Our Blog

Rita's story: Standing strong against hunger

John Iwasaki, senior writer for World Vision's U.S. Programs, tells the story of Rita Lujan, a cancer survivor who struggles to make ends meet for her family. With the help of World Vision food kits, Rita is standing strong: "God doesn't give you more than you can chew."

Yemi’s story: empowering youth toward change

Penn State sophomore and World Vision Youth Empowerment Program (YEP) alumna Yemi Olugbuyi is motivating other students to create positive change in their lives and communities.

During the past school semester, Yemi started a YEP chapter on the Penn State campus in Schuylkill, Pennsylvania. YEP focuses on helping youth develop skills in leadership, civic engagement, critical thinking, advocacy, and team building.

Why World Vision? Rebuilding hope at home

1 in 5 American children live in poverty. By equipping local organizations, responding to disasters here in the United States, and empowering our youth, World Vision works to strengthen communities throughout America -- as well as abroad.

Today’s infographic gives an overview of our U.S. programs.

Boots on the ground in Haiti: Meet our disaster response expert

After the earthquake that devastated Haiti in January 2010, World Vision's Jeff Wright, operations director for humanitarian and emergency affairs, was among our first responders.

Why World Vision? In today's Q&A, Jeff describes what it's like to deploy to a disaster zone and how World Vision's disaster response makes a difference -- both then and now.

[Photos] Rebuilding Tuscaloosa

As I saw images from Moore, Oklahoma, flash across my screen in May, I was immediately brought back to similar scenes of devastation that took place in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, in 2011. I thought about how World Vision was just finishing up its disaster response to that deadly tornado, two years after it touched down.

Syrian refugee crisis: The true value of water

What do you know about water?

Before I went to Lebanon, I knew that it is life-saving and that clean water is key to preventing diseases. But I never realized how much its value extends beyond that. I never understood the dignity and comfort that it can offer people in hard times -- until this past month.

Syrian refugee crisis: Three things you should know

Joy Toose, social media manager for World Vision Australia, spent a month reporting from Lebanon about the Syrian refugees who fled there to escape violence in their home country. Today, she shares three things that she learned about the refugee crisis that you should know, too.

Our disaster response: First in, last out

People living in poverty are more vulnerable when disasters strike. With over 90 percent of deaths caused by natural disasters occurring in developing countries, World Vision's community development approach is essential to strengthening communities in advance of disasters. But we're also pre-positioned to respond so we can start our relief work immediately when a disaster strikes.

Today's infographic shows how our disaster response works.

Meet our child protection expert: Part 2

Why World Vision? In the second of this two-part Q&A (if you missed it, read part 1 here), Matthew Stephens, senior specialist for child protection with World Vision, explores how our community development work and child sponsorship program help protect children from abuse, neglect, exploitation, and violence.

Meet our child protection expert: Part 1

Why World Vision? In this 2-part Q&A (check back for part 2 tomorrow!), Matthew Stephens, senior specialist for child protection with World Vision, explores how our community development work and child sponsorship program help protect children from abuse, neglect, exploitation, and violence.

A vision of opportunity for child laborers

Combating forced labor is part of World Vision’s holistic approach to protecting children and ensuring that every child has the opportunity to experience life in all its fullness. World Vision works to address the root causes of child labor and create opportunities for affected children to get an education and leave jobs that are often dangerous, dirty, and degrading.

Today, we present the stories of two boys whose lives as child laborers are turning toward new opportunities through World Vision programs.

A modern-day slave’s second chance

The International Labor Organization estimates that at least 20.9 million men, women, and children around the world suffer in forced labor, though the actual number could be closer to 27 million. Further, 55 percent of victims of forced labor are women, and girls comprise 98 percent of sex trafficking victims.

Chanty* was one of them -- but now she has a second chance.

Shared visions and big returns: The multiplying impact of advocacy

Today, Jesse Eaves, World Vision's senior policy adviser for child protection in Washington, D.C., describes how child sponsorship is an investment in a child's future, and how advocacy -- speaking out on behalf of those affected by poverty and injustice -- increases the return on that investment.

Why World Vision? Life in all its fullness

Around the world, there are 115 million children trapped in hazardous child labor, and millions more are victims of abuse and other forms of exploitation. Under such conditions, children cannot experience fullness of life. World Vision works to protect children by preventing exploitation and abuse, by restoring children that have been abused, and by speaking out about child protection issues.

Today’s infographic illustrates our work in this sector.

[Video] Sheila Walsh: Seeing the bigger picture

The World Vision Artist Program is celebrating a great milestone: 1 million children sponsored over the past 25 years! We've asked a few of our artists to reflect on what it has meant to partner with World Vision in helping children have hope for the future.

Today, World Vision Artist speaker, author, Bible teacher, and singer Sheila Walsh writes about a recent trip to Ethiopia where she met one of her sponsored children and saw the bigger picture of what child sponsorship is all about.

Education: The path to change in Syria

In honor of World Refugee Day today, Joy Toose — social media manager for World Vision Australia — writes from Lebanon about the need for education among refugees and World Vision’s work in Lebanon that is making possible an education for refugee children.

Top 8: Alternative graduation gifts from World Vision’s Gift Catalog

Are you looking for an alternative gift for your recent or soon-to-be graduate? Something meaningful, something that will make a real difference in the world while honoring this milestone in their education?

World Vision’s Gift Catalog has a variety of amazing gifts that you can donate in someone’s honor and make a real-world difference. Here are our top eight Gift Catalog recommendations for your graduate.

Why World Vision? Educating children for life

Worldwide, 67 million elementary-aged children are not enrolled in school. Every one of them is at greater risk of exploitation, early marriage, and lower income over the course of their life. World Vision works to break down the barriers that keep kids out of school and to ensure that students receive a quality education. Today’s infographic shows how.