Clean Water

Clean water changes everything

Clean water changes everything | World Vision Blog

Sponsored child Emmanuel celebrates the eruption of water from a newly-drilled water well in Ghana. (Photo: Dr. Greg Allgood/World Vision)

Emmanuel, 20, sponsored through World Vision, says that clean water changes everything.

Read how World Vision's water and sanitation programs in Ghana have transformed Emmanuel's community ... and how they are the cause of new celebrations!

Dirty water: More deadly than war

Dirty water: More deadly than war | World Vision

An Afghan girl collects water. (©2012 Narges Ghafary/World Vision)

More than 16 times as many children die from diarrhea caused by dirty water in Afghanistan as the total number of civilians killed in war.

Today is World Water Day. Read how World Vision is helping to bring clean water to villages in Afghanistan — and what you can do to help bring clean water to the world!

Celebrating 1 billion liters of clean water

Celebrating 1 billion liters of clean water | World Vision Blog

From left: Allison Tummon Kamphuis of P&G; Sakira Ahmed and Failu, the family who received the 1 billionth liter of clean water; and World Vision’s Dr. Greg Allgood. (Photo: World Vision)

Saturday is World Water Day!

Today, Dr. Greg Allgood, vice president for World Vision water, writes about the miracles he's experienced along his journey with World Vision and P&G to provide 1 billion liters of clean drinking water. To mark this milestone, he announces new plans for the future of our work.

Child sponsorship provides lifesaving sanitation and clean water

Child sponsorship provides lifesaving sanitation and clean water | World Vision Blog

“I am happy with my new latrine; I can use it every time that I want and no need to go round the village as before,” says sponsored child Soun, 10, in Laos. (Photo: 2013 World Vision)

Soun's village of 100 in Laos used to lose 3 or 4 people per year due to dirty water, including her infant brother.

See how World Vision's holistic child sponsorship program brought clean water, sanitation, education, and more to her village!

The miracle borehole

The miracle borehole | World Vision Blog

Four-year-old Munsanje pumps water. (Photo: ©2013 Laura Reinhardt/World Vision)

Water is precious in Zambia. In the Twachiyanda region, World Vision drilled for water four times without luck. In 2012, we tried a fifth time.

Read – and watch the video – of how prayer changed the outcome ... and an entire community!

Health and happiness through clean water

Health and happiness through clean water | World Vision Blog

A new World Vision deep well brings health and happiness to the children of this village in Afghanistan. (©2013 Narges Ghafary/World Vision)

Unsafe water is one of the leading causes of child mortality in Afghanistan, with more than 40 percent of child deaths caused by diarrhea and acute respiratory infection. Clean water can prevent these illnesses. See how a World Vision deep well is changing life in young mother Maryam's village.

A flood for clean water

There is no need for people to suffer because of filthy water. That's why World Vision, the Clinton Global Initiative, and Procter & Gamble are calling on friends, supporters, and partners to come together for the Flash Flood for Good.

Rich Stearns, president of World Vision U.S., calls us all to make a difference today.

President Clinton’s toast to clean water

Twelve-year-old Confiance looked up at former President Bill Clinton, who rested his hand on her shoulder. I doubt she really knew who this man was, but she knew that it was a big deal he was visiting this Rwandan school.

And here she was, one of two children chosen to help demonstrate how a life-saving water purification system works.

[Photos] Chelsea Clinton's visit to Myanmar

On Saturday, Chelsea Clinton, board member of the Clinton Foundation, visited a remote village near Pathein, Myanmar, to see the partnership between World Vision and Procter & Gamble (P&G) to provide clean water to children.

P&G’s Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program has provided 6 billion liters of clean drinking water to children and families around the world, a milestone marked on this visit.

WORLD WATER DAY!

Today is World Water Day. Help World Vision and our partners bring sustainable access to clean water -- and the health, economic, and educational benefits it provides -- to the world.

Here's what we're doing:

My walk with World Vision to give water to the thirsty: Part 1

Today's post -- the first of a two-part series -- comes to us from Dr. Greg Allgood, founder and director of the Children’s Safe Drinking Water program at Procter & Gamble.

The global water crisis is a silent killer that takes the lives of more children every year than HIV and malaria combined. More than 2,000 children die every day because of unclean water, poor hygiene, and lack of sanitation. But there is great hope. This is a crisis that we know how to address.

Water program brings a refreshing change for Nalika

A few years ago, water at home was just a dream for the people of the 23rd Colony in Thanamalwila, Sri Lanka. Three tube wells provided drinking water for the entire village. Nalika, 18, and her family had to walk three kilometers to collect water from the lake. Nalika hardly had time to study and was always tired.

How a water well helps open the door to education

We know that access to clean water can help improve the overall health of an entire community.

But how does it help children -- particularly girls -- to stay in school and receive an education? Read what happened in the village of Ganjure Chicho, Ethiopia, to find out.

Why water makes the difference: A tale of two towns

What does clean water mean to you? How often do you think about it? In her fourth blog entry, World Vision's Lauren Fisher compares two communities in Niger -- one that has a safe source of water, and one that does not. Follow Lauren's trip here on our blog or @WorldVisionNews (#wvlauren) for live, on-the-ground reports from the field.

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Lately, you could say water has become a major obsession of mine. In the past, I’ve taken it for granted. It’s the back-up beverage when I can’t find iced tea or soda; it's the bath I can count on at the end of a long day.

But as one colleague told me, in Zinder, water is precious. For me, that means there is no water at all, without warning, at any given time. At any given time, the shower stops working mid-shampoo, along with any other bathroom fixture. It’s made for some comical mornings, as you can well imagine.