Food & Agriculture

Halloween: More than candy and costumes

October 31 used to mean more than candy and costumes. Many cultures celebrated summer’s end — marking the close of the harvest season as the world transitioned into the darker, colder half of the year.

Today in the United States, most of our food is available year-round, with the exception of certain seasonal produce. But in many nations, farmers still rely on the seasons and a good harvest for their family’s survival and income for the entire year. World Vision works with farmers such as Morm Sem in Cambodia to help them increase their productivity.

Transforming child health through better nutrition

Join us in celebrating World Food Day today!

Tran Thi Mui, a young mother in rural Vietnam, was sad to learn that her first child, Vu Viet Ha, was malnourished. Child malnutrition can lead to reduced mental and physical development as children grow. Aware of this danger, Mui was determined to change her daughter’s situation by continuing to participate in her nutrition club supported by World Vision.

Anis: a young farmer from Alor

Yohanes, 17, usually called Anis, is a sponsored child from Alor, Indonesia, with a talent for gardening. His father left during his childhood, and his mother is visually impaired. Living through these troubles has made him resilient. He has a dream to become a farmer who is not only useful for his family but also for his community. Through World Vision’s support, Anis has been a sponsored child since he was in the second grade, and his family received roofing and piping for their home four years ago.

[Video] What's so great about nutrition

World Vision's work in the Food and Agriculture sector seeks not only to feed the hungry, but to ensure that the food they eat provides the proper nutrition for a healthy life. This approach is part of our community development — we work to empower communities to grow or buy the foods they need and, in turn, well-nourished people are better prepared to contribute to their communities.

Why World Vision? Providing the key to food security

Week 1 of our Why World Vision? campaign explored our holistic approach to community development, and for the past two weeks we've looked at how both WASH (Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene) and Health programs strengthen communities.

This week, we delve into our work with Food & Agriculture — a variety of programs designed to increase food security and provide better nutrition for children, families, and communities.

How much is a life worth?

In the news business, there's a saying that goes, “One dead fireman in Brooklyn is worth five English bobbies, who are worth fifty Arabs, who are worth five hundred Africans.” I quoted this in my first book, The Hole in Our Gospel.

It’s understandable that we identify and sympathize with the people closest to us. We have a harder time empathizing with people who are somehow removed -- whether geographically, culturally, religiously, or nationally. It’s normal.

But it’s not okay.

HungerFree: The solutions manifesto

Wafts of sweet strawberries mingle with the earthy tones of potatoes as I walk beneath an awning covering a bustling sidewalk. I’m completing a weekly tradition of mine, shopping at the local farmers market. And, to be honest, taking in a bit of people-watching.

On this bright Saturday afternoon in Washington, D.C., I see the happy faces of families and friends enjoying the day. Each person is carefree as they wind through overflowing crates of produce.

But here’s the irony: Although I work on behalf of children who have much less than I do, I walk through this market on the weekends sometimes just for fun.

In South Sudan, a connection between conflict and hunger

With more food on the planet than ever before, it's difficult to believe that people still go hungry every day. You might assume that natural disasters, drought, or a lack of access to necessary farming equipment are to blame for a lack of food. What may surprise you, though, is that conflict is a leading cause of hunger.

Currently, conflict between Sudan and South Sudan is causing food shortages affecting millions, leaving children most vulnerable. While it is easy to see the role that a natural disaster or drought plays in hunger, the connection between conflict and hunger can be complicated. To make this complex issue easier to understand, World Vision's James Addis outlines some key questions below.

30 Hour Famine: A crash course in global hunger

This weekend, thousands of students across the country will participate in World Vision's 30 Hour Famine -- an event where teenagers fast for 30 hours, learn about global hunger, and raise funds to feed and care for hungry children around the world.

Nicole, a home-school mom and youth leader, started doing the Famine when she was 16. Nicole offers some incredible insight, having seen the Famine from the perspective of both a student and a leader. We asked her to share why she does the Famine.

Caring for God's creation on Earth Day

Today is Earth Day, an opportunity to step back and appreciate the care and detail God put into creating our universe. God is an amazing artist, and He has set creation before us to show us His glory and remind us of His love. Psalm 95:3-5 tells us: "For the LORD is the great God, the great King above all gods. In his hand are the depths of the earth, and the mountain peaks belong to him. The sea is his, for he made it, and his hands formed the dry land." In Seattle, where I live, this verse comes to life all the time -- natural beauty is evident all around me. Lush green trees, beautiful mountain ranges, numerous lakes, and the Puget Sound remind me of God’s creativity and craftsmanship daily. Spring has brought cherry blossoms and daffodils in abundance. Everywhere I look, I see His awe-inspiring creation.

One small cry: Hassane's fight against malnutrition

Lauren Fisher, emergency communications manager with World Vision, has been deployed to Niger for five weeks.  Throughout West Africa, as many as 23 million people may be affected by the hunger crisis there in the coming months, including 13 million in World Vision's program areas. Follow Lauren here on our blog or @WorldVisionNews (#wvlauren) for live, on-the-ground reports from the field.

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It was the best moment of the day. Not the warm smiles and waves of the villagers, not the sound and sight of sparkling, precious water hitting the waiting buckets, not even the laughs of children seeing how my camera worked.

Instead, the moment that brought us all to laughs, clapping, and even near tears came from one little wail from a tiny 2-year-old.

The nurse had tried to change the angle of the Plumpy’Nut™ little Hassane was clutching so tightly. Moments before, he was all but motionless in his mother’s arms, reacting only with shrieks as the nurse at the child nutrition clinic tried to weigh him.

We didn’t need the red marker of the band measuring his arm circumference to tell that he was severely malnourished. With tiny arms and legs, little Hassane looked to me much more like a small infant than a boy who was nearly a toddler. He weighed just 16 pounds.