When life hands you lemons

Post Summary: 

The heat of summer is the perfect time for lemonade stands!

Blogger Matthew Paul Turner describes what lemonade stands meant for him as a kid, mean to him now as a father, and how they can be a great way to get kids involved with helping others around the world.

***

On a hot summer day when I was 9 years old, my younger sister and I decided that we were going to set up a lemonade stand at the end of our driveway. Upon telling our father about our plan, he grimaced slightly. Now, Dad wasn’t exactly against the idea of Elisabeth and me selling mediocre lemonade to the people who drove by our house, he just worried that our backroad wasn’t an ideal location for that to happen.

Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

    The support of a mother

    Post Summary: 

    A Mother's Day message for mothers from bestselling author Debbie Macomber!

    ***

    There's a picture in my baby book of my mother giving me a bath in our kitchen sink. I must have been about nine months old and my face is full of delight as I splash in the water. Although my mother isn't in the photograph, her arm is there supporting my back.

    Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

      Moriah’s child

      Post Summary: 

      “The Easter story is a story of justice and the length that someone would go to bring justice to the world.”

      See how a brand-new child sponsorship is helping to bring justice, happiness, and joy to a little girl in Zambia this Lenten season.

      ***

      For Moriah Rees, it had been an awkward conversation—one that left her uncertain.

      “Ever since I started working at World Vision, people would ask me, ‘Do you have a sponsored child?’ I tried. I looked on the web and didn’t connect with any of the children. I asked myself, ‘What’s wrong with me?’”

      Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

        Forever changed by clean water

        Post Summary: 

        This summer, blogger Rachel Teodoro traveled with us to Uganda to dedicate a new clean water borehole for one of our communities.

        Through her eyes, witness the energy and pure joy that the people of this community felt at having clean water, and see how they will be forever changed by it.

        ***

        I was crying before we even got out of the van. The crowd was at least 200 strong. We could hear the singing. We could feel the joy from the songs being sung. Words we didn't know, sounds we weren't familiar with, but smiles and expressions that didn't require the same language to understand that they radiated a thankfulness and joy unlike any I had heard. There were mothers with babies on their hips and children of all ages. Even men stopped their afternoon work and came out to this celebration. They were gathered to dedicate a borehole.

        Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

          Quenching more than thirst

          Post Summary: 

          While traveling in India, blogger Amy Bellgardt visited a World Vision water program and was so inspired that she became one of our World Vision Bloggers!

          See how clean water is helping to empower women in India … and how these programs inspired Amy.

          ***

          How many times do you turn on a water faucet each day?

          Have you ever thought about it?

          Think about each time you visit the restroom, wash your hands, take a bath or shower, wash food, laundry … the number will likely be quite high. That is just you, too. Factor in your family members and you’ve easily used  gallons and gallons used every single day.

          The ease and convenience of clean water is literally right at our fingertips.

          Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

            Benny’s smile

            Post Summary: 

            Meet Benny in Zambia … a father who smiles because his family no longer has to worry about dirty water!

            Read his story and see how clean water is helping this community expand their church.

            ***

            Today I hold a brick in my hands and a smile in my heart. They both come from the same person: Benny Hampande.

            Benny’s smile is not the kind of smile you often see coming from a man who lives in rural Africa. I’ve met fathers all across Africa and around the world for whom the burden of parenthood is draining. Worrying and working to help a family survive every day can sap a man’s energy and enthusiasm. So can having children who are constantly sick and a wife who is always bone tired.

            Benny’s life is different.

            Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

              Now, they can drink

              Post Summary: 

              Pastor and author Max Lucado has spent his career bringing the living water of the Gospel to the world.

              Max is also a long-time partner of World Vision, and this winter hosted a social fundraiser hoping to bring clean water to 20,000 people in Ethiopia.

              See how many people will receive clean water through Max and his readers …

              ***

              Now, they can drink | World Vision Blog
              Photo: 2009 Jon Warren/World Vision

              It was hard to forget the muddy water.

              Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

                Defying the norm

                Post Summary: 

                In Africa, drilling for water is typically a man's job.

                But Lucie Bibata Dembele is defying this norm, managing two of World Vision's drilling rigs and the 6-men teams that operate them!

                See what it's like to be a woman in this role.

                ***

                When a village in Africa receives a well that brings clean water, it’s women and children who often spend hours every day carrying water who benefit the most. But it is usually men who design and build the water systems.

                Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

                  PHOTOBLOG: A sick girl gets clean water

                  Post Summary: 

                  Dorcas is 9 and lives in the Bulanda community in Zambia.

                  When World Vision first met her, she was gathering water four times each day from a disgusting water hole, in which animals sometimes died. Dorcas was often sick with diarrhea.

                  But life is turning around for Dorcas! See the change in her life through photos.

                  ***

                  This water hole in Zambia was the only source of drinking water for the people of Bulanda. When this photo was taken last summer, two cows had recently fallen in, and the people had discovered dog fur floating in it—when they dug around the bottom with a stick, a dead, decaying dog had risen to the surface.

                  Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

                    A not-so-simple cup of tea

                    Post Summary: 

                    While traveling with World Vision in Kenya last summer, bestselling author Debbie Macomber met Veronica, a mother of 7, who served her a simple cup of tea.

                    Behind that cup of tea was a long and difficult journey because getting something as simple as the water for the tea was challenging.

                    See the difference that clean water makes through Debbie's eyes.

                    ***

                    I had a delicious cup of tea last summer, the memory of which I will hold for the remainder of my days. It wasn't an ordinary tea bought in a store. This was a special tea called Kenya Tea. I went to great lengths for that simple cup of tea, lengths that included a trip halfway around the world.

                    Read more on the World Vision Blog about: