Disaster Relief

Education or bread

Education or bread | World Vision Blog

14-year-old Ali works at three shops in Lebanon to help his refugee family survive. (Photo: 2014 Patricia Mouamar/World Vision)

The stories of two 14-year-old boys who, living as Syrian refugees in Lebanon, have to be the breadwinners for their families.

See how they balance the choices between bread and education, between pursuing their dreams and survival.

Our mother died because she ran too slow

Our mother died because she ran too slow | World Vision Blog

World Vision Staff member Michael Angkok with 4 orphaned siblings he helped unite with relatives in South Sudan. (Photo: 2015 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Today is World Refugee Day: a day of awareness and renewed committments to help those displaced by conflict and disaster.

Our team recently traveled to South Sudan, where they met a family of four siblings, orphaned and displaced by war.

Read their story.

Syria crisis: Stand up for children living in the margins

Syria crisis: Stand up for children living in the margins | World Vision Blog

World Vision videographer Nathan Shain in Lebanon. (Photo: 2015 Adam Jeske)

Our videographer Nathan Shain traveled to Lebanon this spring to visit Syrian refugee families. He was so moved by his experience, that he set up a personalized fundraising page to support our relief efforts.

See Nathan's Instagram photos and a new video from his trip, and learn how you can set up your own fundraising page!

Where is the Church?

Where is the church? | World Vision Blog

This little girl is a Syrian refugee living in the Shatila Refugee Camp in southern Lebanon. (Photo: 2015 Adam Jeske)

Our Chief Catalyst Steve Haas just returned from visiting Syrian refugees and Christian leaders in Lebanon.

“In light of the greatest migration of refugee people in our lifetime, the Church is standing in a critical gap, showing the love and compassion of Christ to their neighbor.”

But do we care enough? Are we doing enough?

Nepal earthquake: Strangers wanted her little boys

Nepal earthquake: Strangers wanted her little boys | World Vision Blog

7-year-old Aaram and his family are vulnerable to a variety of dangers after losing their house in the Nepal earthquake. (Photo: Theodore Sam/World Vision)

A week after Nepal's deadly earthquake, families are still living out in the open, in tents, in the cold, afraid of aftershocks and returning to unstable, damaged homes.

A few days ago, a stranger approached Kanchi, a mother of three, and asked to adopt her two boys.

See how World Vision works to protect children from a variety of dangers after disaster strikes.

Nepal earthquake: Up close and personal

Nepal earthquake: Up close and personal | World Vision Blog

Matt Stephens in Bhaktapur, Nepal 30 minutes before Saturday's earthquake. (Photo: World Vision)

World Vision U.S. staffer Matt Stephens was in Nepal last week for a conference. On Saturday, he was standing in Durbar Square in Bhaktapur where the photo above was taken.

Half an hour later, a 7.8 earthquake struck, toppling the temple behind him. Experience this disaster and World Vision's response through his eyes.

Living in a conflict zone

Living in a conflict zone | World Vision Blog

Displaced by conflict in Iraq: 27-year old Angham with her 3-year-old Ghazal. “Life is hard living away from our place and knowing our house was destroyed. But I am thankful we are all safe.” (Photo: 2015 World Vision)

As humanitarian development work makes progress against poverty, extreme poverty is receding into the margins: places where disasters, conflict, and other causes push communities from being resilient to vulnerable.

See what it's like to grow up and work in conflict zones first-hand from one of our aid-workers in Iraq.

South Sudan: An invitation to pray

South Sudan: An invitation to pray | World Vision Blog

Dr. Joel Smith spoon feeds a starving baby in a World Vision feeding center. (Photo: 1998 Jon Warren/World Vision)

After a severe famine in 1998 and a 2011 war for independence, the people of the new South Sudan remain in extreme vulnerability through renewed conflict and food insecurity.

On Sunday, our writer/photographer team Kari Costanza and Jon Warren fly to Juba to visit our work among the families displaced by conflict.

See what they're expecting and hoping to find on this visit, and how you can help support them.

Syrian children: “The future depends on us”

Syrian children: “The future depends on us” | World Vision Blog

16-year-old Syrian refugee Ammar has lived in a refugee camp in Jordan for almost 3 years, and hasn't been able to attend school. (Photo: 2013 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Growing up in conflict, displaced, and as refugees, the children of Syria have become a vulnerable generation—at risk of being lost altogether—without access to the things they need to be successful in life.

The future doesn't belong only to the children who grow up in peace.

It belongs to every child.

The faces that stay with you

The faces that stay with you | World Vision Blog

Syrian refugee Ghaziyye with her one of her 4-year-old twin daughters in Lebanon. (Photo: 2013 Lauren Fisher/World Vision)

13-year-old Oujelan. Ghaziyye and her twin girls. 4-year-old Saad, who's forgotten how to play—these are some of the faces that have stayed with today's writer, Lauren Fisher, who visited Lebanon a year ago.

Today, Lauren reflects on the people she met and celebrates the ways that World Vision's work with the Syrian refugees has helped them and many more, and continues.

Syria: Refugees in winter

Syria: Refugees in winter | World Vision Blog

Photo: 2015 Ralph Baydoun/World Vision

World Vision’s Sevil Omer recently traveled to the Middle East, serving with our Syria crisis response, based in Amman, Jordan. She shares insights and the latest from our work providing winter relief to the most vulnerable affected by Syria’s conflict: Children.

Join us as we partner with One Day's Wages to double your ability to help children and families displaced by conflict in Syria and Iraq! For every dollar you give to One Day's Wages' World Vision campaign, they will match, up to $50,000.

Syrian refugees: Four years in crisis

Syrian refugees: Four years in crisis | World Vision Blog

Children displaced from their homes by conflict are living in makeshift, inadequate shelter during this cold winter. (Photo: 2014 Mary Kate MacIsaac/World Vision)

This week, we're partnering with One Day's Wages to double your ability to help children and families displaced by conflict in Syria and Iraq! For every dollar you give to One Day's Wages' World Vision campaign, they will match, up to $50,000.

Today, read where the past four years of crisis have taken the people of Syria and World Vision's journey to assist them, then give and watch it be doubled!

Raising a family after disaster

Raising a family after disaster | World Vision Blog

Bellanda, 10 years old when the 2010 earthquake struck Haiti, attends a World Vision Child-Friendly Space in Port-au-Prince. (Photo: 2010 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Bellanda was 10 years old when the 2010 earthquake struck Haiti. Afterward, she and her family are still able to pursue their big dreams for the future:

“I want to be a children’s doctor one day because I like babies,” Bellanda said.

See how World Vision's programs in the quake's aftermath set this family on the road to recovery.

Day 6: A second typhoon in the midst of healing

Day 6: A second typhoon in the midst of healing | World Vision Blog

Typhoon Hagupit is making landfall in the Philippines right now, in a region that is still recovering from Typhoon Haiyan 13 months ago.

Blogger Matthew Paul Turner was with us in Tacloban just 4 weeks ago and witnessed the devastation of the last storm, the fragility of many people's current living situations, and the rebuilding efforts now threatened by this new storm.

See how World Vision is preparing, and how you can help.

Q&A: Winter in Iraq

Q&A: Winter in Iraq | World Vision Blog

Photo: Iraqi children Oulah, 5, and Zareh, 7, play cat's cradle with a piece of twine. While children often claim that their greatest needs are toys, their parents' priority is preparing for the fast-approaching winter in which temperatures will drop below freezing, and many are protected only by tarpaulins. (©2014 Mark Kate MacIsaac/World Vision)

 

Chris Palusky, a vice president here at World Vision, recently traveled to Iraqi Kurdistan to meet displaced families, aid workers, government officials, and church leaders.

Today, Chris answers a few questions about his visit and provides an update on the needs of families far from home, and World Vision’s response to this crisis in northern Iraq.

New homes recreate shattered lives

New homes recreate shattered lives | World Vision Blog

Photo: Matthew Paul Turner

After Typhoon Haiyan, survivors were living in tents and makeshift shelter; some still do today.

World Vision is building new homes for the most vulnerable families, and providing building supplies and training workshops for thousands more!

Our bloggers are in the Philippines this week, marking the year anniversary of the storm. See the recovery through their eyes ...