Advocacy

Day 3: Share your voice

Day 3: Share your voice | World Vision Blog

Almost a billion people don’t have access to clean water, and more than 4,000 children die every day because of dirty water. Today, let’s do something about it! Join World Vision’s advocacy team in sharing the joy of clean water by asking Congress to pass the Water for the World Act.

[Q&A] Water for the World Act

In today's Q&A, Lisa Bos -- World Vision's policy adviser for health, education, and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) in Washington, D.C. -- describes the Water for the World Act and explains why this new legislation is vital for providing clean water where it's most needed. Lisa is an expert when it comes to this bill -- she helped write it!

Advocacy: Leaving no one behind

Kicking off our "Advocacy 101" series, World Vision's advocacy mobilization specialist, Amanda Morgan, digs into the basics of advocacy -- and the biblical model that forms the foundation of our approach to it.

Shared visions and big returns: The multiplying impact of advocacy

Today, Jesse Eaves, World Vision's senior policy adviser for child protection in Washington, D.C., describes how child sponsorship is an investment in a child's future, and how advocacy -- speaking out on behalf of those affected by poverty and injustice -- increases the return on that investment.

BREAKING: Anti-trafficking bill passes Congress!

Now, on to the president’s desk!

Today, after more than two years of countless phone calls, frustrating roadblocks, and non-stop prayer, your voices rang through the halls of Congress. The Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act passed through the House of Representatives -- only a few weeks after the same provision passed through the Senate!

Now, it goes to President Obama’s desk to be signed into law.

BREAKING: Critical anti-trafficking law passes Senate

The Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) of 2000 is the cornerstone of U.S. policies against modern-day slavery around the world. The TVPA created the first comprehensive federal law to address human trafficking by focusing on both the domestic and international dimensions of this heinous crime. It is what makes the United States the global leader in combating modern-day slavery.

Girl Rising: Writer seeks understanding, shuns condemnation

When Academy-Award nominated director Richard Robbins set out to make “Girl Rising” — a film about girls in the developing world struggling to get an education — he enlisted prominent women writers from each of the countries featured to tell the girls’ stories.

The right to have a name

The national identity card is helping to ensure that children from the Miramar community in Peru have access to their fundamental rights -- like medical care and community programs. Carmen shares how this piece of identification has changed her life -- and the lives of her children.

Film Director Ditches Convention to tell Girls’ Stories

The director of a soon-to-be-released film charting the lives of girls struggling to get an education in some of the world’s toughest places deliberately abandoned the techniques of conventional documentary filmmaking.

The film Girl Rising, whose narrators include Meryl Streep, Kerry Washington, and Selena Gomez, is due for theatrical release in March.

The world through the eyes of a child

Violence. Hunger. Lack of education. Abuse.

Children are the most vulnerable to the consequences of global poverty -- but often, they don't have a platform by which to voice how these issues affect them.

When children do speak out, they often aren't taken seriously. Sometimes, they're dismissed by the adults who are charged with caring for them.

To address this problem, World Vision created a child journalist summit in India to give children the opportunity to have their voices heard.

Educate a girl, change the world

“What we are learning around the world is that if women are healthy and educated, their families will flourish. If women are free from violence, their families will flourish. If women have a chance to work and earn as full and equal partners in society, their families will flourish. And when families flourish, communities and nations do as well.”

—Hillary Rodham Clinton, September 1995, remarks for the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women

The fight to end child trafficking continues

One year ago, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act -- the centerpiece of U.S. policies against modern-day slavery around the world -- expired because Congress failed to reauthorize it in time. Since then, concerned citizens and groups who work to protect children have advocated for the reauthorization bill to be passed.

Below is our latest update from Jesse Eaves, World Vision's child protection policy adviser.

Let’s show the world our compassion and depth

One of my favorite bands is Band of Horses. I love all kinds of music and listen to different types, based on the mood I am in at that moment -- but I can always listen to Band of Horses. It’s all about their lyrics, which I find creative and often very thought-provoking.

Now or never: take a stand on human trafficking legislation

Recently, Jessica Bosquette shared how she saw the Trafficking Victims Protection Act make a difference in the lives of children in the Dominican Republic. She also shared that if Americans failed to tell their senators they want the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act to pass, the positive results it has yielded will be gone. Today, Jesse Eaves, WV Policy Advisor on child protection, provides an update on the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act. He has news that requires a response-- if Americans want to see results, we must act soon.

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There's no doubt about it – it's been a scorcher in Washington, D.C.

Luckily for us, the heat outside is only matched by the heat inside Congress to take action on the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA) S.1301.

But now we can turn up the heat.  We have to make it a political necessity for U.S. senators to vote ‘yes’ for this legislation.  

Human trafficking: Consequences of congressional inaction

Upon arriving at the courthouse in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, we walked up four flights of stairs and into a sparse, yet lively courtroom.

We took our seats on the wooden benches and listened as a pastor from a local church translated the defense attorney’s remarks from Spanish into Creole for three young men.

I was witnessing my first human trafficking trial -- and the Dominican Republic’s first forced child begging case.