Protecting the poor from the plague of violence

Post Summary: 

Today, our friends at International Justice Mission write about the everyday violence that is plaguing the developing world … and the new book they're launching today!

***

Between the Super Bowl yesterday and the Winter Olympics opening ceremony this Friday, human trafficking has been in the spotlight recently. And it should be. There’s a common belief that major sports events exacerbate trafficking, and while that may not be true, it also doesn’t mean that trafficking isn’t a problem at those events.

Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

    Under the big tree

    Post Summary: 

    This past Friday, our wonderful writer/photographer team (Kari Costanza and Jon Warren) was in Tanzania, where they heard an amazing story of a community standing up to protect a little girl…from a very early marriage. This is what happened!

    ***

    It was a bigger meeting than usual under the big tree in Mbuyuni village, Tanzania.

    Mbuyuni is named for the incredible baobab — a spectacular tree that looks as if it was plucked from the earth and turned upside down, its roots reaching skyward. But strangely, there are no baobabs in Mbuyuni anymore. Other great big trees stand in for meetings.

    Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

      Su Su is finding her own dream

      Post Summary: 

      As a child, Su Su* worked a variety of jobs in Cambodia to help provide for her family, a road that led her into prostitution at the age of 14.

      Through a World Vision recovery center, Su Su has learned the skills she needs to follow her dream. Now, she has real plans for her future.

      This is her story in her own words.**

      ***

      When I was 10 and a scavenger on the street and in the markets, there were many beauty salons. I remember looking at the people getting their hair done, and wished I could become beautiful like them.

      I am the fourth child of seven. I am 18 years old. My goal is to earn money for my family. Since I was 12, I transplanted rice, climbed coconut trees and sold coconuts, and washed dishes at a street restaurant.

      You might wonder why I did these jobs. I come from a poor family and my parents used violence. Before I was 12, I was living with my grandmother.

      Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

        Roots and wings

        Post Summary: 

        A few months ago, World Vision communicator Jeremie Olivier traveled to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and met children benefiting from World Vision’s Rebound project, which helps rehabilitate former child soldiers and prostitutes. Read about his encounter with Zawadi and how this teenager is finding her wings through mechanics.

        ***

        As I met with children in the northeast Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) last fall while on a short-term assignment, a quote kept coming to mind: “There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give to our children. One of these is roots, the other wings.” This quote from Henry Ward Beecher, a clergyman known for supporting the abolition of slavery, is particularly meaningful to me as a parent.

        Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

          Betrothed before birth

          Today, join us in celebrating the U.N.’s International Day of the Girl Child!

          Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

            A poem to an unknown mother

            World Vision's Elda Spaho writes about child protection and the programs World Vision supports in Albania that help abused and abandoned children. Read Catherine's story and the poem she wrote to her absent mother.

            *     *     *

            Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

              A vision of opportunity for child laborers

              Combating forced labor is part of World Vision’s holistic approach to protecting children and ensuring that every child has the opportunity to experience life in all its fullness.

              Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

                A modern-day slave’s second chance

                The International Labor Organization estimates that at least 20.9 million men, women, and children around the world suffer in forced labor, though the actual number could be closer to 27 million. Further, 55 percent of victims of forced labor are women, and girls comprise 98 percent of sex trafficking victims.

                Chanty* was one of them -- but now she has a second chance.

                Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

                  Why World Vision? Life in all its fullness

                  Around the world, there are 115 million children trapped in hazardous child labor, and millions more are victims of abuse and other forms of exploitation. Under such conditions, children cannot experience fullness of life. World Vision works to protect children by preventing exploitation and abuse, by restoring children that have been abused, and by speaking out about child protection issues.

                  Today’s infographic illustrates our work in this sector.

                  Read more on the World Vision Blog about:

                    Sumi's journey from horror to new hope

                    In February, advocates won a huge victory when the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA) passed Congress with broad bipartisan support. The TVPRA allowed the U.S. government to partner with the government of Bangladesh to pass its own anti-trafficking law in 2012.

                    Read more on the World Vision Blog about: