Child Protection

Give thanks—part 1: My first Thanksgiving of 2014

Give thanks—part 1: My first Thanksgiving of 2014 | World Vision Blog

Rich and Reneé Stearns with Chitra in Bangladesh. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Happy Thanksgiving! What are you thankful for today? We're thankful for you!

Earlier this month, Rich and Reneé Stearns shared their first Thanksgiving meal of 2014 with Dipshikha, who teaches the children of brothel workers at a World Vision Child Friendly Space in Bangladesh.

Read about their visit.

A women’s cause: Finding hope and courage after Typhoon Haiyan

A women’s cause: Finding hope and courage after Typhoon Haiyan | World Vision Blog

Photo: Jeana Shandraw/SurfandSunshine.com

Extreme poverty and exploitation affect women deeply.

A year after Typhoon Haiyan, a group of women in the Philippines finds solidarity in standing together against human trafficking in their community.

Author Shayne Moore writes from the Philippines.

Living to serve others

Living to serve others | World Vision Blog

Karona Kang in Cambodia has been helping children recover from trafficking and abuse with World Vision since 2009. (Photo: 2014 Vanndeth Um/World Vision)

Karona Kang from Cambodia began working with World Vision as a volunteer. Later, in 2009, she became a housemother at a World Vision Trauma Recovery project for girls who have survived trafficking and abuse.

Today, she tells her story.

Letter: I wouldn’t have today without World Vision

Letter: I wouldn’t have today without World Vision | World Vision Blog

Srey Mom in Cambodia. (Photo: 2005 Jon Warren/World Vision)

Powerful letter to World Vision's American donors today from Srey Mom in Cambodia who, ten years ago, was a victim of trafficking, and thanks to World Vision and to you, was delivered into safety, a bright future, and a life with God.

Getting kids out of the sugarcane fields

Getting kids out of the sugarcane fields | World Vision Blog

Community education team on Negros Island, Philippines. (Photo: 2014 Jesse Eaves/World Vision)

Marking the World Day Against Child Labor today, Jesse Eaves – our policy advisor in D.C. – writes about his recent trip to the Philippines, where World Vision is working with communities to stop hazardous child labor in the sugarcane fields.

Meet 12-year-old Oscar, and read how he's helping to prevent the job that he might have had without this program.

Dreams of soccer and a better life

Dreams of soccer and a better life | World Vision Blog

Márcio lives in Salvador, the most violent city in Brazil. (Photo: 2012 Debora-Oliveira/World Vision)

The World Cup starts this week in Brazil!

In Brazil, World Vision works with many children, like Márcio, who come from a background of violence. By incorporating activities like art, music, and sports – like soccer! – into school curricula, World Vision encourages children to stay in school and off the street.

Read Márcio's story!

Good Friday: Thirsty for justice

Good Friday: Thirsty for justice | World Vision Blog

Juliet holds her son, Junior Kisule, 2, who was saved through an initiative to prevent child sacrifice in Uganda. (©2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

On Good Friday, Jesus' next to last words were: "I am thirsty."

Today, Kari Costanza writes about Obed, a young man in Uganda who is also thirsty — thirsty for justice. “If a life is saved,” he says, “there is no greater good than that.”

Read how this Ugandan superhero's initiative and tireless work within his community are helping to save children from the evil of child sacrifice.

What Disney’s Frozen teaches us about childhood

What Disney’s Frozen teaches us about childhood | World Vision Blog

Children in Romania learn how to build a snowman. (Photo: 1993 Karen Homer/World Vision)

“Do you want to build a snowman?”

What Disney’s Academy Award-winning animated musical Frozen teaches us about childhood, love, and the importance of protecting children.

Salmina escapes from early marriage

Salmina escapes from early marriage | World Vision Blog

Salmina, 16, escaped an arranged, early marriage in Mozambique and is looking forward to returning to school. (Photo: Leovigildo Pedro/World Vision)

16-year-old Salmina lives in Mozambique. Last year, at only 15, she felt that her life was at stake when she was forced to marry a 58-year-old man and leave school.

Thanks to a community member who was trained in child protection issues by World Vision, she escaped from the nightmare. Now she is looking forward to going back to school and pursuing her dream – of teaching mathematics. Read how World Vision is helping to raise awareness around this important issue.

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda

Protection through pierced ears in Uganda | World Vision Blog

3-year-old Sharon in Uganda wears an earring – to protect her from child sacrifice. (Photo: 2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

In certain districts of Uganda, child sacrifice is a real danger. Today, Kari Costanza writes from Uganda about 3-year-old Sharon, whose ear piercing may protect her.

Read how a World Vision-supported amber alert program is helping to recover children that have been taken.

World Poetry Day: “Childhood Lost” by Propaganda

World Poetry Day: “Childhood Lost” by Propaganda | World Vision Blog

Spoken-word artist Propaganda, featured in today's video. (Photo: Scott Erickson)

In honor of World Poetry Day today, we’re featuring our partner, spoken-word poet Propaganda, with a video of his poem “Childhood Lost.”

“Childhood is worth saving, because once it’s gone, it’s gone.”

Watch this powerful video, and learn more about Childhood Lost.

Protecting the poor from the plague of violence

Protecting the Poor from the Plague of Violence | World Vision Blog

"I do not want any one of us to be victims of human trafficking." –Cang, Vietnam. (Photo: 2013 Nguyen Thai Minh Minh/World Vision)

Today, our friends at International Justice Mission write about the everyday violence that is plaguing the developing world … and the new book they're launching today!

Under the big tree

Under the big tree | World Vision Blog

A World Vision savings group meets in Tanzania. (©2014 Jon Warren/World Vision)

This past Friday, our wonderful writer/photographer team (Kari Costanza and Jon Warren) was in Tanzania, where they heard an amazing story of a community standing up to protect a little girl…from a very early marriage. This is what happened!

Su Su is finding her own dream

Su Su is finding her own dream | World Vision Blog

18-year-old Su Su is learning skills as a hairdresser. Now she has hope for her dream of being a hair salon owner.

As a child, Su Su* worked a variety of jobs in Cambodia to help provide for her family, a road that led her into prostitution at the age of 14.

Through a World Vision recovery center, Su Su has learned the skills she needs to follow her dream. Now, she has real plans for her future.

This is her story in her own words.**

Roots and wings

Roots and wings | World Vision Blog

Zebra is a former child soldier who benefited from World Vision’s Rebound project. Today, he has his own carpentry business and is able to lead a normal life. (©2012 Gilbertine Julie Uwimana/World Vision)

A few months ago, World Vision communicator Jeremie Olivier traveled to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and met children benefiting from World Vision’s Rebound project, which helps rehabilitate former child soldiers and prostitutes. Read about his encounter with Zawadi and how this teenager is finding her wings through mechanics.

Betrothed before birth

Today, join us in celebrating the U.N.’s International Day of the Girl Child!

With our partner 10x10 and their documentary, Girl Rising, we're aiming to ignite a movement to educate girls around the world. Millions of girls, like Jenneh in Sierra Leone, face barriers to their education. This is Jenneh's story.

A vision of opportunity for child laborers

Combating forced labor is part of World Vision’s holistic approach to protecting children and ensuring that every child has the opportunity to experience life in all its fullness. World Vision works to address the root causes of child labor and create opportunities for affected children to get an education and leave jobs that are often dangerous, dirty, and degrading.

Today, we present the stories of two boys whose lives as child laborers are turning toward new opportunities through World Vision programs.

A modern-day slave’s second chance

The International Labor Organization estimates that at least 20.9 million men, women, and children around the world suffer in forced labor, though the actual number could be closer to 27 million. Further, 55 percent of victims of forced labor are women, and girls comprise 98 percent of sex trafficking victims.

Chanty* was one of them -- but now she has a second chance.

Why World Vision? Life in all its fullness

Around the world, there are 115 million children trapped in hazardous child labor, and millions more are victims of abuse and other forms of exploitation. Under such conditions, children cannot experience fullness of life. World Vision works to protect children by preventing exploitation and abuse, by restoring children that have been abused, and by speaking out about child protection issues.

Today’s infographic illustrates our work in this sector.