hope

Poverty is not simply a lack of material provision. It's also an emotional and psychological state caused by a lack of resources.

Today, we have a great little video that illustrates World Vision's approach to fighting poverty: developing communities and bringing them hope.

[Photos] A beginning and an end

Today, two photographers bring you snapshots from two different communities: the first in Burundi as it prepares to begin a World Vision development program, and the second in Sri Lanka as it completes its program and celebrates the work that has been accomplished.

Why World Vision? Communities Matter

World Vision believes that working at the community level is the best solution for sustainable development. All week, we look forward to sharing with you our holistic model and the effectiveness of coming alongside a community working to become free from poverty.

Be sure to check back throughout the week to see a beautiful photo blog, a video, and a Q&A with our community development expert!

Why World Vision? From "spare change" to lasting change

Ever wonder how your donations to World Vision make a difference?

Over the next few months, we're excited to share with you the vision of our ministry, exploring two areas -- how we work, and what difference it makes for those whom we serve.

Expect infographics, stories from the field, and Q&As with development experts each week as we highlight how our community development helps create freedom from poverty through a variety of interventions -- such as clean water, food, education, and economic development.

[Photos] Building a better world for children

How do we build a better world for children? The first step is to understand the issues impacting their lives; then, to have hope that situations can improve; then, to provide opportunities to bring about that change.

Confidence through contortion

Contortion -- the art of flexing and bending your body into jaw-dropping positions -- is a highly-respected, centuries-old tradition in Mongolia. As part of its development program in the area, World Vision supports a contortion class to help children have fun and develop social skills.

Biker mom makes the dough

Poverty affects almost every element of a family’s life. It often robs children of their childhoods and can hinder strong, sustainable communities from being built.

But as shown by the story of Sam Mai and her family in Cambodia, a microloan can provide hope for something more -- an independent, self-sufficient future.

Here he comes, the violinist!

Looking at the photo of 5-year-old Abner and his violin, you might think, “How cute!”

But don’t let his gap-toothed smile fool you. Abner is what you might call a child prodigy.

Before he could read or write, Abner could play the violin. He picked it up when he was 3, and from that day on, practicing for an hour a day wasn’t a chore -- it was a joy.

PHOTOS: A new chapter for Amri Karbi, India

After 15 fruitful years, World Vision's work is coming to a close in the Amri Karbi region of India's Assam state.

Some 2,300 children have been sponsored in the area, and significant improvements have been made in education, economic development, infrastructure, and healthcare. World Vision sponsorship funds have bought books and furniture for classrooms, while helping parents pay for their children's school fees and uniforms. Women have been provided with training in entrepreneurship, as well as funds for start-up business efforts. A new chapter is beginning for the Amri Karbi region as the cycle of poverty is broken.

World Vision photographer Jon Warren gives us a glimpse of life there through the images below. Read the full story in World Vision magazine.

A story of two Sams

Heather Althoff's family sponsors a Ugandan boy named Sam. Below, Heather shares her story of meeting Sam and his family. Wondering how sponsoring a child can bless your life and perspective just as profoundly as it does the life of the child you help? Here's a story for you.

Dirty water for now -- but clean water is in the works

Water: It’s such a simple thing, but if you don’t have enough, it takes over your life.

That’s what 13-year-old Zinhle Dlamini told me. Getting water for her family in rural Swaziland is a two-hour-per-day chore. And the dirty water they get is not nearly enough for all the drinking, cooking, cleaning, and bathing for a household of 10 people.

PHOTO BLOG: Child sponsorship reaches parents, too

Children, children, children. Everything we do at World Vision is for children. But when I visited a sponsorship area in northeast India earlier this month, program staff first wanted to show me the work they were doing with parents. They believed the most effective way to make a difference in the lives of children was to care about the whole family, improve parents’ livelihoods, and involve the entire community in long-term problem-solving.

As a parent myself, this made complete sense. My life centers around my kids. Make my earning more secure, and I’m better able to care for my family. Improve community structure, and everyone benefits. So I was first shown fish ponds and weaving groups, rubber trees, and orange groves. Making life better for children is our top priority at World Vision. Often that means focusing on the parents, too.

[Bolivia bloggers] Day 6: 10 things I've learned about child sponsorship

Today has been like a beath of fresh air, and not just because the weather has been ideal. We spent the day with the people of Viloma.

This ADP has been operating for thirteen  years. The Colomi ADP that I spoke of each of the last two days only began a year and a half ago. The programs that can change the lives of every member in a community in only thirteen years are inspirational.

Here are the top ten things I've learned this week about the ways child sponsorship benefits a whole community:

[Bolivia bloggers] Day 3: Trickle-Up Economics...

The terrain of Cochabamba, Bolivia is both breathtakingly beautiful and violently rugged. In the shadow of its snow-covered mountains are hundreds of arid rocky hills, where horses and cows perch as skillfully as mountain goats upon the steep slopes where people too make their homes. The high altitude (over 12,000 feet in some places!) leaves even the most skilled climbers breathless.

It takes most children over an hour to walk the winding gravel roads to school. Women who want or need to deliver their babies in a hospital typically face a three mile walk…while in labor…to the nearest health facility. The average income is just $450 a year.

Ask a humanitarian... Tough questions answered!

At the end of last week, Rachel Held Evans, one of the fabulous bloggers headed with us to Bolivia, asked her readers what tough questions they had about child sponsorship, humanitarian work, and World Vision. I dug for answers to the questions they asked with the help of colleagues across our organization.

Perhaps you or others you know have wondered what the answers are to these questions. And if you have any other questions for us, just ask!

Writing next time from Bolivia,

Carla


Here's a couple of my fave questions on Rachel's blog... (The follow is an excerpt from Rachel Held Evans' interview "Ask a humanitarian... (Carla responds)")

Question from Elizabeth: How does child sponsorship help the community at large and not just the individual children? Do the sponsored children end up using their education to just leave their poor communities behind? I have always worried about this.

World Vision’s work is always in the context of families and communities because children thrive when their families and communities are healthy. Our interventions depend on what the community needs.   Children who have access to good nutrition, clean water, basic healthcare, and educational opportunities are better prepared to build a future for themselves and their families and communities.