Partnerships

Initiation of a NASCAR novice

Initiation of a NASCAR novice | World Vision Blog

Martin Truex Jr. with his #78 race car, both displaying World Vision orange and logos, and his Furniture Row Racing garage team in Kentucky. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

This past weekend, thanks to the generosity of Furniture Row Racing, NASCAR driver Martin Truex Jr.'s #78 car was wrapped in World Vision's colors and logo for the Quaker State 400 Sprint Cup race in Kentucky!

A World Vision team, along with our Kisongo Trek Experience Truck, were on site to support our new partnership and capture photos and videos of the race. Writer Chris Huber reflects on his experience.

Put yourself aside and lend a helping hand

Scott Smith from K-LOVE radio is traveling with World Vision to raise 1,000 sponsorships. They're flying around the world -- literally! -- traveling westward to visit communities in Thailand, India, Ethiopia, and Brazil.

This blog post and video come from Scott's visit to India, where his heart was broken for the people he met. Find out why.

World Poetry Day: "Padre" / "Father" by Senna (featured in Girl Rising)

The 10x10 campaign film, Girl Rising, features a teenager named Senna, who lives in a mountain community in Peru. While pursuing her education, she discovered a passion and wonderful talent for poetry.

Today, in celebration of World Poetry Day, we bring you "Padre" ("Father") by Senna.

Changing the world, one game at a time

This week, World Vision is celebrating the launch of Half the Sky Movement: The Game.

Created by Pulitzer Prize-winning authors Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, this new game is an online adventure that aims to reach mainstream audiences to raise both awareness and donations to empower women and girls around the world.

JD the DJ reaches out

World Vision is partnering with national radio network K-LOVE -- which includes more than 400 contemporary Christian radio stations -- to help children around the world Survive to 5.

Today, Andrea Peer profiles JD Chandler, a DJ at K-LOVE who will host a radiothon on November 20 to help find sponsors for children in need.

Gaming for a greater cause

World Vision recently announced an exciting new partnership that reaches into territory we've never been before: online gaming.

Verge Games created Grumpy Goats with the aim to provide an online gaming experience with a greater purpose: donating a real goat to a family in need through World Vision's Gift Catalog.

Today's guest contributor, Bob Regular, president of Verge Games, shares his vision and heart for this idea.

When half a camel is enough

Today's guest contributor, bestselling author Debbie Macomber, shares her story of teaching her grandchildren a powerful lesson on charity and compassion. Her publisher, Random House, made a generous donation to support World Vision's work to improve education here in the United States.

A cup of coffee? Or water for a village?

In 2010, World Vision magazine published a story about Kathy Williams, a manager at Family Christian store in Killeen, Texas. Through a bottle of dirty water, she struck up conversations with customers -- conversations that resulted in hundreds of child sponsorships.

Because of Kathy's voice of change in her community, she was invited to visit World Vision projects in Swaziland with Austin, Texas area pastors and community leaders. After witnessing World Vision's work in Swaziland, she wrote the following reflection.


Jesus, the comic-book superhero

How often do you get the chance to read comic books at work? What about one that is centered around Jesus and the Christmas story -- or one that benefits the work of an international humanitarian organization?

Not often? Or never? That's why we've asked Billy Tucci, a new World Vision partner, writer, and award-winning comic book illustrator, to guest-post for us on his newest comic book, A Child is Born.

*     *     *

“Dad, why do you want to do the birth of Jesus instead of a superhero book?”

My eldest son wasn’t the first person to ask why, in a genre dominated by capes and cowls, would anyone do a comic book on the Christmas story?

A classic Christmas story goes Veggie!

I am usually a stickler on no-Christmas-stuff-until-Thanksgiving-is-done rule. I want to experience one holiday at a time -- mixing pilgrims with Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree is just too much for me!

But, this year, I caved.

In November, I opened up my mailbox to find a new VeggieTales DVD -- a Christmas Veggie Tales movie, "The Little Drummer Boy." I couldn't tell my kids to wait several weeks before we watched it, right? Right?! We had to sit down immediately and see what Bob and Larry were up to!

And I'm so glad we did.

My 5 favorite things about Tanzania (a post for your kids)

On this blog, we've had a variety of guest bloggers in the past -- Mark Hall from Casting Crowns; Josh Loveless from Relevant Magazine; Reneé Stearns, wife of World Vision president Rich Stearns; and Adam Jeske from InterVarsity.

But we've never had a guest blogger quite like this one.

He's a newcomer to the blogging world, a well-respected teacher to many, and a lover of God's children and kingdom. He's known to be a bit of a health addict, a vegetarian, really big on going green. A believer in diversity of friendships, the company he enjoys comes in all shapes and sizes -- a bit beyond the garden-variety, if we can say so. Although he's become quite the movie star, he's managed stay humble and down-to-earth.

Following Coach Richt to Honduras -- a trip that changes lives

Special thanks to Steve Hummer, Sunday sports feature writer at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, for guest-blogging this post for us. Following the UGA sports blog's May 25 post and our May 31 post, Steve joined University of Georgia football coach Mark Richt and his wife, Katharyn, in Honduras to witness World Vision's work there.


World Vision? What’s that? An optician with delusions of grandeur? A new psychic helpline? A few months ago, I had no idea.

Then there came a curious off-season story from the most watched sports beat here at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution: University of Georgia football. Bulldogs fans were all atwitter over a report that head coach Mark Richt had put his vacation lake home up for sale. That prompted wide speculation that after two disappointing seasons he was selling off as a hedge against the possibility of being fired this year.

Bad news... good news

Editor's note: This article originally appeared in the first-ever issue of Reject Apathy.

Earthquakes. Tsunamis. Nuclear disasters. Crazed dictators. War. Sex trafficking. Blood diamonds. Rape. Poverty. Racism. Disease.

The stark reality of all the “bad news” in the world can leave you reeling. Like a high school physics equation with a minute amount of force working against a massive, immovable object, at times it can feel impossible to make a significant impact.

But consider one more piece of bad news: According to World Vision, 24,000 children die each day around the world from preventable causes. Preventable causes.

We may not be able to stop a tsunami, but we can prevent malaria deaths by providing inexpensive mosquito nets. We may not be able to halt a tank, but we can end the fatal transmission of parasites by equipping impoverished communities with sanitary water for drinking and cooking. We may not be able to cure AIDS (yet), but we can supply medicines that prevent transmission of HIV from a pregnant mother to her unborn child and that extend the lives of AIDS patients so their children aren’t left orphaned.

There are many things we cannot do—but there are countless things we can. And there’s a new opportunity to directly provide medicine and clean water to impoverished children around the world that may surprise you...

One cup at a time

I first met Christian Kar, CEO of the One Cup Project, back in November at a local church conference. I was there with the World Vision Micro team, and Christian was there with his team. One Cup was a new World Vision corporate partner choosing to use its business to fuel hope in other countries -- by making donations from every coffee sale to support our work in Zambia. Together, we were representing the power that donations and personal purchases have on social and economic change in other countries.

I've met with Christian and his team many times since then. Our work together makes us "business partners," but our common goal to help others make us friends. I can vouch that he and his team embody every bit of brilliance and kindness you feel from their emails. They represent the spirit of an entrepreneur with the compassion of a humanitarian. They make One Cup's mission -- to tell a different story about business -- personal, believable, and contagious. It makes you want to join their team in their pursuit to change people's purchasing choices, one cup at a time.

Lindsey (L): Where does your coffee story begin?

[caption id="attachment_4778" align="alignright" width="250" caption="Christian at his coffee roaster. Photo courtesy of the One Cup Project."]One cup at a time | World Vision Blog[/caption]

Christian (C): I've been intensely focused on building a coffee enterprise since I was 19. You could say I didn’t choose coffee -- it chose me. I was sort of at the right place at the right time, and while I didn’t set out to be in coffee, I loved the people side of the business and grew to love coffee as well. The coffee business brought me out of my shell. I started with retail, then began roasting, and the business grew steadily year over year. Success seemed to come easy.

L: At the height of your coffee enterprise success, what was "game-changer" in dreaming up the One Cup Project?

C: My wife and I both surrendered our lives to Christ shortly after the 9/11 attacks. We both knew in our souls that all was not right in the world. As my faith began to mature over the next few years, I asked myself, "Is this it? Am I just going to be the coffee guy for 20 more years?" Then God planted the “seed” for the One Cup Project. In 2007, I went on a short-term missions trip to Kenya. God had laid Africa on my heart for reasons I can’t understand. I went, and my eyes were opened.

When commerce and charity share a mission

Whoever said that fashion can't make a difference in our world? Surely, if people can wear their hearts on their sleeve, they can definitely wear their cause.

I recently chatted with Kevin Murray, CEO of Jedidiah, who talked about the company's unique ability to artistically connect fashion to social causes so everyone can make a measurable difference in the world. Their collections are available online and in select retailers. *World Vision is the beneficiary of Jedidiah's Spring and Summer 2011 collections.

Tell me about the humanitarian mission behind Jedidiah...

Jedidiah's mission is “to use apparel sales as a vehicle to provide care, support and financial resources to those in need." We do this by partnering with amazing NGO’s each season. Really, our model is the collision of commerce and charity. I believe that social enterprises and business models with embedded generosity have the potential to change history and effect social causes like never before.

How do you think this belief resonates with Jedidiah supporters?

I think their deepest desire is to be part of something bigger than themselves and to make a real difference. America is the most compassionate country the world has ever seen. But maybe people don’t know how to engage or be part of the compassion movement. We ask for consumers to support our apparel brand as a way of getting involved and having a voice. But for that support, we, in turn, owe them a great product, with great design, built with integrity and style. If we don’t measure up to our peers in the apparel industry than we don’t deserve to be in business. A quality product at a fair price is crucial to our growth as a company.

So how did World Vision become part of the picture?

Our family has supported World Vision sponsored children for many years. I have always thought of World Vision as one of the most productive and efficient NGO’s and have been a huge fan for a long time. I love the way World Vision starts at the individual level. The model of changing one person’s life -- that can then change a family, a community, a city and a nation -- is one I believe in with all my heart.

I also know you have a huge heart for the child trafficking cause...

I am the father of three daughters. The idea that children are bought and sold for the pleasure of others is the saddest, darkest part of humanity I have ever seen. So with World Vision, we chose to commit our Spring and Summer 2011 charitable sales to fund a trauma recovery center in Cambodia that will help hundreds of children who are rescued from this life.

The brighter side of a shark bite

Imagine being a champion surfer and one day having a shark bite off your arm. Not only will you have to live through the rest of your life with one arm, your surfing career might well be at an end. Is there a bright side to this story?

We wrote about Bethany Hamilton in the Spring 2006 issue of World Vision magazine. And her extraordinary story is now the subject of the major motion picture “Soul Surfer,” due for release on April 8 and starring AnnaSophia Robb, Helen Hunt, and Dennis Quaid.

[caption id="attachment_3598" align="alignright" width="254" caption="At the World Vision transitional housing center, Bethany talks with 13-year-old Ketsara who lost her mother and home to the tsunami, comparing the lessons they learned on how to handle tragedy and loss. (Jon Warren/WV)"][/caption]

Bethany did indeed lose her arm to a tiger shark when she was just 13, but within a month she was back in the water, trying to find the next great wave. That spirit gave World Vision an idea. Following the Asian tsunami, fishing communities we were working with in Thailand had become petrified of the ocean from which they derived their living. Could Bethany help?

Bethany traveled to Phuket, where she talked with villagers about her own devastating ocean experience. One of her key points: Shark attacks and tsunamis are rare events; we ought not allow them to dictate the way we live the rest of our lives. Bethany persuaded some village youngsters to head into the ocean with her, where—much to their delight—she gave them their first-ever surfing lesson.

In partnership news...

Companies face hundreds of decisions every day, decisions that have the potential to affect people’s lives. So when companies choose to partner with World Vision, it’s a decision that always humbles me. It says a lot about a company’s ethos when they choose to give their time and resources to bettering the world around them. It says we want to help make a difference in our world; we want to positively affect people’s lives.

A special thank you to these companies who have recently shared with us in the incredible opportunity we have to partner with one another in building a better world for children.

100,000 reasons to love the Super Bowl

Maybe you were one of the 151 million people to watch the Green Bay Packers victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers in yesterday’s Super Bowl XLV. If you’re not a sports fan, surely you still enjoyed the cheeseburger sliders, nachos, great commercials, and good time with friends and family. Certainly, there is nothing quite like American football ...