Advocacy

More than social justice

More than social justice | World Vision Blog

Noi (5, left) is learning the Lao alphabet in her Kindergarten classroom. She is sponsored through World Vision’ in Laos. (Photo: ©2014 Mark Nonkes/World Vision)

“There is no tool for development more effective than the education of girls and the empowerment of women.” –Former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

The Millennium Development Goals: 500 days to go

The Millennium Development Goals: 500 days to go | World Vision Blog

The Millennium Development Goals are the most successful global anti-poverty push in history!

With 500 days left to the 15-year target date, learn about the progress that's been made toward these goals so far, what work still needs to be done in the fight against poverty, and where we're headed beyond 2015.

Celebrating fifth birthdays and beyond

Celebrating fifth birthdays and beyond | World Vision Blog

Since 1990, preventable deaths of children under five have dropped from over 12 million to 6.6 million!

Celebrate 5th birthdays with us this week as we renew our commitment to helping children live past the age of 5. Read how you can help!

What a simple piece of paper is worth

What a simple piece of paper is worth | World Vision Blog

Kassahun Kebede with his wife and their little child holding a birth certificate, which is uncommon in Ethiopia. (Photo: 2012 Aklilu Kassaye/World Vision)

Protecting children starts at birth, with a simple piece of paper we all take for granted—a birth certificate. But around the world, as many as 45% of all children under the age of five don't have one.

The Girls Count Act is a new bill in Congress right now that can help address this gap, and help ensure that all children count and are protected.

Mothers and the magic of number 5

Mothers and the magic of number 5 | World Vision Blog

(Photo: Paige Ferrari)

Many children can't survive past the age of 5 without a mother figure. And sadly, every day 18,000 children don't.

But many of these deaths are preventable … so we can do something about it! Stand with us this week and support child and maternal health.

Blogger Paige Ferrari explains how.

Day 3: Share your voice

Day 3: Share your voice | World Vision Blog

Almost a billion people don’t have access to clean water, and more than 4,000 children die every day because of dirty water. Today, let’s do something about it! Join World Vision’s advocacy team in sharing the joy of clean water by asking Congress to pass the Water for the World Act.

[Q&A] Water for the World Act

In today's Q&A, Lisa Bos -- World Vision's policy adviser for health, education, and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) in Washington, D.C. -- describes the Water for the World Act and explains why this new legislation is vital for providing clean water where it's most needed. Lisa is an expert when it comes to this bill -- she helped write it!

Advocacy: Leaving no one behind

Kicking off our "Advocacy 101" series, World Vision's advocacy mobilization specialist, Amanda Morgan, digs into the basics of advocacy -- and the biblical model that forms the foundation of our approach to it.

Shared visions and big returns: The multiplying impact of advocacy

Today, Jesse Eaves, World Vision's senior policy adviser for child protection in Washington, D.C., describes how child sponsorship is an investment in a child's future, and how advocacy -- speaking out on behalf of those affected by poverty and injustice -- increases the return on that investment.

BREAKING: Anti-trafficking bill passes Congress!

Now, on to the president’s desk!

Today, after more than two years of countless phone calls, frustrating roadblocks, and non-stop prayer, your voices rang through the halls of Congress. The Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act passed through the House of Representatives -- only a few weeks after the same provision passed through the Senate!

Now, it goes to President Obama’s desk to be signed into law.

BREAKING: Critical anti-trafficking law passes Senate

The Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) of 2000 is the cornerstone of U.S. policies against modern-day slavery around the world. The TVPA created the first comprehensive federal law to address human trafficking by focusing on both the domestic and international dimensions of this heinous crime. It is what makes the United States the global leader in combating modern-day slavery.

Girl Rising: Writer seeks understanding, shuns condemnation

When Academy-Award nominated director Richard Robbins set out to make “Girl Rising” — a film about girls in the developing world struggling to get an education — he enlisted prominent women writers from each of the countries featured to tell the girls’ stories.

The right to have a name

The national identity card is helping to ensure that children from the Miramar community in Peru have access to their fundamental rights -- like medical care and community programs. Carmen shares how this piece of identification has changed her life -- and the lives of her children.

Film Director Ditches Convention to tell Girls’ Stories

The director of a soon-to-be-released film charting the lives of girls struggling to get an education in some of the world’s toughest places deliberately abandoned the techniques of conventional documentary filmmaking.

The film Girl Rising, whose narrators include Meryl Streep, Kerry Washington, and Selena Gomez, is due for theatrical release in March.

The world through the eyes of a child

Violence. Hunger. Lack of education. Abuse.

Children are the most vulnerable to the consequences of global poverty -- but often, they don't have a platform by which to voice how these issues affect them.

When children do speak out, they often aren't taken seriously. Sometimes, they're dismissed by the adults who are charged with caring for them.

To address this problem, World Vision created a child journalist summit in India to give children the opportunity to have their voices heard.

Educate a girl, change the world

“What we are learning around the world is that if women are healthy and educated, their families will flourish. If women are free from violence, their families will flourish. If women have a chance to work and earn as full and equal partners in society, their families will flourish. And when families flourish, communities and nations do as well.”

—Hillary Rodham Clinton, September 1995, remarks for the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women