Disaster Relief

Pray for the people of Mali

Mali enjoyed two decades of democratic rule until the growing rebel insurgency led to a military coup in March 2012, leaving the former French colony with a weakened government. World Vision began working here in 1975 and is especially concerned for displaced children and families as fighting escalates in the north. Please join World Vision in prayer for the people of Mali.

Aid worker's diary: returning to Goma

During the recent conflict in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, I was evacuated along with other World Vision colleagues to Gisenyi, Rwanda, a town a little more than a mile across the border.

We were later allowed to return to Goma to help civilians who had been displaced. Rebels of the March 23 (M23) movement were in charge of the city, and thousands of people had lost their homes and sense of stability.

A burden that children should never have to bear

An 8-year-old Syrian refugee child named Layla* shares, “I saw my cousin dying in front of me, so I always see this scene in front of my eyes.”

As children all over North America happily rummage through the cheerful remains of Christmas Day’s joys -- festive gift wrap strewn about, the latest version of Halo blaring from 40-inch television screens -- the existence of Syrian children presently seeking refuge in Lebanon is one far less carefree.

In this season of joy, it’s difficult to fathom that at least 66,000 children like Layla are coping with the loss of home and childhood as their families struggle to survive the displacement of war and onset of a cold, snowy winter in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley.

Happy Thanksgiving from Rich Stearns

Dear Friends,

My hope for you this week is that you’ll experience the blessing of sitting at the Thanksgiving table with friends and family. I plan to enjoy Thanksgiving with my wife Reneé, several of my kids, and our grandson. One of my favorite Thanksgiving traditions is to go around the table and each share something that we are thankful for.

Aid worker's diary: A cry for Goma

Congolese walk to a refugee camp in Gisenye, Rwanda. (2012 Reuters/James Akena, courtesy the Thomson Reuters Foundation – AlertNet).

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Rebel forces overtook Goma, the largest city in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), on November 20, forcing tens of thousands of residents to flee for safety.

Much of the country and its borders are now under the control of this rebel group, known as the M23 rebels,  and the situation remains tense.

World Vision evacuated its staff to Gisenyi, Rwanda. Aimee Manimani, a World Vision aid worker in the DRC, shares her thoughts and feelings on leaving the city of Goma.

Superstorm Sandy: A Thanksgiving for gratitude and remembrance

IMAGE: Carmen Rodriguez and her daughter, Zulma Torruella, 17, acquired relief supplies, including a Family Food Kit, at the Hunts Point Alliance for Children, World Vision's local partner. (Photo: Laura Reinhardt/World Vision)

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Last month, World Vision's Laura Reinhardt reported on the devastation of Superstorm Sandy as it made landfall along highly populated areas of the U.S. East Coast, including New York City.

As Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, Laura remembers the families she met during that heartrending time -- and gives thanks for the World Vision supporters whose generosity enabled the assistance we've been able to provide.

Why did I pray?

World Vision's Kari Costanza traveled to Rwanda, where she met Solange, whose life was turned upside-down in a short period of time.

Fighting caused Solange and her family flee their home in the Democratic Republic of Congo. After arriving in Kiegeme refugee camp, Solange lost her 3-year-old daughter, Rebecca.

Kari met Solange in a hospital, where she was staying with her baby, Esther. Kari shares her thoughts on meeting Solange and Esther -- and the tragic news she received after returning to the United States.

PHOTOS: Witness to history

September 22 marks World Vision’s 62nd anniversary of serving children, families, and communities in need.

World Vision photographs document the most tragic crises of the past six decades. Today, many of these places have seen healing and recovery, thanks to the work of nongovernmental organizations.

Mopping up again

Eleven years ago today, in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of 9/11, Americans came together to support and care for those whose lives had been torn apart by the incredible tragedy.

Today, in a similar spirit, Americans are coming together again to care for those left devastated by Hurricane Isaac, which swept across the U.S. Gulf Coast in areas severely damaged by Hurricane Katrina just seven years ago.

Hear how people have reached out to care for their neighbors in the wake of the storm's landfall nearly two weeks ago.

Remembering Hurricane Katrina, responding to Hurricane Isaac

After wreaking havoc across the Dominican Republic and Haiti, killing at least 21 people and forcing thousands to evacuate, Hurricane Isaac pounded the Gulf Coast with heavy rains and high winds on the seventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

Phyllis Freeman, World Vision's domestic disaster response director, remembers that fateful day seven years ago and shares her thoughts on our current response to Isaac.

Smiles, laughter in the midst of crisis

World Vision's Mariana Chokaa reports from Niger, a country left reeling from the drought and hunger crisis that has devastated Africa's Sahel region. At a local clinic, where one might expect to encounter the desperation of malnourished children, she instead observes a downright cheerful atmosphere.

What explains this? World Vision's early interventions amid increasingly dire conditions have helped save lives.