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A contest to end malnutrition

A contest to end malnutrition | World Vision Blog

Women and children of Badnapur and Solamoh villages, who participated in the Nutrition Exhibition 2012, aiming to combat malnutrition with creative recipes and education. (Photo: 2012 Annila Harris/World Vision)

The Melghat region of India is known for its high rates of child malnutrition. In response to this challenge, World Vision India devised an innovative technique for change, not only targeting attitude and behavior, but also aiming to address the source of the problem, with … a cooking contest!

Memories of Tacloban

Memories of Tacloban | World Vision Blog

World Vision staff member Chris Weeks with Leo Quejada, Jr. in Tacloban. "Families we met, while still grieving, are mustering strength to rebuild their lives." (Photo: 2013 Crislyn Felisilda/World Vision)

Chris Weeks, from World Vision United Kingdom, describes his first experience of the devastated city of Tacloban in the Philippines. Now two weeks after the storm hit, relief efforts are well underway and reaching the survivors that need them while the people of Tacloban are finding the strength to begin rebuilding their city.

A gift unmatched

A gift unmatched | World Vision Blog

In September, the World Vision bloggers visited Monica, a former sponsored child, in her home in Guatemala and listened to her story. (Photo: Laura Reinhardt/World Vision)

Last September, 8 World Vision bloggers traveled to Guatemala to witness child sponsorship at work. In today’s post, blogger Roo Ciambriello reflects back on that trip and recalls a moment at the end of our visit with Monica, a former sponsored child, that taught us all a beautiful lesson about giving. This post originally appeared on Roo’s blog, Neon Fresh.

We're cheap, and that's good

We're cheap, and that's good | World Vision Blog

Families affected by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines receive Food Kits from World Vision. Each kit provides food for a family for seven days. (Photo: 2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

One of World Vision’s primary responses to disasters like Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines is the distribution of Family Food Kits and Hygiene Kits to survivors. On our Facebook page this week, we posted photos of the contents of these kits – but purchased here in the USA – and asked our followers to guess how much the items would cost. That price versus the price of each World Vision Kit might surprise you!

[Video] Rose's Planet Earth

[Video] Rose's Planet Earth

The Batican family stands among the rubble that was their home until coconut trees fell on it during Typhoon Haiyan in Ormoc, Philippines. Son Johpett Batican, 14, (blue shirt and glasses) is a World Vision sponsored child. (Photo: 2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Less than two weeks ago, for the people of the central islands of the Philippines, this beautiful planet turned harsh and scary. Now, the survivors of Typhoon Haiyan look ahead toward recovery with hope.

[Photoblog] Smiles of relief

[Photoblog] Smiles of relief | World Vision Blog

The promise of food for the next 15 days makes for happy children at a World Vision food distribution to Typhoon Haiyan victims in the Philippines. (Photo: 2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

On Thursday morning, World Vision completed a well-organized and calm distribution of food and hygiene kits in northern Cebu, benefiting 780 families, nearly 4,000 people.

This series of photos comes directly from our team on the ground in the Philippines, showing the smiles that this first distribution of relief supplies brought to the waiting survivors of Typhoon Haiyan.

Why did you bring me here, Lord?

Why did you bring me here, Lord? | World Vision Blog

World Vision completed a well-organized and calm distribution of food and hygiene kits in northern Cebu yesterday, benefiting 780 families – nearly 4,000 people. (Photo: 2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

An aid worker's diary: today, Mikhaela De Leon -- media engagement officer for World Vision Philippines -- reflects on her experience of Typhoon Haiyan and why God brought her to Tacloban on that day.

Voice of survivors: "I was shivering and looking at flying roofs"

Voice of survivors: "I was shivering and looking at flying roofs" | World Vision Blog

John, 4, hid first in his grandmother's house. Then he and his parents ran to the nearest village hall after Haiyan was tearing the house apart. (Photo: Lanelyn Carillo/World Vision)

In the devastating wake of Typhoon Haiyan (locally named Yolanda), a small table in a cramped village hall serves as baby Patrick’s new home. Curled in a corner, baby Patrick is in a deep sleep, unaware of what just happened in his hometown.

Recovering childhood in a safe space

Recovering childhood in a safe space | World Vision Blog

Chakkit, 6, came to the Child-Friendly Space dripping wet from swimming in the flood waters. He said, "I want to join and play games." Dry shirts were given to participants as most children came wearing wet clothes. (Photo: ©2013 Jay Mark Mijares/World Vision)

When Teerasak's home in Thailand flooded, his world was turned upside-down. Now, at a World Vision Child-Friendly Space, he and 40 other children have found a place where they can learn, play, talk about their experiences, and simply be kids again.

Friends without borders, part 2: Marina's story

Marina and Vjollca grew up on opposite sides of the Serbian-Albanian conflict. Now, as co-workers with World Vision, they've become friends. Together, they're working to break down the barriers between their cultures and to change the mentality of the next generation through World Vision's summer camps.

Friends without borders, part 1: Vjollca's story

I went to Kosovo to learn about friendship between Serbian and Albanian children. Growing up in Albania, I often heard how these two groups live and work in close proximity but hardly ever interact.

I wanted to explore the friendships forming between the two groups of the new generation. It seemed the best place to do this was from the inside, so attending one of World Vision’s summer camps was a good place to start.

Philippines: Youth active in disaster preparedness

After Typhoon Washi hit the Philippines in 2011, many communities began participating in World Vision's child-focused disaster risk reduction training.

Now, in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan, widely reported to be the strongest tropical cyclone in history, our prayers go out to the people of the Philippines, hoping that advance training and emergency plans will help mitigate the destruction left by this storm.

Aaron Aspi, communicator for World Vision in the Philippines, describes last summer's disaster risk-reduction training.

Helping others along his life's journey

In Gudiyattam, India, World Vision's Born to be Free program works to help children stay in school through economic assistance, children's clubs, and other projects.

Sathyaraj, a former sponsored child, completed his education through World Vision's programs and is now an advocate for children's issues, wanting his village to be a model for the whole country.

An aid worker's diary: Earthquake in the Philippines

Maryann Zamora, a field communications specialist with World Vision in the Philippines, describes her firsthand experience of the 7.2-magnitude earthquake that struck the Philippines on October 15 -- and why she continues to do the work she does, despite her fears.

[Q&A] Water for the World Act

In today's Q&A, Lisa Bos -- World Vision's policy adviser for health, education, and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) in Washington, D.C. -- describes the Water for the World Act and explains why this new legislation is vital for providing clean water where it's most needed. Lisa is an expert when it comes to this bill -- she helped write it!

Halloween: More than candy and costumes

October 31 used to mean more than candy and costumes. Many cultures celebrated summer’s end — marking the close of the harvest season as the world transitioned into the darker, colder half of the year.

Today in the United States, most of our food is available year-round, with the exception of certain seasonal produce. But in many nations, farmers still rely on the seasons and a good harvest for their family’s survival and income for the entire year. World Vision works with farmers such as Morm Sem in Cambodia to help them increase their productivity.

Nicholas and Nikolaus

World Vision writer Kari Costanza contrasts the life of her son, Nicholas, with the life of a young man she met in Tanzania, named Nikolaus. Both college-aged, her son Nicholas is in college pursuing his dreams; Nikolaus and his family are struggling to have hope for the future.

Find out how World Vision's programs will soon offer Nikolaus that hope.