Education

Literacy begins before school

Literacy begins before school | World Vision Blog

5-year-old Mugisha in Burundi learned to write and read before he began school through a World Vision reading camp. (Photo: ©2013 Achel Bayisenge/World Vision)

Today is International Literacy Day!

In eastern Burundi, an initial reading assessment of 560 school children revealed that only 26 percent of second graders are able to read and differentiate consonants from vowels.

For some children, this is changing. Mugisha, a five-year-old first grader, is one of them. He knew how to write and read before he started primary school, thanks to World Vision.

A way out of illiteracy

A way out of illiteracy | World Vision Blog

Celebrate World Book and Copyright Day with us today!

After a survey found that more than 40% of school children in a district of Ethiopia couldn't read, World Vision piloted a reading camps program. Read how these camps are transforming literacy and the lives of children in Ethiopia, and our plans for the future!

Opportunity in broken chalk

Opportunity in broken chalk | World Vision Blog

Amina with her siblings, and behind them the brown chalkboard that Amina uses to teach them. (Photo: 2014 Jessica Biseko/World Vision)

As a sponsored child, Amina – 11, from Tanzania – is able to go to school. But her siblings aren’t as fortunate. To help give them a future, too, she collects pieces of broken chalk along what she learns and brings it all home to teach her siblings herself!

Protection through education

Protection through education | World Vision Blog

Before Ankit, 6, started attending World Vision's drop-in center last year, he used to roam the streets. (Photo: 2013 Annila Harris/World Vision)

One of the best ways to protect children from dangers like trafficking, child labor, and early marriage is to educate them, keeping them in school rather than on the streets. In India, World Vision's drop-in centers are designed to do just that: opening the door to mainstream schools.

Here are the stories of two children – Naina, 7, and Ankit, 6 – who found their way into formal education through these drop-in centers.

Gautam's sweet dreams

Gautam's sweet dreams | World Vision Blog

Gautam and his mother, Joyanti. (Photo: 2013 Md. Golam Ehsanul Habib/World Vision)

Saturday was Human Trafficking Awareness Day! How did you spread the word about this important issue?

Today's story comes from Bangladesh, where millions of children are caught up in child labor when their families can't afford to provide. Two years ago, Gautam's family couldn't afford more than two meals a day, to repair their home, or to send Gautam to school; now, Gautam sleeps well with a new roof and full belly, and goes to school. See how sponsorship helped keep him out of child labor!

Day 10: Share a smile

Day 10: Share a smile

Latha in India smiles broadly when she talks about her education and how proud she is to be in the 12th grade. She used to be a child laborer, but has a new future now because of education. Today’s video tells her story!

Helping others along his life's journey

In Gudiyattam, India, World Vision's Born to be Free program works to help children stay in school through economic assistance, children's clubs, and other projects.

Sathyaraj, a former sponsored child, completed his education through World Vision's programs and is now an advocate for children's issues, wanting his village to be a model for the whole country.

Sabra’s village on the path to educating girls

“Every morning when my brother used to get ready for school, I used to cry over my fate,” Sabra, now 14, remembers. She would ask herself, “Why am I a girl? I used to think that if I had been a boy then I would have been blessed with the most precious gift in the world – education.”

A stitch in time empowers

In India, there is a long-standing tradition that women serve men and maintain the home. Many drop out of school; some never venture outside their homes at all.

Through World Vision training programs, women like Jyoti and Khadija receive training in tailoring as well as sewing machines, empowering them to open their own tailor shops and inspire the next generation.

Learning harmony through musical education

In a classroom, when a teacher combines musical knowledge, passion, and patience with a group of children thrilled by music, the results are extraordinary.

This is what is happening in Escolarte, a World Vision school of music and art in Sabana Perdida, in the Dominican Republic, where 40 children between the ages of 5 and 8 attend musical education classes.

Why World Vision? Educating children for life

Worldwide, 67 million elementary-aged children are not enrolled in school. Every one of them is at greater risk of exploitation, early marriage, and lower income over the course of their life. World Vision works to break down the barriers that keep kids out of school and to ensure that students receive a quality education. Today’s infographic shows how.

[Video] Jason thanks his mother for his education

Jason was a sponsored child from Vida Nueva, a World Vision program in Costa Rica. The community completed its 15-year process in 2012. Challenged to make a video about education, Jason decided to interview his mother, thanking her for the opportunities she has worked to give him.

World Vision promotes literacy through donated books

Did you know that today is World Book and Copyright Day? Probably not -- but it's a great opportunity for us to highlight World Vision's commitment to education and literacy across the globe.

Here's a story from a World Vision area development program in Zambia, where we've distributed a total of 2,144 books and helped to promote literacy in communities there.

Learning to count at age 15

Today's story comes from the slums of New Delhi, India. Sonam's family struggled to make a living, so education wasn't a priority for her life. In many developing countries, this is a reality faced by young girls, as depicted in the film Girl Rising.

[Video] Now I know my ABC's

For may students in the United States, singing the ABCs is one of the first lessons in the classroom. You might be surprised to learn that children in Bartabwa, Kenya, know a very similar version. See for yourself as Kris Allen sings with elementary school students.

A bicycle, and the change it brought

Pushpa is a shy 15-year-old sponsored girl in the tenth grade. In her small village in India, she's known for great achievements.

Looking back on the uncertainty she's experienced recently, Pushpa is glad to be back in school -- with a bicycle to take her there.

A place to learn and call home

It’s been nearly three years since the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and many people there are still living in squalid conditions in camps. Families who had the means to leave the camps have now gone, and those remaining are among Port-au-Prince’s most vulnerable.

Knowing that even one child living in an unsafe and unsanitary camp is too many, World Vision is working on a project to help families move out of camps and into more durable accommodations. With World Vision helping to shoulder the burden of housing, families are able to invest their resources into their children's educations -- and most importantly, their futures.

A girl's journey from brick factory worker to outstanding student

Today has been declared by the United Nations as the International day of the Girl. To commemorate this day, we're asking you to advocate on behalf of girls like Keota in Cambodia.

A brick factory is no place for an 11-year-old girl. But each day, Keota would spend hours stacking heavy bricks in a dusty, dangerous workplace to supplement her parents' meager income.

Now, thanks to World Vision, Keota is back in school, earning good grades and helping her little sisters with their studies.

New wheels get Gracious back to the classroom

Thursday is the first-ever International Day of the Girl. To commemorate this event, we're spending several days highlighting issues faced by girls who live in poverty around the world, such as early marriage and vicious exploitation. We're also talking about how access to an education can equip girls to live full lives and reach their God-given potential.

The story of Gracious illustrates just that. This 14-year-old girl has a passion for learning that has stopped at nothing -- even when her life was turned upside-down by an unforeseen tragedy.