A stitch in time empowers

In India, there is a long-standing tradition that women serve men and maintain the home. Many drop out of school; some never venture outside their homes at all.

Through World Vision training programs, women like Jyoti and Khadija receive training in tailoring as well as sewing machines, empowering them to open their own tailor shops and inspire the next generation.

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    Learning harmony through musical education

    In a classroom, when a teacher combines musical knowledge, passion, and patience with a group of children thrilled by music, the results are extraordinary.

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      Why World Vision? Educating children for life

      Worldwide, 67 million elementary-aged children are not enrolled in school. Every one of them is at greater risk of exploitation, early marriage, and lower income over the course of their life. World Vision works to break down the barriers that keep kids out of school and to ensure that students receive a quality education. Today’s infographic shows how.

       

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        [Video] Jason thanks his mother for his education

        Jason was a sponsored child from Vida Nueva, a World Vision program in Costa Rica. The community completed its 15-year process in 2012. Challenged to make a video about education, Jason decided to interview his mother, thanking her for the opportunities she has worked to give him.

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          World Vision promotes literacy through donated books

          Did you know that today is World Book and Copyright Day? Probably not -- but it's a great opportunity for us to highlight World Vision's commitment to education and literacy across the globe.

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            A young girl’s journey toward education in Nepal

            When Laxmi was 8 years old, she decided to quit school, as all her older sisters had done after they finished fifth grade. But in 2001, World Vision enrolled Laxmi as a sponsored child. Now, she is completing twelfth grade and hoping to become a teacher.

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              Learning to count at age 15

              Today's story comes from the slums of New Delhi, India. Sonam's family struggled to make a living, so education wasn't a priority for her life. In many developing countries, this is a reality faced by young girls, as depicted in the film Girl Rising.

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              Eka…do…tina. The first three numbers in the Hindi language now come naturally to Sonam. Her dimpled cheeks and childlike smile reveal her pride.

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                [Video] Now I know my ABC's

                For may students in the United States, singing the ABCs is one of the first lessons in the classroom. You might be surprised to learn that children in Bartabwa, Kenya, know a very similar version. See for yourself as Kris Allen sings with elementary school students.

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                  A bicycle, and the change it brought

                  Pushpa is a shy 15-year-old sponsored girl in the tenth grade. In her small village in India, she's known for great achievements.

                  Looking back on the uncertainty she's experienced recently, Pushpa is glad to be back in school -- with a bicycle to take her there.

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                    A place to learn and call home

                    It’s been nearly three years since the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and many people there are still living in squalid conditions in camps. Families who had the means to leave the camps have now gone, and those remaining are among Port-au-Prince’s most vulnerable.

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