Tag Archives: Bolivia Bloggers

[Bolivia bloggers] Day 2: The dread and joy of leaving & arriving.

The following was blogged last night in La Paz, Bolivia by Bolivia blogger Nish Weiseth at The Outdoor Wife and Deeper Story.

Erik had the car running outside in the garage. It was early. 4:00am-kinda-early.

My bags were loaded in the trunk of the hatchback and I quietly slipped back inside the house and made my way to Rowan’s door.

I put my ear against the cold painted wood and listened – I could hear him breathing heavily in his sleep on the other side. I turned the knob slowly and walked in, the hallway light just barely warming the room.

Standing next to the crib, I saw his back rise and fall with each deep breath he took.

[Bolivia bloggers] Day 2: I'll fly away

We’re just a few minutes away from boarding our plane to Bolivia. I’ve taken my high-altitude medication and am feeling slightly jittery. I also have to pee like every 15 minutes–which should be fun on the plane, yes?

The funny thing about traveling is that, well, unexpected things happen. My carry-on was too full and I had to re-shuffle my suitcases at the last minute while standing next to the ticketing counter (oh, my poor little tidy Clothing Bundles!!).

[Bolivia bloggers] Day 1: 3 airports down, 2 to go...

My morning started at 3:50 am, that's the time my first alarm went off. Three alarms later, I rushed to get up, panicking, thinking I was already late for my first flight. I quickly showered, finished throwing in last minute items into the suitcase, grabbed a bottle of water, then I was out the door.

By 6:30 am, I was through the long, dreaded security line, took my trek to the gate, and boarded my first of two flights for the day -- this one at Sea-Tac airport, the next in about four more hours at Dallas Fort Worth international airport.

Dallas welcomed me with 92 degree heat. I was certainly not in Seattle anymore. And Miami must have known I was coming, too, because it's still 90 degrees outside here, even at 7:45 in the evening. Now I'm just waiting for Ms. Elizabeth Esther and Ms. Nish Weiseth to arrive in the next hour or two. We lucky west coasters are staying the night here before everyone else arrives in the morning.

The next 9 days... headed to Bolivia

I'll soon be en route to Bolivia -- along with a few of my favorite colleagues and seven new friends -- so keeping multiple copies of my travel itinerary is absolutely necessary. I figure that this will help ensure that nobody accidentally boards the wrong plane(s).

Of course, that's the least of anyone's worries at this point. I need to finish packing. (Elizabeth Esther and Nish Weiseth beat me with the packing competition days ago.) And for many of my teammates, leaving home and their children is something really worth fearing. To hopefully lighten the anxiety a bit, I'm posting a bird's-eye view of our itinerary and agenda while we're in Bolivia.

Ask a humanitarian... Tough questions answered!

At the end of last week, Rachel Held Evans, one of the fabulous bloggers headed with us to Bolivia, asked her readers what tough questions they had about child sponsorship, humanitarian work, and World Vision. I dug for answers to the questions they asked with the help of colleagues across our organization.

Perhaps you or others you know have wondered what the answers are to these questions. And if you have any other questions for us, just ask!

Writing next time from Bolivia,

Carla


Here's a couple of my fave questions on Rachel's blog... (The follow is an excerpt from Rachel Held Evans' interview "Ask a humanitarian... (Carla responds)")

Question from Elizabeth: How does child sponsorship help the community at large and not just the individual children? Do the sponsored children end up using their education to just leave their poor communities behind? I have always worried about this.

World Vision’s work is always in the context of families and communities because children thrive when their families and communities are healthy. Our interventions depend on what the community needs.   Children who have access to good nutrition, clean water, basic healthcare, and educational opportunities are better prepared to build a future for themselves and their families and communities.

5 days out: Background on Bolivia

Less than one week to go before our team of 11 is in Bolivia, we're printing our travel itineraries and making dinner and to-do lists to leave at home while we're gone.

In a team phone call last week, I shared a trip brief (thanks to the assistance of many of my esteemed colleagues) with our team that provides cultural and political context to the areas we'll be visiting, photo and video guidelines, and key contact information. The portion below -- with facts and info about World Vision's work in Bolivia -- we're sharing with you as extended team members joining us (via our blogs and Twitter) in Bolivia, July 30-August 7. More to come later this week...

BOLIVIA, officially the Plurinational State of Bolivia

  • Bolivia, named after independence fighter Simon BOLIVAR, broke away from Spanish rule in 1825; much of its subsequent history has consisted of a series of nearly 200 coups and countercoups
  • Nicknamed “El Corazón de Sudamérica” (The Heart of South America) because of its location in the middle of the continent
  • Bolivia shares control of Lago Titicaca, the world's highest navigable lake (elevation 3,805 m [almost 12,500 ft.), with Peru
  • There are three official languages spoken in Bolivia (lucky we'll have a translator with us): Spanish- 60.7%, Quechua- 21.2%, Aymara- 14.6%
  • We'll be celebrating the Bolivian independence day while we're there on August 6 (1825; from Spain) in the capital city of La Paz
  • Currency is called Bolivianos
  • (Source: World Factbook)

Always enough love for one more

This note was simply too sweet not to share.

A little background: I first started talking to Debbie on our Facebook page, where she leaves us daily comments of encouragement. On Facebook, we've shared in Debbie's passion and deep love for all seven of her sponsored children. When she receives a letter from one of her "littles" from Thailand, Sierra Leone, Ethiopia, Brazil, Zambia, or Mexico, it makes our day, too. So when she heard about our bloggers trip to Bolivia, you can guess what she did next...


BOLIVIA BLOGGERS: Exploring sponsorship

You've probably read stories -- on this blog or elsewhere -- of how extreme poverty can create a vicious cycle of hardship and despair for families and communities. And maybe you've even heard of how World Vision child sponsorship helps break that cycle -- by providing essentials that empower families, like nutritious food, clean water, healthcare, education, training, and more.

But where does sponsorship become more than just a simple explanation? Here at World Vision, we're constantly asking ourselves: How do we make sponsorship a personal experience, where poverty and its remedies are embodied in the stories of real people and real places? And how can we connect our supporters with that?