Disaster Relief

“I had no friends”

“I had no friends” | World Vision Blog

Children play games at a Child Friendly Space started and staffed by World Vision in South Sudan. (Photo: 2015 Jon Warren/World Vision)

For children affected by conflict and disaster, back-to-school season means getting back to basics: making friends, feeling safe.

See how 15-year-old Deng in South Sudan found friendship and safety … and is able to keep his dreams alive.

Rain could soon turn to snow

Rain could soon turn to snow | World Vision Blog

Four-year-old Nagisa with her father—refugees who were caught in the rain as they passed through Belgrade, Serbia. (Photo: Laura Reinhardt/World Vision)

Our photographer Laura Reinhardt returned from Serbia this week, where she was meeting refugees and capturing their experiences as they passed through.

Written last Friday: see Serbia through her eyes, the current conditions in which these refugees are living, and the cold, damp future Laura sees in store for them.

A day I will never forget

A day I will never forget | World Vision Blog

Ibrahim (in yellow), an 8-year old Syrian refugee, has to work for long hours in a field in Lebanon, earning $6 a day. His family has no other choice to survive. (Photo: Mona Daoud/World Vision)

The heartbreaking, eyewitness account about a Syrian refugee boy, 8-year-old Ibrahim, and the abuse he endures as a field laborer in Lebanon so his family can survive.

Hear the testimony of our Lebanon staffer who met him, and her call for help on this International Day of Peace.

The emotion of a simple gesture

The emotion of a simple gesture | World Vision Blog

A Syrian refugee family walking along the Serbia/Hungary border. (Photo: Laura Reinhardt/World Vision)

Right now, our writer/photographer Laura Reinhardt is on the Serbian border with Hungary among the refugees from Syria.

Meet with us this family of three that Laura met in passing yesterday, and hear why this father is making their long, difficult journey for the sake of his infant daughter.

Syria crisis: Nowhere to go

Syria crisis: Nowhere to go | World Vision Blog

Abdul and Noor slept on the ground with their family near the Serbia/Hungary border last night. (Photo: Laura Reinhardt/World Vision)

Meet Abdul and Noor. Last night and the night before, they slept on the ground near the Serbian border with Hungary. Our staff met them yesterday and for a moment were able to bring smiles to their faces.

See the current situation for these Syrian refugees, what their journey has been like, and what their future might hold.

When we are bit players in someone else’s story

When we are bit players in someone else’s story | World Vision Blog

Four-year-old Yusef with his father. They are refugees from Syria who walked 15 hours from Macedonia to reach Serbia. (Photo: 2015 Aida Sunje/World Vision)

In Europe and the Middle East, a story has been unfolding for more than four years, and the "small, unexciting acts of love" that we can make are part of it.

Today, blogger Addie Zierman writes about the big, beautiful story God is telling, and how we're all involved.

Humanitarian heroes

Humanitarian heroes | World Vision Blog

World Vision staffer Madeleine Bilonda with displaced children in South Sudan. (Photo: 2015 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Thirteen years ago today, 22 aid workers were killed in a bombing at U.N. headquarters in Baghdad. In remembrance, August 19 was declared World Humanitarian Day to honor all those who have lost their lives in humanitarian service and to celebrate the spirit that inspires people to serve.

With 45,000 people serving World Vision in nearly 100 countries, today we honor those who work in the hardest places. Read the stories of three humanitarian heroes working in the newest and most fragile country in the world: South Sudan. After decades of fighting for independence, South Sudan became a country in 2011 and has been embroiled in a civil war since 2013.

Education or bread

Education or bread | World Vision Blog

14-year-old Ali works at three shops in Lebanon to help his refugee family survive. (Photo: 2014 Patricia Mouamar/World Vision)

The stories of two 14-year-old boys who, living as Syrian refugees in Lebanon, have to be the breadwinners for their families.

See how they balance the choices between bread and education, between pursuing their dreams and survival.

Our mother died because she ran too slow

Our mother died because she ran too slow | World Vision Blog

World Vision Staff member Michael Angkok with 4 orphaned siblings he helped unite with relatives in South Sudan. (Photo: 2015 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Today is World Refugee Day: a day of awareness and renewed committments to help those displaced by conflict and disaster.

Our team recently traveled to South Sudan, where they met a family of four siblings, orphaned and displaced by war.

Read their story.

Syria crisis: Stand up for children living in the margins

Syria crisis: Stand up for children living in the margins | World Vision Blog

World Vision videographer Nathan Shain in Lebanon. (Photo: 2015 Adam Jeske)

Our videographer Nathan Shain traveled to Lebanon this spring to visit Syrian refugee families. He was so moved by his experience, that he set up a personalized fundraising page to support our relief efforts.

See Nathan's Instagram photos and a new video from his trip, and learn how you can set up your own fundraising page!

Where is the Church?

Where is the church? | World Vision Blog

This little girl is a Syrian refugee living in the Shatila Refugee Camp in southern Lebanon. (Photo: 2015 Adam Jeske)

Our Chief Catalyst Steve Haas just returned from visiting Syrian refugees and Christian leaders in Lebanon.

“In light of the greatest migration of refugee people in our lifetime, the Church is standing in a critical gap, showing the love and compassion of Christ to their neighbor.”

But do we care enough? Are we doing enough?

Nepal earthquake: Strangers wanted her little boys

Nepal earthquake: Strangers wanted her little boys | World Vision Blog

7-year-old Aaram and his family are vulnerable to a variety of dangers after losing their house in the Nepal earthquake. (Photo: Theodore Sam/World Vision)

A week after Nepal's deadly earthquake, families are still living out in the open, in tents, in the cold, afraid of aftershocks and returning to unstable, damaged homes.

A few days ago, a stranger approached Kanchi, a mother of three, and asked to adopt her two boys.

See how World Vision works to protect children from a variety of dangers after disaster strikes.

Nepal earthquake: Up close and personal

Nepal earthquake: Up close and personal | World Vision Blog

Matt Stephens in Bhaktapur, Nepal 30 minutes before Saturday's earthquake. (Photo: World Vision)

World Vision U.S. staffer Matt Stephens was in Nepal last week for a conference. On Saturday, he was standing in Durbar Square in Bhaktapur where the photo above was taken.

Half an hour later, a 7.8 earthquake struck, toppling the temple behind him. Experience this disaster and World Vision's response through his eyes.

Living in a conflict zone

Living in a conflict zone | World Vision Blog

Displaced by conflict in Iraq: 27-year old Angham with her 3-year-old Ghazal. “Life is hard living away from our place and knowing our house was destroyed. But I am thankful we are all safe.” (Photo: 2015 World Vision)

As humanitarian development work makes progress against poverty, extreme poverty is receding into the margins: places where disasters, conflict, and other causes push communities from being resilient to vulnerable.

See what it's like to grow up and work in conflict zones first-hand from one of our aid-workers in Iraq.

South Sudan: An invitation to pray

South Sudan: An invitation to pray | World Vision Blog

Dr. Joel Smith spoon feeds a starving baby in a World Vision feeding center. (Photo: 1998 Jon Warren/World Vision)

After a severe famine in 1998 and a 2011 war for independence, the people of the new South Sudan remain in extreme vulnerability through renewed conflict and food insecurity.

On Sunday, our writer/photographer team Kari Costanza and Jon Warren fly to Juba to visit our work among the families displaced by conflict.

See what they're expecting and hoping to find on this visit, and how you can help support them.

Syrian children: “The future depends on us”

Syrian children: “The future depends on us” | World Vision Blog

16-year-old Syrian refugee Ammar has lived in a refugee camp in Jordan for almost 3 years, and hasn't been able to attend school. (Photo: 2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Growing up in conflict, displaced, and as refugees, the children of Syria have become a vulnerable generation—at risk of being lost altogether—without access to the things they need to be successful in life.

The future doesn't belong only to the children who grow up in peace.

It belongs to every child.

The faces that stay with you

The faces that stay with you | World Vision Blog

Syrian refugee Ghaziyye with her one of her 4-year-old twin daughters in Lebanon. (Photo: 2013 Lauren Fisher/World Vision)

13-year-old Oujelan. Ghaziyye and her twin girls. 4-year-old Saad, who's forgotten how to play—these are some of the faces that have stayed with today's writer, Lauren Fisher, who visited Lebanon a year ago.

Today, Lauren reflects on the people she met and celebrates the ways that World Vision's work with the Syrian refugees has helped them and many more, and continues.

Syria: Refugees in winter

Syria: Refugees in winter | World Vision Blog

Photo: 2015 Ralph Baydoun/World Vision

World Vision’s Sevil Omer recently traveled to the Middle East, serving with our Syria crisis response, based in Amman, Jordan. She shares insights and the latest from our work providing winter relief to the most vulnerable affected by Syria’s conflict: Children.

Join us as we partner with One Day's Wages to double your ability to help children and families displaced by conflict in Syria and Iraq! For every dollar you give to One Day's Wages' World Vision campaign, they will match, up to $50,000.