Tag Archives: child protection

Salmina escapes from early marriage

Salmina escapes from early marriage | World Vision Blog

Salmina, 16, escaped an arranged, early marriage in Mozambique and is looking forward to returning to school. (Photo: Leovigildo Pedro/World Vision)

16-year-old Salmina lives in Mozambique. Last year, at only 15, she felt that her life was at stake when she was forced to marry a 58-year-old man and leave school.

Thanks to a community member who was trained in child protection issues by World Vision, she escaped from the nightmare. Now she is looking forward to going back to school and pursuing her dream – of teaching mathematics. Read how World Vision is helping to raise awareness around this important issue.

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda | World Vision Blog

3-year-old Sharon in Uganda wears an earring – to protect her from child sacrifice. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

In certain districts of Uganda, child sacrifice is a real danger. Today, Kari Costanza writes from Uganda about 3-year-old Sharon, whose ear piercing may protect her.

Read how a World Vision-supported amber alert program is helping to recover children that have been taken.

A safe harbor

A safe harbor | World Vision Blog

Delfina (red shirt) and friends under the safe harbor of a mosquito net that Delfina's family received from World Vision. (Photo: 2012 Jon Warren/World Vision)

World Vision writer Kari Costanza reflects on taking sanctuary in her church's parking lot while being stuck in a snow storm last weekend, and how World Vision and our supporters are able to provide a safe harbor for millions of children around the world.

Protection through education

Protection through education | World Vision Blog

Before Ankit, 6, started attending World Vision's drop-in center last year, he used to roam the streets. (Photo: 2013 Annila Harris/World Vision)

One of the best ways to protect children from dangers like trafficking, child labor, and early marriage is to educate them, keeping them in school rather than on the streets. In India, World Vision's drop-in centers are designed to do just that: opening the door to mainstream schools.

Here are the stories of two children – Naina, 7, and Ankit, 6 – who found their way into formal education through these drop-in centers.

Under the big tree

Under the big tree | World Vision Blog

A World Vision savings group meets in Tanzania. (©2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Our staff writer Kari Costanza was at a community group meeting under a big tree in Tanzania when the principal of a nearby school brought a 6-year-old girl to them. She had run away from home … her father was planning to sell her as a wife.

This community group stood together and said "No!" See how we can be greater than child marriage, together.

Su Su is finding her own dream

Su Su is finding her own dream | World Vision Blog

18-year-old Su Su is learning skills as a hairdresser. Now she has hope for her dream of being a hair salon owner.

As a child, Su Su* worked a variety of jobs in Cambodia to help provide for her family, a road that led her into prostitution at the age of 14.

Through a World Vision recovery center, Su Su has learned the skills she needs to follow her dream. Now, she has real plans for her future.

This is her story in her own words.**

Roots and wings

Roots and wings | World Vision Blog

Zebra is a former child soldier who benefited from World Vision’s Rebound project. Today, he has his own carpentry business and is able to lead a normal life. (©2012 Gilbertine Julie Uwimana/World Vision)

A few months ago, World Vision communicator Jeremie Olivier traveled to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and met children benefiting from World Vision’s Rebound project, which helps rehabilitate former child soldiers and prostitutes. Read about his encounter with Zawadi and how this teenager is finding her wings through mechanics.

Calling all heroes: Help the children of Syria

This month, we’re focusing on the Syrian refugee crisis and connecting it to our global #Dreamshare campaign -- asking our friends and supporters to visit the campaign site and share their dreams for the future of Syria and its people and refugees.

Jonathan Lo with the social media team talks about the dreams that the refugee children of Syria have for their own futures…and why they need some real-life heroes.

Syrian children: coping with trauma through drawing

Betsy Baldwin, program management officer for World Vision's humanitarian and emergency affairs team, writes today about a recent trip to Lebanon. Visiting Syrian refugee children who had fled their homes, Betsy witnessed firsthand the effects of the trauma these children had been through. Here, she describes the heartbreaking stories she saw illustrated by these children's hands.

Why World Vision? For so many reasons

For the past 11 weeks, we’ve brought you an in-depth look into World Vision’s work around the world and why it’s effective. I had been working for World Vision for less than three months at the time we began this series, so developing all of this this content has been an amazing learning opportunity -- and a steep learning curve!

A vision of opportunity for child laborers

Combating forced labor is part of World Vision’s holistic approach to protecting children and ensuring that every child has the opportunity to experience life in all its fullness. World Vision works to address the root causes of child labor and create opportunities for affected children to get an education and leave jobs that are often dangerous, dirty, and degrading.

Today, we present the stories of two boys whose lives as child laborers are turning toward new opportunities through World Vision programs.