The power of a grandmother’s love

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Elizabeth in Zambia is the matriarch of her family. But this grandmother's primary role isn't only to love and dote on them … she's their provider. And for the past few years, she has struggled.

Through her church and a variety of World Vision programs, Elizabeth can now show her love to her family through food, education, health, and a life transformed out of poverty!

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At 65, Elizabeth Petulu is a widow, mother to seven children, and grandmother to 24. None of her children have completed their education and, worse still, none of them have entered formal employment.

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    When Moses got milk

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    Our writer/photographer team Kari and Jon are in Rwanda this week! On Tuesday, they met 11-year-old Moses, an orphan who was brought back from the brink of death by milk.

    See how cows and a pay-it-forward spirit are helping to transform Rwandan communities and young lives.

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    On Tuesday, I met the most incredible boy, a boy who shouldn’t be alive to tell his story. His name is Moses.

    Moses lives in southern Rwanda, in a place with the highest level of malnutrition in the entire country. 

    Nearly half—45 percent of all children who live here—are stunted.

    Moses was hungry—so hungry that he did the unthinkable: He tried to suckle the milk from goats.

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      A second chance at Christmas

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      Today is Christmas in Armenia!

      The land where Noah's Ark came to rest after the flood in Genesis, Armenia has long been a land of second chances. See how today, Armenia is getting a second chance after the fall of communism, and how World Vision is helping through child sponsorship and more.

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      Merry Christmas!

      It’s Christmas Day in Armenia today. In the fourth century, the Catholic Church established December 25 as Christmas, but the Armenian Apostolic and Evangelical Churches adhere to an older Christmas Day.

      I will be joining my Armenian friends by celebrating Christmas in my heart today along with them. Why not celebrate a second time? Especially as Armenia is truly a land of second chances.

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        Day 20: The twelve smiles of Christmas

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        Twelve of our favorite smiles from children around the world for the twelve days of Christmas!

        Which one is your favorite?

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        "Every time you smile at someone, it is an action of love, a gift to that person, a beautiful thing." –Mother Teresa

         

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          Day 18: A child worker becomes an artist

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          "When I see a child crying, that affects me.” Joel, 22, is pursuing his big dream of being a painter in Peru.

          Having been a child worker, Joel understands that life better than most. That's why his college thesis is a series of paintings depicting child workers.

          See how his life transformed from a laborer to an artist!

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          The first of Joel's drawings I saw was a tree. He'd sketched it in pencil on the back of his notebook, the roots almost as big as the trunk and branches. Even under the harsh glare of fluorescent light, I knew it was special. Over the next few days as I spent more time with him, I realized Joel was a lot like that tree—flourishing vibrantly thanks to deep roots.

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            Day 17: What I didn’t wish for

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            Jane Sutton-Redner, the editorial director of our World Vision Magazine, first met Jhon in Peru – the "singer of his neighborhood" – when he was 6, back in 1997. She quickly arranged to sponsor him.

            Jhon is 24 now, and Jane had the opportunity to visit him again last month! See the difference her relationship has made in his life, and the dream that came true for him that she hadn't even wished for.

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            Adults tend to graft their own dreams onto their children. For example, I hope that my 8-year-old son will be a famous writer someday. 

            Day 18: What I didn’t wish for | World Vision Blog
            Jhon at the age of 8.
            (Photo: 1999 Jane Sutton-Redner)
             

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              Day 16: Aurora Popp's big dream

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              Love, loss, and healing in Romania: how 20 years of friendship, 25 years of recovery after communism, and healing after loss are leading these two friends – Aurora and Kari – to find loving sponsors for 500 Romanian children.

              Join them today!

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              I met Aurora Popp in 1997 in Bucharest, Romania. It was my second overseas trip for World Vision and I was traveling to cover stories about World Vision’s incredible work in the orphanages and with young, unmarried mothers who had decided to keep their babies.

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                Day 4: The blessings of special gifts

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                Special Gifts are extra donations that you can send to your sponsored child: our staff in the field will meet with the family and use that gift to purchase whatever they need most!

                See how Tony in Kenya and his family have been blessed through gifts from his sponsor.

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                Seven-year-old Tony, a grade-two student, is a World Vision sponsored child in Kenya. Through special gifts from his sponsor, Tony and his family received goats that provide the family with milk and a source of income.

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                  Day 3: No more lost dreams

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                  Antonio in Mozambique had to give up his dream job because he didn't have a birth certificate. But now his children won't have to face that challenge because through World Vision sponsorship, the whole family now has birth certificates.

                  World Vision’s child sponsorship program approaches community development holistically: providing clean water, healthcare, access to education, nutritious food, economic development, and more!

                  Through your support, communities supported by World Vision are equipped to fulfill the dream and vision that God has for all of His people. See it at work in Mozambique!

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                  Antonio Namatbia had his dream job – teaching school – for seven years. Then in 2002, the government of Mozambique began to require that all citizens needed to have a birth certificate in order to receive their salary.

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                    How sponsoring a child changes the trajectory of young lives

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                    The World Vision Bloggers are in the Philippines! Follow their trip here.

                    Yesterday, they visited a World Vision sponsorship community in Dulag, where the children were excited and anxious to write Christmas cards to their American sponsors. Jennifer James describes why …

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                    Most do not fully understand how little material possessions people have that live in low- and middle-income countries around the world. When a letter comes in the mail from a child’s sponsor, she cherishes that letter greatly. It becomes a part of her. Eventually she knows it by heart. This may sound a bit exaggerated, but it’s true. I heard it for myself today.

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