Su Su is finding her own dream

Post Summary: 

As a child, Su Su* worked a variety of jobs in Cambodia to help provide for her family, a road that led her into prostitution at the age of 14.

Through a World Vision recovery center, Su Su has learned the skills she needs to follow her dream. Now, she has real plans for her future.

This is her story in her own words.**

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When I was 10 and a scavenger on the street and in the markets, there were many beauty salons. I remember looking at the people getting their hair done, and wished I could become beautiful like them.

I am the fourth child of seven. I am 18 years old. My goal is to earn money for my family. Since I was 12, I transplanted rice, climbed coconut trees and sold coconuts, and washed dishes at a street restaurant.

You might wonder why I did these jobs. I come from a poor family and my parents used violence. Before I was 12, I was living with my grandmother.

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    Roots and wings

    Post Summary: 

    A few months ago, World Vision communicator Jeremie Olivier traveled to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and met children benefiting from World Vision’s Rebound project, which helps rehabilitate former child soldiers and prostitutes. Read about his encounter with Zawadi and how this teenager is finding her wings through mechanics.

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    As I met with children in the northeast Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) last fall while on a short-term assignment, a quote kept coming to mind: “There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give to our children. One of these is roots, the other wings.” This quote from Henry Ward Beecher, a clergyman known for supporting the abolition of slavery, is particularly meaningful to me as a parent.

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        A poem to an unknown mother

        World Vision's Elda Spaho writes about child protection and the programs World Vision supports in Albania that help abused and abandoned children. Read Catherine's story and the poem she wrote to her absent mother.

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          A vision of opportunity for child laborers

          Combating forced labor is part of World Vision’s holistic approach to protecting children and ensuring that every child has the opportunity to experience life in all its fullness.

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            A modern-day slave’s second chance

            The International Labor Organization estimates that at least 20.9 million men, women, and children around the world suffer in forced labor, though the actual number could be closer to 27 million. Further, 55 percent of victims of forced labor are women, and girls comprise 98 percent of sex trafficking victims.

            Chanty* was one of them -- but now she has a second chance.

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              Why World Vision? Life in all its fullness

              Around the world, there are 115 million children trapped in hazardous child labor, and millions more are victims of abuse and other forms of exploitation. Under such conditions, children cannot experience fullness of life. World Vision works to protect children by preventing exploitation and abuse, by restoring children that have been abused, and by speaking out about child protection issues.

              Today’s infographic illustrates our work in this sector.

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                Sumi's journey from horror to new hope

                In February, advocates won a huge victory when the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA) passed Congress with broad bipartisan support. The TVPRA allowed the U.S. government to partner with the government of Bangladesh to pass its own anti-trafficking law in 2012.

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                  [Video] Melka's story: Child bride to advocate for girls

                  We first brought you the story of Melka in Ethiopia last year. Today, we're excited to present this video depiction of the remarkable young woman's journey.

                  Melka was 14 years old when, to her surprise, her parents married her off to an older man from another village whom she didn't even know. When Melka resisted him later that evening, he and his friends beat her severely. She woke up in the hospital.

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                    Only a child, but already a man

                    More than 10,000 Cambodians cross the border into Thailand every day to earn a living. Among the throng of workers and peddlers are children like Horm, who gathers recyclable trash and sells his gleanings at Rong Kluea market.

                    He is only 10, but he already works like a man. Between his rounds, he drops by a World Vision learning center to play. It is at this center where he experiences just a few moments of being a child.

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