Recent Posts By Annila Harris

Labor of love

Labor of love | World Vision Blog

3-year-old Omega enjoys the benefits of a healthy and improved life style provided by a sustainable source of income. (Photo: ©2014 Annila Harris/World Vision)

Tlangnunthang was once a poor casual laborer in India with no steady income and a grim future, but now he has become a successful rubber entrepreneur, earning a sustainable income and dreaming big.

Aim to help him generate a sustainable income, World Vision gave him 200 rubber tree saplings, which have enabled his family to have access to good food, health, and education. And two of his children are sponsored through World Vision!

Protection through education

Protection through education | World Vision Blog

Before Ankit, 6, started attending World Vision's drop-in center last year, he used to roam the streets. (Photo: 2013 Annila Harris/World Vision)

One of the best ways to protect children from dangers like trafficking, child labor, and early marriage is to educate them, keeping them in school rather than on the streets. In India, World Vision's drop-in centers are designed to do just that: opening the door to mainstream schools.

Here are the stories of two children – Naina, 7, and Ankit, 6 – who found their way into formal education through these drop-in centers.

The Apple of my eye

The apple of my eye | World Vision Blog

Sponsored child Apple takes care of her baby sister, Roalyn. Apple's family is one of many affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Their home was damaged by the typhoon. (©2013 Annila Harris/World Vision)

Today marks two months since Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the Philippines. After the storm, World Vision communicator Annila Harris visited survivors and met sponsored child Apple, whose family is benefiting from World Vision relief supplies. The way this little girl cared for her baby sister, Roalyn, taught Annila that even when a disaster takes away almost everything, the most important thing in life is still family.

A contest to end malnutrition

A contest to end malnutrition | World Vision Blog

Women and children of Badnapur and Solamoh villages, who participated in the Nutrition Exhibition 2012, aiming to combat malnutrition with creative recipes and education. (Photo: 2012 Annila Harris/World Vision)

The Melghat region of India is known for its high rates of child malnutrition. In response to this challenge, World Vision India devised an innovative technique for change, not only targeting attitude and behavior, but also aiming to address the source of the problem, with … a cooking contest!

A stitch in time empowers

In India, there is a long-standing tradition that women serve men and maintain the home. Many drop out of school; some never venture outside their homes at all.

Through World Vision training programs, women like Jyoti and Khadija receive training in tailoring as well as sewing machines, empowering them to open their own tailor shops and inspire the next generation.

The therapeutic power of tea

Life in the Indian village of Mawlyngot used to revolve around the brewery, which led many toward alcoholism. Now, through a World Vision initiative, the villagers plant and harvest tea instead -- bringing about a therapeutic transformation for everyone.

Sponsorship Q&A with a Program Manager in India

World Vision works with each community and its families to determine what is needed most to improve the lives of their children and fight poverty.

Recently, our Facebook fans submitted questions about how this happens. With those questions in hand, World Vision's Annila Harris interviewed Pratyush Das, our program manager in India.

Pratyush’s background is originally in finance, and he has worked with World Vision for 13 years in a variety of different areas. His responses reflect his expertise in the South Delhi area development program.

Redeeming what was once lost

Today's story comes from India, where Amit and his family have undergone a remarkable journey from the darkest depths of poverty to a sense of renewed hope and freedom from potentially tragic outcomes -- like street begging and dangerous labor.