Tag Archives: child protection

Lured into marriage: A survivor’s story of being trafficked

Lured into marriage: A survivor’s story of being trafficked | World Vision Blog

Pyone at her new job at Eden Ministry making beads. (Photo: 2016 Khin Myo Kant/World Vision)

Today is World Day Against Trafficking in Persons.

Pyone is a survivor of human trafficking. After four years trapped in another country, today she is reunited with her family, working to support her daughter, and this past spring told her story so other young women might avoid her horrible experience.

Read her story here.

UPDATE: Protection from child sacrifice—It’s working!

UPDATE: Protection from child sacrifice—It’s working! | World Vision Blog

Sharon wears an earring to protect her from child sacrifice. Her brother Moses was sacrificed two years ago. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Two years ago we reported the story, “Protection Through Pierced Ears in Uganda,” about one of our most innovative programs—an Amber Alert designed to save children from being sacrificed in Uganda.

Project manager Obed Byamugisha risks his life every day in a battle against witch doctors. Last month we got an update on the project and his personal life. See how communities in Uganda are working together to keep their children safe.

The hidden side of humanitarian crisis: Gender-based violence

The hidden side of humanitarian crisis: Gender-based violence | World Vision Blog

Photo: Ralph Baydoun/World Vision

During humanitarian crises like armed conflict and natural disasters, violence—especially against women and girls—has been shown to increase. This culture of violence can be one of the greatest challenges for people like refugees who are affected by crisis.

In these situations, some parents marry their young daughters off early to protect them … but in reality, child marriage is just another form of this violence. Our gender expert explains:

What do we know about preventing human trafficking?

What do we know about preventing human trafficking? | World Vision Blog

In Laos, trafficking survivors release balloons that carry written messages they want to communicate to family and friends. (Photo: 2015 Nila Douanesouvanh/World Vision)

If you knew the risks of human trafficking, would you still take those risks to provide for your family?

New research suggests that people in Southeast Asia do. See these surprising results and how we can help prevent trafficking.

Let freedom ring

Let freedom ring | World Vision Blog

Monthly Girls' Club in Florida for girls ages 6 to 12, started by a local Women of Vision chapter to build self-esteem and foster spiritual growth. (Photo: 2013 Abby Stalsbroten/World Vision)

“If America is to be a great nation, let freedom ring.” –Martin Luther King Jr., "I have a dream" speech, given on this day in 1963.

Children must be free to grow up loved and not harmed. Let us dream a better world, and make it a reality!

Read how our staff and volunteers at a girls' camp are doing just that.

Dreams from Kenya

Dreams from Kenya | World Vision Blog

Debbie Macomber and her daughter Adele in Chicago with Lillian from Kenya. (Photo: Jon Warren/World Vision)

Expected to marry at 12, Lillian in Kenya ran away and found hope through World Vision.

Bestselling author Debbie Macomber met Lillian and heard her story "of amazing bravery and tenacity."

Lillian has now graduated high school! Read her inspiring story.

Q&A: Hope at home in Honduras

Q&A: Hope at home in Honduras | World Vision Blog

Hortensia with her daughter at their home in Honduras. (Photo: 2010 Abby Stalsbroten/World Vision)

Last summer, World Vision began responding to a crisis of unaccompanied children coming into the U.S. from Central American countries like Honduras.

Why are these children leaving home?

In today's Q&A, Matt Stephens—our senior advisor for child protection—answers this question and explores how World Vision is working to address the root causes of this crisis by promoting hope at home.

Nepal earthquake: Strangers wanted her little boys

Nepal earthquake: Strangers wanted her little boys | World Vision Blog

7-year-old Aaram and his family are vulnerable to a variety of dangers after losing their house in the Nepal earthquake. (Photo: Theodore Sam/World Vision)

A week after Nepal's deadly earthquake, families are still living out in the open, in tents, in the cold, afraid of aftershocks and returning to unstable, damaged homes.

A few days ago, a stranger approached Kanchi, a mother of three, and asked to adopt her two boys.

See how World Vision works to protect children from a variety of dangers after disaster strikes.

Nepal earthquake: Up close and personal

Nepal earthquake: Up close and personal | World Vision Blog

Matt Stephens in Bhaktapur, Nepal 30 minutes before Saturday's earthquake. (Photo: World Vision)

World Vision U.S. staffer Matt Stephens was in Nepal last week for a conference. On Saturday, he was standing in Durbar Square in Bhaktapur where the photo above was taken.

Half an hour later, a 7.8 earthquake struck, toppling the temple behind him. Experience this disaster and World Vision's response through his eyes.

Day 13: Leaving no stone unturned

Leaving no stone unturned | World Vision Blog

At the age of 10, Subera in India was a child laborer, crushing stones by hand into construction material. It was her mother's same life: early marriage, no education, hard labor and poverty.

Today, Subera is 14 and in school, and on her way to a better future! See what broke her cycle of poverty and is helping make her big dreams come true.

Give thanks—part 2: Black Friday

Give thanks—part 2: Black Friday | World Vision Blog

Rich Stearns prays over Reshma in Bangladesh. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

In his two-part Thanksgiving series, World Vision USA president Rich Stearns reflects on his recent trip to Bangladesh. Read Part 1 here.

On this trip, Rich met Reshma, who will be bought and sold a dozen times today, on Black Friday, as a sex worker.

Read about the two bright spots in her life, and how World Vision is working to help her.

Give thanks—part 1: My first Thanksgiving of 2014

Give thanks—part 1: My first Thanksgiving of 2014 | World Vision Blog

Rich and Reneé Stearns with Chitra in Bangladesh. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Happy Thanksgiving! What are you thankful for today? We're thankful for you!

Earlier this month, Rich and Reneé Stearns shared their first Thanksgiving meal of 2014 with Dipshikha, who teaches the children of brothel workers at a World Vision Child Friendly Space in Bangladesh.

Read about their visit.

Defenders of childhood

Defenders of childhood | World Vision Blog

Cheerful children at a World Vision Child-Friendly Space in Bangladesh. (©2013 Plaban Ganguly/World Vision)

Often, it takes a community of supporters to lift another community out of poverty. That’s why World Vision’s Child Ambassadors are so powerful: They build a community of passionate advocates who together have the power to make a difference in the world!

Read about Stu and Celeste Sherman from Connecticut, who are working to build a community of child sponsors to help change a community and defend childhood in Bangladesh.

What a simple piece of paper is worth

What a simple piece of paper is worth | World Vision Blog

Kassahun Kebede with his wife and their little child holding a birth certificate, which is uncommon in Ethiopia. (Photo: 2012 Aklilu Kassaye/World Vision)

Protecting children starts at birth, with a simple piece of paper we all take for granted—a birth certificate. But around the world, as many as 45% of all children under the age of five don't have one.

The Girls Count Act is a new bill in Congress right now that can help address this gap, and help ensure that all children count and are protected.

Good Friday: Thirsty for justice

Good Friday: Thirsty for justice | World Vision Blog

Juliet holds her son, Junior Kisule, 2, who was saved through an initiative to prevent child sacrifice in Uganda. (©2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

On Good Friday, Jesus' next to last words were: "I am thirsty."

Today, Kari Costanza writes about Obed, a young man in Uganda who is also thirsty — thirsty for justice. “If a life is saved,” he says, “there is no greater good than that.”

Read how this Ugandan superhero's initiative and tireless work within his community are helping to save children from the evil of child sacrifice.