Disaster Relief

Rwanda 20 years: Why I was afraid

Rwanda 20 years: Why I was afraid  | World Vision Blog

After the 1994 genocide, World Vision's work in Rwanda helped give Zaphran (center) a new life and family. (Photo: 2007 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Seven years ago, staff writer Kari Costanza visited Rwanda for the first time. She was able to replace her fear about the trip because of stories like Zaphran’s.

World Vision’s early work in Rwanda immediately following the genocide focused on peace-building, livelihood training, water and sanitation, agriculture, education, and health issues like malaria and maternal and child health.

Read how these programs helped reconstruct a new orphan’s world … and her sense of family.

The children of Syria speak as year four begins

The children of Syria speak as year four begins | World Vision Blog

Syrian children come together in Jordan to write a message to the world. (Photo: World Vision)

As we mark the three-year anniversary of the Syrian refugee crisis today, the children of Syria speak out together, making an urgent plea to the world to listen. To help. Stand with World Vision in helping to prevent a lost generation of Syrian children.

Read more about this report written by children to the world.

A hope to sustain us

A hope to sustain us | World Vision Blog

Syrian refugee children in host communities are living invisible lives. (Photo: 2013 Meg Sattler/World Vision)

“Where there is breath, there is hope,” Meg Sattler writes today from Jordan about the children of Syria and their stories and voices crying out to be heard.

Will you listen?

Two different crises, three years later

Two different crises, three years later | World Vision Blog

Boys play outside at a Child-Friendly Space after the 2011 earthquake in Japan. (Photo: 2011 Kei Itoh/World Vision)

Three years ago today, the strongest earthquake ever to hit Japan and the subsequent tsunami devastated its northeastern coastal communities, killing more than 15,000 people.

Coincidentally, this weekend will mark three years since the start of the Syrian crisis that continues to impact millions of lives in the Middle East and beyond.

These notable anniversaries — both devastating — depict a marked difference between what the humanitarian world refers to as “slow-” versus “sudden-” onset emergencies.

What should I do for Lent?

What should I do for Lent? | World Vision Blog

This 13-year-old girl and her youngest brother are Syrian refugees. They live in a tent in Lebanon. (©2014 Nicholas Ralph/World Vision)

This Lenten season will see the Syrian refugee crisis enter its fourth year.

Today for Ash Wednesday, Nathaniel Hurd, a World Vision policy adviser in Washington, D.C., writes about how the traditional Lenten sacrifices of prayer, fasting, and almsgiving can help the people of Syria.

My encounter with a child of Syria

My encounter with a child of Syria | World Vision Blog

15-year-old Ola speaks articulately about issues facing Syrian children. (©2014 Meg Sattler/World Vision)

For three years, too many innocent people in Syria have suffered — above all, the #childrenofSyria. They have seen homes, schools, and hospitals destroyed. They have borne the brunt of indiscriminate violence and witnessed unspeakable abuse. Millions have been forced to flee, while millions more are trapped inside Syria in horrific conditions.

Join World Vision, Save the Children, Mercy Corps, UNICEF, and UNHCR in preventing a lost generation of Syrian children. Sign our petition here.

Today, Meg Sattler, World Vision's communications manager for the Syria crisis response, describes meeting one of these children of Syria — a girl whose laughter would give way to tears without warning.

Bath time brings tears

Bath time brings tears | World Vision Blog

Lauren Fisher with Syrian refugee Ghaziyye and her 4-year-old twin girls. (Photo: ©2013 Ralph Baydoun/World Vision)

Lauren Fisher, World Vision emergency communications officer, writes about meeting Ghaziyye and her twin girls, age 4, who are living as refugees in Lebanon.

What brought this mother to tears wasn't the violence or fear or having lost everything; it was that her girls were always dirty. Read how a simple provision from World Vision has wiped away those tears.

Everything

Everything | World Vision Blog

Hamze, 8, a refugee in Lebanon, answers the question, "What do you miss about home?" (Photo: 2014 Nicholas Ralph/World Vision)

Today, we hear the voices of Syrian refugee children:

An 8-year-old Syrian boy named Hamze, who is living as a refugee in Lebanon, answers the question, "What do you miss about home?"

And a video: children answer the question, "What does peace mean?"

Why should Christians care about Syria?

Why should Christians care about Syria? | World Vision Blog

Syrian refugee children in host communities are living invisible lives. Only one of the children shown above is enrolled in school. (Photo: 2013 Meg Sattler/World Vision)

In today’s blog, we ask a variety of Christian thought leaders why we as Christians should care about the conflict in Syria, a crisis that day to day often feels very far from us. Or someone else’s problem.

Hear what seven writers have to say about this question, including bloggers Ron Edmondson and Matthew Paul Turner, and our very own president, Rich Stearns.

South Sudan conflict: Left in danger

South Sudan conflict: The poor are left in danger | World Vision Blog

Margaret and her children at a Catholic church where they’ve taken shelter in Juba. (©2014 Nhial Wei/World Vision)

Medina and Margret are just two among hundreds of thousands in South Sudan who have been driven from their homes by the fighting that escalated last month. Left with little in a disrupted economy, they want to take their families away from the conflict but can’t afford to, leaving them to seek sanctuary wherever they can. Read the story of these two families, and learn what World Vision is doing to help.

Five things you need to know about Syria's refugee crisis

Five things you need to know about Syria's refugee crisis | World Vision Blog

Jordan continues to face one of the harshest winters on record and many refugees do not have winter clothing. World Vision is now distributing over 30,000 winter coats to children aged 2-12 living in Za'atari Refugee Camp. (Photo: 2014 World Vision)

Now in its third winter, the toll of the Syrian refugee crisis continues to rise. Here are five facts you should know about this crisis, and what World Vision is doing to help.

The Apple of my eye

The apple of my eye | World Vision Blog

Sponsored child Apple takes care of her baby sister, Roalyn. Apple's family is one of many affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Their home was damaged by the typhoon. (©2013 Annila Harris/World Vision)

Today marks two months since Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the Philippines. After the storm, World Vision communicator Annila Harris visited survivors and met sponsored child Apple, whose family is benefiting from World Vision relief supplies. The way this little girl cared for her baby sister, Roalyn, taught Annila that even when a disaster takes away almost everything, the most important thing in life is still family.

Aid worker’s blog: Each other’s miracle

Aid worker's blog: Each other's miracle | World Vision Blog

Even after Typhoon Haiyan totally destroyed their house, the family of sponsored child Juliana remains grateful that they are alive. (©2013 Florence Joy Maluyo/World Vision)

Wednesday marks two months since Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the Philippines, causing immense devastation and loss of life. World Vision quickly mobilized more than 200 local staff members to help reach almost 400,000 survivors with relief operations.

Today, Florence, one of our team members on the ground, reflects on the past two months and the amazing love and hope she has felt from around the world as we all became each other’s miracle.

Day 16: Share a meal

Day 16: Share a meal | World Vision Blog

World Vision is sharing joy across the United States by providing Family Food Kits to people who are going hungry because of natural disasters, homelessness, or job loss. Learn more with today’s video.

Memories of Tacloban

Memories of Tacloban | World Vision Blog

World Vision staff member Chris Weeks with Leo Quejada, Jr. in Tacloban. "Families we met, while still grieving, are mustering strength to rebuild their lives." (Photo: 2013 Crislyn Felisilda/World Vision)

Chris Weeks, from World Vision United Kingdom, describes his first experience of the devastated city of Tacloban in the Philippines. Now two weeks after the storm hit, relief efforts are well underway and reaching the survivors that need them while the people of Tacloban are finding the strength to begin rebuilding their city.

We're cheap, and that's good

We're cheap, and that's good | World Vision Blog

Families affected by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines receive Food Kits from World Vision. Each kit provides food for a family for seven days. (Photo: 2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

One of World Vision’s primary responses to disasters like Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines is the distribution of Family Food Kits and Hygiene Kits to survivors. On our Facebook page this week, we posted photos of the contents of these kits – but purchased here in the USA – and asked our followers to guess how much the items would cost. That price versus the price of each World Vision Kit might surprise you!

[Video] Rose's Planet Earth

[Video] Rose's Planet Earth

The Batican family stands among the rubble that was their home until coconut trees fell on it during Typhoon Haiyan in Ormoc, Philippines. Son Johpett Batican, 14, (blue shirt and glasses) is a World Vision sponsored child. (Photo: 2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Less than two weeks ago, for the people of the central islands of the Philippines, this beautiful planet turned harsh and scary. Now, the survivors of Typhoon Haiyan look ahead toward recovery with hope.

[Photoblog] Smiles of relief

[Photoblog] Smiles of relief | World Vision Blog

The promise of food for the next 15 days makes for happy children at a World Vision food distribution to Typhoon Haiyan victims in the Philippines. (Photo: 2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

On Thursday morning, World Vision completed a well-organized and calm distribution of food and hygiene kits in northern Cebu, benefiting 780 families, nearly 4,000 people.

This series of photos comes directly from our team on the ground in the Philippines, showing the smiles that this first distribution of relief supplies brought to the waiting survivors of Typhoon Haiyan.

Voice of survivors: "I was shivering and looking at flying roofs"

Voice of survivors: "I was shivering and looking at flying roofs" | World Vision Blog

John, 4, hid first in his grandmother's house. Then he and his parents ran to the nearest village hall after Haiyan was tearing the house apart. (Photo: Lanelyn Carillo/World Vision)

In the devastating wake of Typhoon Haiyan (locally named Yolanda), a small table in a cramped village hall serves as baby Patrick’s new home. Curled in a corner, baby Patrick is in a deep sleep, unaware of what just happened in his hometown.

Recovering childhood in a safe space

Recovering childhood in a safe space | World Vision Blog

Chakkit, 6, came to the Child-Friendly Space dripping wet from swimming in the flood waters. He said, "I want to join and play games." Dry shirts were given to participants as most children came wearing wet clothes. (Photo: ©2013 Jay Mark Mijares/World Vision)

When Teerasak's home in Thailand flooded, his world was turned upside-down. Now, at a World Vision Child-Friendly Space, he and 40 other children have found a place where they can learn, play, talk about their experiences, and simply be kids again.