Food & Agriculture

Celebrating harvests around the world

Celebrating harvests around the world | World Vision Blog

18-month-old Aminat and his grandfather Ibrahim play in their fields at dawn in Antsokia Valley, Ethiopia. (Photo: ©2014 Alexander Whittle/World Vision)

Halloween traces its roots back to ancient harvest festivals.

Today, five of our staff writers from around the world – India, Ethiopia, Cambodia, Honduras, and Bolivia – describe how the harvest season is traditionally celebrated in their part of the world!

The Lord of the harvest

The Lord of the harvest | World Vision Blog

Farmers threshing wheat in Ethiopia. (Photo: 2004 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Jesus refers to God as "the Lord of the harvest" (Matthew 9:38). How do you reflect God's bounty in your everyday life?

Guest blogger Benjamin L. Corey encourages us to put God in his place this harvest season.

Early Adopters

Early Adopters | World Vision Blog

Miychele with his family in Zambia. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

When staff writer Kari Costanza visited sponsored child Mutinta's family in Zambia, she witnessed their vibrant transformation through World Vision's programs. Not only had they received clean water, livestock, and school supplies, her father Miychele had planted a huge orchard!

Read how Miychele's early adoption of farming techniques helped keep his family healthy and happy!

Hunger like a weed

Hunger like a weed | World Vision

Five-year-old Dayana in her classroom in Nicaragua. (Photo: 2014 Eugene Lee/World Vision)

When families struggle with hunger, many have to choose between feeding their children and sending them to school.

Read how World Vision sponsorship is helping to uproot the weeds of hunger from Dayana's family in Nicaragua.

A strategy for nutrition

A strategy for nutrition | World Vision Blog

At 18 months, Rita in Nepal was malnourished, but today she is getting the nutrition she needs and is healthy! (Photo: 2012 Alina Shrestha/World Vision)

There is no one solution to malnutrition. But the new five-year U.S. Government nutrition strategy and World Vision's development model are designed to address all of its causes.

Read how this new strategy is designed to reduce stunting and save lives!

From famine to harvest

From famine to harvest | World Vision Blog

The Antsokia Valley during Ethiopia's drought and famine of 1984-'86 was a parched dust bowl where 60,000 people were starving. By August 1989, due to return of rainfall and extensive development led by World Vision, the valley was green again and resistant to future famines. (Photo: 1989 Bruce Brander/World Vision)

30 years ago, a severe drought and famine struck Ethiopia, and within five years, World Vision's relief work there had become one of the best examples of our development model.

But the impact of our work became more than a famine-to-harvest story. As we mark 30 years of progress in Ethiopia's Antsokia Valley, read how that work also led to a deeper kind of transformation.

Coffee love

Coffee love | World Vision Blog

Christine working on The Good Coffee farm with her baby girl, Christella, on her back. Christine was 5 when the genocide began. (©2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Happy International Coffee Day!

Read how a World Vision cooperative coffee growing program helped transform the hatred caused by the Rwandan genocide into forgiveness and love.

A contest to end malnutrition

A contest to end malnutrition | World Vision Blog

Women and children of Badnapur and Solamoh villages, who participated in the Nutrition Exhibition 2012, aiming to combat malnutrition with creative recipes and education. (Photo: 2012 Annila Harris/World Vision)

The Melghat region of India is known for its high rates of child malnutrition. In response to this challenge, World Vision India devised an innovative technique for change, not only targeting attitude and behavior, but also aiming to address the source of the problem, with … a cooking contest!

Halloween: More than candy and costumes

October 31 used to mean more than candy and costumes. Many cultures celebrated summer’s end — marking the close of the harvest season as the world transitioned into the darker, colder half of the year.

Today in the United States, most of our food is available year-round, with the exception of certain seasonal produce. But in many nations, farmers still rely on the seasons and a good harvest for their family’s survival and income for the entire year. World Vision works with farmers such as Morm Sem in Cambodia to help them increase their productivity.

Transforming child health through better nutrition

Join us in celebrating World Food Day today!

Tran Thi Mui, a young mother in rural Vietnam, was sad to learn that her first child, Vu Viet Ha, was malnourished. Child malnutrition can lead to reduced mental and physical development as children grow. Aware of this danger, Mui was determined to change her daughter’s situation by continuing to participate in her nutrition club supported by World Vision.

Proper nutrition for Mongolian babies

Today through August 7 is World Breastfeeding Week! Coordinated by UNICEF, the World Health Organization, and a variety of other partners, this year's theme highlights peer counseling programs for mothers.

Through World Vision, mothers and infants in Mongolia are benefiting from such initiatives. Find out how!

Anis: a young farmer from Alor

Yohanes, 17, usually called Anis, is a sponsored child from Alor, Indonesia, with a talent for gardening. His father left during his childhood, and his mother is visually impaired. Living through these troubles has made him resilient. He has a dream to become a farmer who is not only useful for his family but also for his community. Through World Vision’s support, Anis has been a sponsored child since he was in the second grade, and his family received roofing and piping for their home four years ago.

[Video] What's so great about nutrition

World Vision's work in the Food and Agriculture sector seeks not only to feed the hungry, but to ensure that the food they eat provides the proper nutrition for a healthy life. This approach is part of our community development — we work to empower communities to grow or buy the foods they need and, in turn, well-nourished people are better prepared to contribute to their communities.

Why World Vision? Providing the key to food security

Week 1 of our Why World Vision? campaign explored our holistic approach to community development, and for the past two weeks we've looked at how both WASH (Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene) and Health programs strengthen communities.

This week, we delve into our work with Food & Agriculture — a variety of programs designed to increase food security and provide better nutrition for children, families, and communities.

Securing the future of Turkana

Having witnessed ghastly scenes of malnourished and hungry children and mothers in Turkana, Kenya, in 2011, I returned a year later and witnessed a total transformation.

World Vision is busy working on recovery and resilience-building programs that are rapidly changing the picture of this region of East Africa.

How much is a life worth?

In the news business, there's a saying that goes, “One dead fireman in Brooklyn is worth five English bobbies, who are worth fifty Arabs, who are worth five hundred Africans.” I quoted this in my first book, The Hole in Our Gospel.

It’s understandable that we identify and sympathize with the people closest to us. We have a harder time empathizing with people who are somehow removed -- whether geographically, culturally, religiously, or nationally. It’s normal.

But it’s not okay.

HungerFree: The solutions manifesto

Wafts of sweet strawberries mingle with the earthy tones of potatoes as I walk beneath an awning covering a bustling sidewalk. I’m completing a weekly tradition of mine, shopping at the local farmers market. And, to be honest, taking in a bit of people-watching.

On this bright Saturday afternoon in Washington, D.C., I see the happy faces of families and friends enjoying the day. Each person is carefree as they wind through overflowing crates of produce.

But here’s the irony: Although I work on behalf of children who have much less than I do, I walk through this market on the weekends sometimes just for fun.