PHOTOS: Helping vulnerable children survive to 5

In places of poverty, the first five years of a child's life are the most deadly -- and if a child lives to the age of 5, his or her chances for survival increase dramatically.

There are a few basic reasons why children under 5 die of preventable causes -- such as severe malnutrition, diarrhea, malaria, and neonatal infections -- and there are simple solutions to prevent those causes. The Survive to Five™ Challenge is World Vision's focused, high-impact way to give children every chance for survival.

Here are some images that show World Vision's interventions to help stop preventable child deaths around the world -- made possible with the support of our generous donors.

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Shukria, a midwife in training through World Vision

Shukria, a midwife-in-training through World Vision's multi-year assistance program for child and maternal health in Afghanistan, cares for a newborn baby. (Nila Akbari/World Vision)

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Nearly 9 months pregnant, Oeung Pheng, 33, regularly goes to her local health center in Cambodia to get her health checked. She is pregnant with her fifth child. She delivered the first three babies at home. But consulting with a midwife has helped her care better for her own health and that of her unborn baby.

Nearly 9 months pregnant, Oeung Pheng, 33, regularly goes to her local health center in Cambodia to get her health checked. She is pregnant with her fifth child. She delivered the first three babies at home. But consulting with a midwife has helped her care better for her own health and that of her unborn baby. (Sopheak Kong/World Vision)

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This child is staying at a World Vision-supported shelter for abused women and girls in the northeast Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The shelter has served more than 7,000 affected by conflict in the DRC. Some 80 percent of the women and girls there have been sexually abused.

This child is staying at a World Vision-supported shelter for abused women and girls in the northeast Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The shelter has served more than 7,000 affected by conflict in the DRC. Eighty percent of the women and girls there have been sexually abused. (Jon Warren/World Vision)

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Makonda, a 2-year-old baby boy, receives a blood transfusion for treatment of malaria at Mapamboli Clinic in the DRC, built by World Vision. His worried mother, Mandiangu, 20, and grandmother, Nlandu, sit with him.

Makonda, a 2-year-old baby boy, receives a blood transfusion for treatment of malaria at Mapamboli Clinic in the DRC, built by World Vision. His worried mother, Mandiangu, 20, and grandmother, Nlandu, sit with him. (Jon Warren/World Vision)

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Sabina enjoys time with her baby daughter, Dorcas. Sabina used to spend four hours each day fetching water from a dirty river. But a World Vision water project has brought clean, safe water much closer.

Sabina enjoys time with her baby daughter, Dorcas. Sabina used to spend four hours each day fetching water from a dirty river. But a World Vision water project has brought clean, safe water much closer to her home in Kenya. (Jon Warren/World Vision)

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Betinha

Betinha's mother received nutritional training through World Vision in Mozambique. Now, the little girl receives a healthier diet. (Antonio Matimbe/World Vision)

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In Sudan, a child is immunized by a vaccination team at a World Vision health center. More than 1,250 children are immunized on a monthly basis at health centers here.

In Sudan, a child is immunized by a vaccination team at a World Vision health center. More than 1,250 children are immunized on a monthly basis at health centers here. (Mohamad Almahady/World Vision)

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Potipher, a baby born prematurely at home, is ill and is being screened by health officers at a clinic in Zambia.

Potipher, a baby born prematurely at home, is ill and is being screened by health officers at a clinic in Zambia. (Collins Kaumba/World Vision)

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Baby Joyce enjoys the warmth of a new blanket. Seida says the blanket will not only benefit Joyce, but also her next child. After receiving a new blanket from World Vision, Seida will no longer have to worry about how to keep her daughter warm.

Baby Joyce enjoys the warmth of a new blanket. Seida says the blanket will not only benefit Joyce, but also her next child. After receiving a new blanket from World Vision, Seida will no longer have to worry about how to keep her daughter warm. (Collins Kaumba/World Vision)


Make a donation today to World Vision's Survive to Five™ Challenge. Thanks to government grants, your gift will triple in impact to help provide life-saving interventions like vaccinations, nutritious food, clean water, bed nets to prevent malaria, skilled birth attendants, and more.

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