Our Blog

Redeeming what was once lost

Today's story comes from India, where Amit and his family have undergone a remarkable journey from the darkest depths of poverty to a sense of renewed hope and freedom from potentially tragic outcomes -- like street begging and dangerous labor.

Putting words into action

Romanita Hairston, World Vision's vice president for U.S. programs, recently had the opportunity to attend the presidential inauguration on January 21, 2013. Today, she reflects on our nation's future and challenges us to help children in need in the United States.

Confidence through contortion

Contortion -- the art of flexing and bending your body into jaw-dropping positions -- is a highly-respected, centuries-old tradition in Mongolia. As part of its development program in the area, World Vision supports a contortion class to help children have fun and develop social skills.

Inauguration Day: What’s Next?

On Martin Luther King Day, the national attention is centered on the start of Obama’s second administration. Following Election Day—when voters also approved a number of measures opposed by many Christians—many felt the country seemed to be headed in the wrong direction. At least, that’s how it appeared to some Christian leaders and commentators. One called it “a catastrophe for crucial moral concerns.” At the same time, the federal budget, political impasse, and a host of problems divide the nation. What are we, as Christians, to do?

Pray for the people of Mali

Mali enjoyed two decades of democratic rule until the growing rebel insurgency led to a military coup in March 2012, leaving the former French colony with a weakened government. World Vision began working here in 1975 and is especially concerned for displaced children and families as fighting escalates in the north. Please join World Vision in prayer for the people of Mali.

The right to have a name

The national identity card is helping to ensure that children from the Miramar community in Peru have access to their fundamental rights -- like medical care and community programs. Carmen shares how this piece of identification has changed her life -- and the lives of her children.

Film Director Ditches Convention to tell Girls’ Stories

The director of a soon-to-be-released film charting the lives of girls struggling to get an education in some of the world’s toughest places deliberately abandoned the techniques of conventional documentary filmmaking.

The film Girl Rising, whose narrators include Meryl Streep, Kerry Washington, and Selena Gomez, is due for theatrical release in March.

Aid worker's diary: returning to Goma

During the recent conflict in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, I was evacuated along with other World Vision colleagues to Gisenyi, Rwanda, a town a little more than a mile across the border.

We were later allowed to return to Goma to help civilians who had been displaced. Rebels of the March 23 (M23) movement were in charge of the city, and thousands of people had lost their homes and sense of stability.

Haiti: Rebuilding what has been broken

On January 12, 2010, a 7.0-magnitude earthquake shook Haiti and shaped a generation. While its duration was brief, the devastation it caused continues to affect the people of this small country -- the poorest in the Western Hemisphere. Three years later, Haiti is still in repair, but not without hope.

Supporting teachers in Los Angeles

Educating children must be a priority for helping build a better future. This is true in any part of the world -- including our own nation.

On December 6, World Vision staff drove a large trailer packed with essential educational supplies into the parking lot at Roosevelt High School in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles. This mobile Teacher Resource Center is a new way World Vision is supporting teachers in under-resourced communities.

Kenya through Kris' eyes

Since I’ve gotten back from World Vision's 2012 True Spirit of Christmas Tour, I'm frequently asked: “Didn’t you go to Kenya?  How was that?”

I’m never one to answer really fast, because I always want to give a real answer. I could just say, “It was great!” -- and the conversation would end there, but that would defeat the purpose of why I went.

I went so I could tell people about what’s going on in Kenya and what World Vision is doing to help out.

Top 12 blogs of 2012

 

As a World Vision staff member, I find myself surrounded each day by stories, many of which break my heart. I'm forced to stop whatever I'm doing, gather myself, and say a prayer for someone I have never met.

Other times, my heart swells with hope, and my eyes are filled with tears of joy.

What these stories have in common is that behind each one is a person whose voice needs to be heard. Over the past year, the World Vision Blog has been filled with voices from around the world -- asking for help, grieving, or celebrating progress. These are our top stories from 2012.

[Photo blog] 12 moments from 2012

World Vision staff around the globe shot more than 10,000 photos this year. Working in nearly 100 countries, they documented the year’s most urgent humanitarian emergencies as well as moments of inner strength and joy. Here are 12 memorable photos from 2012.

5 tips on choosing a charity for year end giving

As the end of the year closes in, time is running out on tax deductible donations. Before you choose a charity to donate to, read these 5 tips to make sure you are giving to an organization that will use your money to make an impact. Be sure to get your donations in by 9:00 EST on December 31st.

A burden that children should never have to bear

An 8-year-old Syrian refugee child named Layla* shares, “I saw my cousin dying in front of me, so I always see this scene in front of my eyes.”

As children all over North America happily rummage through the cheerful remains of Christmas Day’s joys -- festive gift wrap strewn about, the latest version of Halo blaring from 40-inch television screens -- the existence of Syrian children presently seeking refuge in Lebanon is one far less carefree.

In this season of joy, it’s difficult to fathom that at least 66,000 children like Layla are coping with the loss of home and childhood as their families struggle to survive the displacement of war and onset of a cold, snowy winter in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley.