Tag Archives: child health

Health and happiness through clean water

Health and happiness through clean water | World Vision Blog

A new World Vision deep well brings health and happiness to the children of this village in Afghanistan. (©2013 Narges Ghafary/World Vision)

Unsafe water is one of the leading causes of child mortality in Afghanistan, with more than 40 percent of child deaths caused by diarrhea and acute respiratory infection. Clean water can prevent these illnesses. See how a World Vision deep well is changing life in young mother Maryam's village.

Proper nutrition for Mongolian babies

Today through August 7 is World Breastfeeding Week! Coordinated by UNICEF, the World Health Organization, and a variety of other partners, this year's theme highlights peer counseling programs for mothers.

Through World Vision, mothers and infants in Mongolia are benefiting from such initiatives. Find out how!

Walking with steps of faith

What is a father willing to do for his child’s health?

This is a question that Juan de Dios Castro answers immediately: “To give my life, if possible,” says this father while smiling at his almost 3-year-old son Noe, who runs into his arms, asking to play together with the soccer ball.

Infographic: A story of good health

Last week, we explored World Vision's WASH programs (water, sanitation, and hygiene), including the effectiveness of these programs in promoting better health in communities.

But World Vision's work in the health sector is much wider in scope than WASH programs alone! This week, we delve deeper into our impact in a wide variety of health issues -- including child and maternal health, HIV and AIDS, and malaria.

Afghanistan: Worst place to be a mother

Today's story comes from western Afghanistan, a region with one of the highest under-5 mortality rates and where maternal death in childbirth is a serious concern. The 10x10 film Girl Rising shows how these issues affect women in Afghanistan, and how education can help them.

St. Patrick's Day: Irish promote health in Africa

On this St. Patrick’s Day, I am honored to have the chance to tell all of our committed supporters about the work World Vision's advocates in Ireland are doing to assist communities in six African nations.

[Video] Without children, there is no future

For people in developing nations, health clinics are often the only link between them and the medicines they so desperately need.

Kris Allen, host of the 2012 True Spirit of Christmas Tour, had a chance to visit a health clinic in Bartabwa, Kenya. See how gifts given through the World Vision Gift Catalog are helping to save lives.

A picture of health

The mood is somber as babies wait to be examined and receive immunizations. I meet Purity, 30, and her 2-year-old son, Sheldon, while they were waiting to be seen. Sheldon suffers from high fever, poor appetite, diarrhea, and vomiting.

[Infographic] Is humanitarian aid really making a difference?

Is humanitarian aid really making a difference? The answer is yes! Child deaths have decreased by 41 percent over the past five years.

The following infographic explains major developments in global child health over the past 10 years.

Caring for two lives: Q & A with a midwife

“It is not an easy task to perform. I have [responsibility for] two lives at a time -- the mother and the baby,” says Aklima Begum, 48. Aklima lives in Bangladesh and is highly respected in her community. 

Thanks to World Vision, Aklima was able to be educated and certified as a midwife. Midwifery is an extremely important skill for her community, since many families can't afford to see a doctor or stay in a hospital. The lives of mothers and infants are put at risk when they don't have access to proper prenatal care or a safe birthing environment.

Through her education in midwifery, Aklima is able to provide skilled care to mothers who would otherwise have to go without it.

Let’s show the world our compassion and depth

One of my favorite bands is Band of Horses. I love all kinds of music and listen to different types, based on the mood I am in at that moment -- but I can always listen to Band of Horses. It’s all about their lyrics, which I find creative and often very thought-provoking.

Malaria: The disease that silences laughter

Today, I bought a coffin.

We spent the morning in a village in Mozambique visiting Marita, a dear little girl whose best friend had died of malaria last year.

Marita was still grieving. She sat quietly while the rest of the children played in high spirits, shouting and laughing through a game of soccer.

Marita’s mother invited us to come back later for supper. Hospitality can never be refused, even when the givers have so little. Marita’s father makes just $48 a year in a country to which both people and nature have been unkind.

PHOTOS: When empty shelves threaten lives

Here in the United States, when our little ones come down with common childhood illnesses, we have relatively easy access to over-the-counter medicines and supplies that can treat them and ease their suffering. Rarely, if ever, do such ailments become life-threatening.

Tragically, the opposite is often true in developing countries. Children who become ill with treatable conditions -- such as worms, diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria -- seek treatment at local clinics, but the shelves there are frequently empty. Poverty renders basic medicines and supplies unaffordable or inaccessible, and children's lives are needlessly placed at risk.

World Vision works with pharmaceutical companies and other corporate partners, who donate medications and medical supplies that we can ship and distribute to clinics around the world where they're needed most. The images below depict the problem -- and what we're doing to help solve it.

Malaria: Battling the "plague of the poor"

Today is World Malaria Day. One of the top killers of children globally, malaria remains a serious threat in African countries like Mozambique -- even though it's completely preventable and treatable, and even though it was eradicated here in the United States more than half a century ago.

Tom Costanza, a World Vision videographer, shares reflections from a trip to Mozambique, contrasting the elimination of malaria in the United States and its continued devastating effects, both on children and adults, in developing countries.

But simple solutions exist that save lives. And you can help.

Uganda: Visible progress for children

Uganda is one of 16 poor countries that are considered "trailblazers" for the progress they’ve made toward eliminating poverty and improving health. The nation is on track to meet at least half of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals by 2015.

Progress is hard-won, but encouraging. Here are some accomplishments to celebrate.

Global child malnutrition needs global response

My son, Joshua, recently turned 16 months old. (As a new parent, I’ve learned that we track our young children’s ages by months or even days rather than by years.) As Joshua grows, I witness him becoming increasingly independent and stubborn, particularly when it comes to eating.

Malaria: The source of a mother’s torment

World Malaria Day is coming up on April 25. This preventable, treatable disease was eradicated in the United States in the early 1950s -- but even today, it continues to devastate lives in places like Kenya, where simple interventions could end suffering for mothers like Elizabeth. Read her story below and consider how you can take action to help accomplish what was done in this country decades ago.

Uganda: Invisible child killers beyond Kony

For the past month or so, Uganda has seen attention in the media and among the American public that it hasn’t experienced in several years, thanks to the viral video phenomenon “Kony2012.”

But this story was no surprise to those of us who have worked at World Vision for a while.