Tag Archives: child protection

Letter: I wouldn’t have today without World Vision

Letter: I wouldn’t have today without World Vision | World Vision Blog

Srey Mom in Cambodia. (Photo: 2005 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Powerful letter to World Vision's American donors today from Srey Mom in Cambodia who, ten years ago, was a victim of trafficking, and thanks to World Vision and to you, was delivered into safety, a bright future, and a life with God.

What a simple piece of paper is worth

What a simple piece of paper is worth | World Vision Blog

Kassahun Kebede with his wife and their little child holding a birth certificate, which is uncommon in Ethiopia. (Photo: 2012 Aklilu Kassaye/World Vision)

Protecting children starts at birth, with a simple piece of paper we all take for granted—a birth certificate. But around the world, as many as 45% of all children under the age of five don't have one.

The Girls Count Act is a new bill in Congress right now that can help address this gap, and help ensure that all children count and are protected.

Good Friday: Thirsty for justice

Good Friday: Thirsty for justice | World Vision Blog

Juliet holds her son, Junior Kisule, 2, who was saved through an initiative to prevent child sacrifice in Uganda. (©2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

On Good Friday, Jesus' next to last words were: "I am thirsty."

Today, Kari Costanza writes about Obed, a young man in Uganda who is also thirsty — thirsty for justice. “If a life is saved,” he says, “there is no greater good than that.”

Read how this Ugandan superhero's initiative and tireless work within his community are helping to save children from the evil of child sacrifice.

What Disney’s Frozen teaches us about childhood

What Disney’s Frozen teaches us about childhood | World Vision Blog

Children in Romania learn how to build a snowman. (Photo: 1993 Karen Homer/World Vision)

“Do you want to build a snowman?”

What Disney’s Academy Award-winning animated musical Frozen teaches us about childhood, love, and the importance of protecting children.

Margaret in my heart

Margaret in my heart | World Vision Blog

Margaret, writer Kari Costanza's friend from Uganda. (Photo: Kari Costanza/World Vision)

Our wonderful writer Kari Costanza reflects today in memoriam of her friend Margaret from Uganda on her recent return trip to Gulu.

Read how World Vision sponsors brought joy and fresh hope to the families Kari visited, as they had to Margaret, and how memories of their friendship strengthened Kari on her trip.

Salmina escapes from early marriage

Salmina escapes from early marriage | World Vision Blog

Salmina, 16, escaped an arranged, early marriage in Mozambique and is looking forward to returning to school. (Photo: Leovigildo Pedro/World Vision)

16-year-old Salmina lives in Mozambique. Last year, at only 15, she felt that her life was at stake when she was forced to marry a 58-year-old man and leave school.

Thanks to a community member who was trained in child protection issues by World Vision, she escaped from the nightmare. Now she is looking forward to going back to school and pursuing her dream – of teaching mathematics. Read how World Vision is helping to raise awareness around this important issue.

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda | World Vision Blog

3-year-old Sharon in Uganda wears an earring – to protect her from child sacrifice. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

In certain districts of Uganda, child sacrifice is a real danger. Today, Kari Costanza writes from Uganda about 3-year-old Sharon, whose ear piercing may protect her.

Read how a World Vision-supported amber alert program is helping to recover children that have been taken.

World Poetry Day: “Childhood Lost” by Propaganda

World Poetry Day: “Childhood Lost” by Propaganda | World Vision Blog

Spoken-word artist Propaganda, featured in today's video. (Photo: Scott Erickson)

In honor of World Poetry Day today, we’re featuring our partner, spoken-word poet Propaganda, with a video of his poem “Childhood Lost.”

“Childhood is worth saving, because once it’s gone, it’s gone.”

Watch this powerful video, and learn more about Childhood Lost.

A safe harbor

A safe harbor | World Vision Blog

Delfina (red shirt) and friends under the safe harbor of a mosquito net that Delfina's family received from World Vision. (Photo: 2012 Jon Warren/World Vision)

World Vision writer Kari Costanza reflects on taking sanctuary in her church's parking lot while being stuck in a snow storm last weekend, and how World Vision and our supporters are able to provide a safe harbor for millions of children around the world.

Protecting the poor from the plague of violence

Protecting the Poor from the Plague of Violence | World Vision Blog

"I do not want any one of us to be victims of human trafficking." –Cang, Vietnam. (Photo: 2013 Nguyen Thai Minh Minh/World Vision)

Today, our friends at International Justice Mission write about the everyday violence that is plaguing the developing world … and the new book they're launching today!

Protection through education

Protection through education | World Vision Blog

Before Ankit, 6, started attending World Vision's drop-in center last year, he used to roam the streets. (Photo: 2013 Annila Harris/World Vision)

One of the best ways to protect children from dangers like trafficking, child labor, and early marriage is to educate them, keeping them in school rather than on the streets. In India, World Vision's drop-in centers are designed to do just that: opening the door to mainstream schools.

Here are the stories of two children – Naina, 7, and Ankit, 6 – who found their way into formal education through these drop-in centers.

Under the big tree

Under the big tree | World Vision Blog

A World Vision savings group meets in Tanzania. (©2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

This past Friday, our wonderful writer/photographer team (Kari Costanza and Jon Warren) was in Tanzania, where they heard an amazing story of a community standing up to protect a little girl…from a very early marriage. This is what happened!

Su Su is finding her own dream

Su Su is finding her own dream | World Vision Blog

18-year-old Su Su is learning skills as a hairdresser. Now she has hope for her dream of being a hair salon owner.

As a child, Su Su* worked a variety of jobs in Cambodia to help provide for her family, a road that led her into prostitution at the age of 14.

Through a World Vision recovery center, Su Su has learned the skills she needs to follow her dream. Now, she has real plans for her future.

This is her story in her own words.**

Roots and wings

Roots and wings | World Vision Blog

Zebra is a former child soldier who benefited from World Vision’s Rebound project. Today, he has his own carpentry business and is able to lead a normal life. (©2012 Gilbertine Julie Uwimana/World Vision)

A few months ago, World Vision communicator Jeremie Olivier traveled to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and met children benefiting from World Vision’s Rebound project, which helps rehabilitate former child soldiers and prostitutes. Read about his encounter with Zawadi and how this teenager is finding her wings through mechanics.

[Guatemala bloggers] Here but there

Last month, Roo Ciambriello and seven other bloggers joined us in Guatemala, visiting World Vision's work there and witnessing child sponsorship at work. Back home now, Roo reflects on her experience and realizes how a simple yes to the trip has become so much more meaningful.

This post originally appeared on Roo’s blog, Neon Fresh.

Calling all heroes: Help the children of Syria

This month, we’re focusing on the Syrian refugee crisis and connecting it to our global #Dreamshare campaign -- asking our friends and supporters to visit the campaign site and share their dreams for the future of Syria and its people and refugees.

Jonathan Lo with the social media team talks about the dreams that the refugee children of Syria have for their own futures…and why they need some real-life heroes.

Syrian children: coping with trauma through drawing

Betsy Baldwin, program management officer for World Vision's humanitarian and emergency affairs team, writes today about a recent trip to Lebanon. Visiting Syrian refugee children who had fled their homes, Betsy witnessed firsthand the effects of the trauma these children had been through. Here, she describes the heartbreaking stories she saw illustrated by these children's hands.

Every child deserves a good night’s sleep

For Jonalyn and her family, the dangers of local Filipino mythology -- which tells of monsters that steal children away during the night -- are real. Now, through World Vision, they are able to sleep soundly at night, knowing their house is safe.