Stories

Friends without borders, part 1: Vjollca's story

I went to Kosovo to learn about friendship between Serbian and Albanian children. Growing up in Albania, I often heard how these two groups live and work in close proximity but hardly ever interact.

I wanted to explore the friendships forming between the two groups of the new generation. It seemed the best place to do this was from the inside, so attending one of World Vision’s summer camps was a good place to start.

Nicholas and Nikolaus

World Vision writer Kari Costanza contrasts the life of her son, Nicholas, with the life of a young man she met in Tanzania, named Nikolaus. Both college-aged, her son Nicholas is in college pursuing his dreams; Nikolaus and his family are struggling to have hope for the future.

Find out how World Vision's programs will soon offer Nikolaus that hope.

A part of my family

Peggy King, a child sponsor since 1986, included World Vision in her estate plan so she can continue helping her sponsored children and others like them -- even after she’s gone. This is her story.

The therapeutic power of tea

Life in the Indian village of Mawlyngot used to revolve around the brewery, which led many toward alcoholism. Now, through a World Vision initiative, the villagers plant and harvest tea instead -- bringing about a therapeutic transformation for everyone.

Jeremiah dares to dream

In 2010, Jeremiah tested positive for HIV, then lost his wife four days after she gave birth, leaving him with eight children to care for. Feeling alone and afraid, he sought counseling from World Vision.

Several years later, he is the happy beneficiary of World Vision's livelihood project and is able to take care of his family. Now, he dares to dream about his future.

Walking for water, riding for life

“My overshirt is off, my hat is off, and I’m really sucking air at this point.”

This is a snapshot of Mark Smith struggling with a 55-pound jug of water in the middle of sweltering Ethiopia. It certainly isn’t where you’d expect to find the owner of the most successful Harley Davidson shop in the United States.

A legacy of change

Ten years ago, families in impoverished communities in southern Peru like Cusipata were focused exclusively on agriculture and ways to earn money to survive. In their struggles against poverty, parents were distanced from their children, who became last in receiving attention and love.

But thanks to World Vision’s work, this community has changed, and now parents put their hope in their children for sustainable development.